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real deal

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Everything posted by real deal

  1. We used our GPS to set up "azimuth markers" for setting up our beam antenna on Amateur (radio) Field Day ops.
  2. We used a transmitter that emitted a tone when somebody found our cache. When you opened the lid on the ammo can the plunger switch (now converted to roller tip)activated the device. The signal is only detected by a receiver hooked up to a scan recorder program on an old computer. Time, Day, Date and duration of lid opened was all recorded... We thought about recording what was said by the "finders" but we respect the laws governing private conversations and such. GOOD idea! We already had complications of getting a "radio bug cache" approved since it detracted from primarily using a GPS, Compass, Maps etc. The only way to get it approved is by indicating the use of GPS be the prime (but alternate) method of preference. For those who wish to use radio detection other than or in conjunction with GPS (etc.) by all means do so. Build it and they will come...GOOD LUCK! KD7KYU
  3. As long as callsign identification is made on BOTH bands used (during crossband repeat operations) every 10 minutes and at end of final transmission. There are auto ID "keyers" that can do this for you automatically and send out your callsign in code as well...neat!
  4. Icom 2100h (25n) operating in the green display mode...amber is too rough on the night vision goggles. Choice of antennae is a trunk lip mounted Radial/Larsen 5/8 nmo 150b. Sometimes I run the RadShack htx-200 for qrp. KD7KYU
  5. What do I carry? A pr-77, m60 machine gun, sometimes a barret light .50 cal, .45 cal a few grenades...oh wait, for Geocaching: I carry a Radshack htx-200 that holds 2 aa for 200mw or 9vdc external input for 2w, it covers 144-148 tx and 136-174 rx. I bought 4 of them on clearance for $25 each. I use my Garmin gps 12 for computations with a yellow etrex for backup. Extra batteries, bags for trash and cache. Lensatic compass,topmap, watch, notepad, pens and pencils/w sharpener, first aid kit, walking stick (also good for probing brush for caches) a positive attitude and a friendly smile. Do not forget to hydrate! In unfamiliar territory bring along another person or tell someone where you are going and expected time of return along with primary and secondary frequencies (radios used). Have a list of repeaters,their location and tone settings (if any)...repeater directory from ARRL helpful. Bring a hat to help protect you from the elements and critters...sunscreen and repellents if required. Greatly appreciate the website on the roll up 2m antennae (posted above). This site has a lot of information. Thank You! 73's and Happy geocaching- KD7KYU Even in familiar territory I still check out with others as a safety issue when going out alone. [This message was edited by real deal on July 02, 2003 at 09:19 AM.] [This message was edited by real deal on July 02, 2003 at 09:23 AM.]
  6. WoW! Code a relic? In amateur radio maybe, just depends who you ask and what answer you are looking for...but in commercial applications ie: Code is used for navigational purposes worldwide, even commercial and Militiary