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Novel uses of GPS?


DadX4
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Anybody have any interesting stories of novel uses of GPS's?

 

For example, I recently heard of a woman that suspected her husband of seeing someone else, so she put a GPS in his car, then later retrieved it and followed the breadcrumbs to a motel.

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quote:
Originally posted by RuffRidr:

You can use a GPS to mark the greens on a golf course. Then on subsequent visits you know how close to the green you are +/- 15 ft.

 

--RuffRidr


 

But isn't it hard on the GPS to whack it with a Five Iron? icon_biggrin.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by RuffRidr:

You can use a GPS to mark the greens on a golf course. Then on subsequent visits you know how close to the green you are +/- 15 ft.


 

That's all well and good... but does anyone make golf balls that will follow a gps waypoint rather than my pathetic swing? Maybe then I would't lose so many.

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well, i have heard of people using them to clock the speed of their lawnmowers

 

the military uses gps in artillery rounds to monitor the trajectory and lots of data about the flight of the rounds as they head for the target, maybe you could find a way to make a golf ball land on target?

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quote:
Originally posted by kevin917z:

well, i have heard of people using them to clock the speed of their lawnmowers

 

the military uses gps in artillery rounds to monitor the trajectory and lots of data about the flight of the rounds as they head for the target, maybe you could find a way to make a golf ball land on target?


 

Now that could just work... need somebody who can aim properly though... really, you'd have to see me play. Looking on the brightside, I get much more excercise than the average golfer when playing!

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quote:
Originally posted by kevin917z:

well, i have heard of people using them to clock the speed of their lawnmowers

 

the military uses gps in artillery rounds to monitor the trajectory and lots of data about the flight of the rounds as they head for the target, maybe you could find a way to make a golf ball land on target?


 

I feel sorry for the poor sap who had to ride those artillery rounds AND try to read the GPS at the same time.....

 

--------------------------------------------------

"If you ever go temporarily insane, don't shoot somebody, like a lot of people do. Instead, try to get some weeding done, because you'd really be surprised." - Jack Handy

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Well, the golf cart can go 24.3 MPH, cutting the grass took me 2.3 miles at an avg speed of 10.4 MPH. I used it to measure the driveway to end a dispute. .23 miles. I used it to calculate the size of the pastures, 2.

5 acres. Marked out "roughly" where the new fence will go. and when horseback riding I duct-taped my legend (in a ziplock) to my helmet. top speed 12.8 MPH, went 6.76 miles. One trip around the ring is .21 miles. The trail we made is 1.32 miles. and once I strapped it on my dog to find out where she was going on her frequent wanderings. (we had to put a fence up when we found just how far she goes) And that is just the start. You can do come cool things if you put your mind to it.

 

Joe Smith

 

I seek the Holy Grail!

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BC Ferries Queen of Vancouver we hit about 36 km/hour running with the tide I suspect, leaving Active pass on the Vancouver side. It was also neat to see the track we layed down as we had to swing hard to miss a couple of really STUPID sailboat operators...Right turn Cylde....

 

Without your brain, a map is a piece of coloured paper, a compass is a glorified magnet, and a GPS is a waterproof battery case." " Foothills SAR "

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I've just taken up cycling for the exercise (as opposed to taking it up for fun!). I use the GPS to track how far I've ridden, and average speed (I try to keep it at about 10mph.) Yes, I can get a speedometer for the bike to do all this as well, but the GPSr is already paid for...

 

-- RK

 

"I drank WHAT?!?" -- Socrates

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My speedometer and odometer do not work on my Bronco, and I used it to make the truck eligible for my daughter to use it to pass her driving test for the DMV. On the highway I will occasionally turn it on to find out how badly I am breaking the speed limit.

 

I also use it to measure distance to targets out in the woods for practice shooting my rifle. 300 feet is a 100 yard target, and a whole lot more accurate than pacing it off.

26 days until California's Coastal Rifle Deer Season Opens!!!!!!!!!

 

______________________________

How do they get a deer to cross at that yellow road sign?

http://www.geocities.com/cacheinon

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Well, how about this?

 

I had the pleasure of meeting Olivier Humez when I attended (and proudly wore my Geocaching shirt) KAPiCA/02 in November of last year. It was an international gathering of folks who do low level aerial photography using a kite to lift the camera.

 

Olivier won the technical award for his rig that not only had a video feed for aiming the rig but he also transmitted data about his digital camera and from his GPSr that was attached to his rig. It was amazing. Put my rigs to shame!

 

George

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quote:
Originally posted by kevin917z:

well, i have heard of people using them to clock the speed of their lawnmowers


 

4 MPH. I didn't check the mileage as I lose sats under the dense maple trees. It only takes about 10 minutes though...which would be 2/3rd's of a mile.

 

(Hey, the lawn tractor was cheaper than a used mower: $50!)

 

Grin,

 

Randy

 

PS: Used it to mark likely put-ins/take-outs white-water canoe/kayaking seen from the river. Used it as a speedometer for everything from kayak to bike to mower to plane. Used it as an odometer w/a hiking group. Trying to break 50 MPH downhill skiing (got up to 47 at Vail, CO).

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quote:
Originally posted by kevin917z:

well, i have heard of people using them to clock the speed of their lawnmowers


 

4 MPH. I didn't check the mileage as I lose sats under the dense maple trees. It only takes about 10 minutes though...which would be 2/3rd's of a mile.

 

(Hey, the lawn tractor was cheaper than a used mower: $50 delivered!)

 

Grin,

 

Randy

 

PS: Used it to mark likely put-ins/take-outs white-water canoe/kayaking seen from the river. Used it as a speedometer for everything from kayak to bike to mower to plane. Used it as an odometer w/a hiking group. Trying to break 50 MPH downhill skiing (got up to 47 at Vail, CO).

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quote:
Originally posted by Brant:

One thing I like to do is take my GPS when I am traveling on commerical jets. If I get a seat by the window, it sits nicely on my armrest. It is interesting to watch the speed, altitude and know what you are flying over.


 

I'm flying from Chi-town to Denver soon. I'm gonna have to try it.

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quote:
Originally posted by Brant:

One thing I like to do is take my GPS when I am traveling on commerical jets. If I get a seat by the window, it sits nicely on my armrest. It is interesting to watch the speed, altitude and know what you are flying over.


 

If you listen to the flight attendant instructions at the beginning of the flight, they will tell you that you are forbidden from turning on any GPS devices in flight.

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Actually it's not illegal, or damaging to any flight control or nav receivers. It's generally just a policy of each particular airline. I'll look up a reference for that and post as soon as I find it, or I KNOW I'll get flamed!! icon_biggrin.gif

 

"There's no need to be afraid of strange noises in the night. Anything that intends you harm will stalk you silently."

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I've used mine for calculating my speed while skiing (43 mph) and total vertical feet for the day (forget the exact number but it was in the mid 30 thousands).

 

I also used it during trail work to re-route a hiking trail around private property. I found the property line stake then walked about 100 yards from it (onto state land)and marked a waypoint. Then I drove to the other end of the trail and walked to where the trail was about to enter private property.

 

Hit go to and using the directional arrow and topo display to choose the route, I started flagging it. A crew followed me with weed whackers, loppers and a chainsaw. It made what is usually a pain in the neck procedure, very easy.

 

"Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, he'll sit in a boat and drink beer all day" - Dave Barry

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quote:
Originally posted by Dad and the Dynamic Duo:

Well, how about http://perso.wanadoo.fr/ohumez/kapelectronics/susvide1.htm#gps?

 

I had the pleasure of meeting Olivier Humez when I attended (and proudly http://www.dolphinazur.nl/kapnet/KAPiCA02/d.jpg my Geocaching shirt) KAPiCA/02 in November of last year. It was an international gathering of folks who do low level aerial photography using a kite to lift the camera.

 

Olivier won the technical award for his rig that not only had a video feed for aiming the rig but he also transmitted data about his digital camera and from his GPSr that was attached to his rig. It was amazing. Put my http://www.kitekam.com/rigs.htm to shame!

 

George


 

Wow that's pretty high tech. I've been looking at Kite Aerial Photography for a while now (I think I first saw a link to it somewhere on this board about a year ago), and it's amazing how involved some people get with it. It's kinda like Geocaching like that. I've been meaning to build a rig and give it a try, but I've just never gotten around to it. I really liked your house/barn pics on your page by the way.

 

Mr. 0

 

"Remember that nature and the elements are neither your friend or your enemy - they are actually disinterested."

 

Department of the Army Field Manual FM 21-76 "Survival" Oct. 1970

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Mr. O wrote:

 

quote:
Wow that's pretty high tech. I've been looking at Kite Aerial Photography for a while now (I think I first saw a link to it somewhere on this board about a year ago), and it's amazing how involved some people get with it. It's kinda like Geocaching like that. I've been meaning to build a rig and give it a try, but I've just never gotten around to it. I really liked your house/barn pics on your page by the way.

 

Thanks! KAP has taken a back seat to caching - primarily because my family can enjoy it with me too where KAP is harder to do as a family event and have all enjoy the experience. They're both kinda geeky cool. The big difference is that with caching we try to keep a low profile to avoid geomuggles. With kite flying, it is not unusual for me to draw a crowd. Though I do hang some unusual stuff from kites. Two weeks ago, we were with friends at the beach and I had only brought a mid-sized delta and no KAP gear. On of my friends broke his lawn chair so I put it on the line and sent it up. A chair 200 feet in the air tends to draw attention! icon_cool.gif

 

Shoot me an e-mail if I can help in any way. I know of some great resources that could help you get a rig in the air. For example, here is a simple kit including the camera for $25USD.

 

George

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quote:
Originally posted by HitsMan and Chris:

quote:
Originally posted by Brant:

One thing I like to do is take my GPS when I am traveling on commerical jets. If I get a seat by the window, it sits nicely on my armrest. It is interesting to watch the speed, altitude and know what you are flying over.


 

If you listen to the flight attendant instructions at the beginning of the flight, they will tell you that you are forbidden from turning on any GPS devices in flight.


 

If you fly SouthWest and read their list of what you can and cannot have on, that will tell you that GRPRs can be on in-flight (but not while landing ot taxiing). The flight attendants will direct you to this list. American is the same way.

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quote:
Originally posted by BrianSnat:

I've used mine for calculating my speed while skiing (43 mph) and total vertical feet for the day (forget the exact number but it was in the mid 30 thousands).


 

Brian, since GPS uses triangulation between satelites is the speed accurate when going downhill? Wouldn't that just show you how fast you are moving forward, but not account for the speed of drop? Therefore if it said you were going 43 you were actually moving faster. If you knew the angle of drop you could calculate the speed.

 

Is my reasoning logical?

 

PSUPAUL of

Team Geo-Remdation

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> Brian, since GPS uses triangulation between satelites is the speed accurate when going downhill?

 

Actually, they use trilateration which is just like triangulation except with spheres instead of circles. Working in three dimensions doesn't care whether it's horizontal or vertical movement for the calculation of speed or distance. It's one point in 3D space to another point in 3D space. It should be as accurate for the vertical movent component as for the horizontal.

 

89355_500.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by Dad and the Dynamic Duo:

 

Though I do hang some unusual stuff from kites. Two weeks ago, we were with friends at the beach and I had only brought a mid-sized delta and no KAP gear. On of my friends broke his lawn chair so I put it on the line and sent it up. A chair 200 feet in the air tends to draw attention! icon_cool.gif

 

Shoot me an e-mail if I can help in any way. I know of some great resources that could help you get a rig in the air. For example, http://www.drachen.org/store_kits.html is a simple kit including the camera for $25USD.

 

George


 

That's really funny about the lawn chair. I guess from what I've read about KAP, I didn't realize that kites could lift that much weight. Everyone is always talking about making their rigs lighter and everything, I thought it was going to be a problem. I was actually going to start building a rig, but held off until I could research lighter materials. I guess I don't really need to worry about that to such a degree.

 

Also thanks for the link to the rig there. I'm still considering that, however I'll probably end up building a rig, since I want the convenience of being able to position the camera with servos and not have to bring it down to advance the film. I think I may have some servos laying around somewhere anyhow.

 

Mr. 0

 

"Remember that nature and the elements are neither your friend or your enemy - they are actually disinterested."

 

Department of the Army Field Manual FM 21-76 "Survival" Oct. 1970

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Geo Golf??? As you play a round of golf this weekend (instead of Geocaching...pleez not any more. Caching is more fun and I get more exercise than with golf!!) Mark each hole with a waypoint. Then next weekend, you can tell the distance to any hole. Great in club selection and answering the age old question of "who is away".

 

Bob ~

Early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese...

Isn't the best way to save face to keep the lower part shut?...Stephen Wright

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Did you know the average 767 Jet is going about 180-190 mph at the moment it leaves the ground. I know I was bad to have it on... my wife has caught me twice and made me turn it off.

 

---------------------------------------------------

frog.gif Free your mind and the rest will follow frog.gif

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a model rocket group near me has put eTrek Vistas in rockets to see the speed, hight, and path of the flight.

i thought that was cool, untill they told me they have lost 2 vistas to crashes.

 

i forgot to add, one guy puts a GPS III+ in an remote controlled plane for the same reasons.

 

[This message was edited by We3Dements on August 24, 2003 at 03:09 PM.]

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Does a GPSr actually work to measure speed in a model rocket? Since it travels more or less up and down, do GPSr measure speed w/ changes in altitude? I know that when you're riding in the car it'll obviously measure speed across land. I just haven't jumped off any cliffs w/ my GPS to see if it measured speed in a vertical plane.

 

Mr. 0

 

"Remember that nature and the elements are neither your friend or your enemy - they are actually disinterested."

 

Department of the Army Field Manual FM 21-76 "Survival" Oct. 1970

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I use it in my boat to see how fast it goes (electric motors, about 5.2MPH max), checked my speedometer error in my truck. I also like to set the house waypoint as a goto when returning from trips, 2 hours to go seems better than 120 miles for some reason.

I'm gonna clock my mower this weekend, what a great idea icon_smile.gif

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Sort of a spin on the husbands extramarital activity found out by the wife, one of my buddies was always bragging about getting a little on the side, taking advantage of lonely wives etc. He often left our company on boys night out, came back an hour or two later telling how good it was etc. Well one night I duct taped my GPSr to the inside of his tailgate, retrived it when he returned. Next day we followed the trail, damm, seemed he went to an erotic massage place, checked it out, Yep now he says pay for play is okay, you get to feel good all over and get a little extra rub for a $20.00 tip, not sure we agree but it was a laugh when we told him about it.

 

Gordon Parsons, Labrador

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Use of a gps is standard equipment in Hang Gliders, especially if you want to be picked up by your retrievers, I am sure Balloonists also use them. Gliders get good tracking of record flights, speed, path, distance and duration, not to mention taking the hot air out of altitude stories.

 

Having a device that records WHERE you were and can be saved is a really good thing...

 

NOW WHERE WAS THAT THERMAL?

 

geocan.jpg

 

Trash-out, EVERYtime

 

~~

 

Geo-cach-er, n. generally a highy technically competent person with lots of free time. (see also- "Unemployed", Computer administrator, aircraft technician- defense worker- dot-com executive- systems administrator, et.al)

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quote:
Originally posted by kristine bean:

quote:
Originally posted by Squatting Dog:

Anybody have any interesting stories of novel uses of GPS's?

 

For example, I recently heard of a woman that suspected her husband of seeing someone else, so she put a GPS in his car, then later retrieved it and followed the breadcrumbs to a motel.


 

 

HA! Now that's clever!


 

Check out this thread

 

Always wear proper caching safety equipment!

60748_1200.jpg

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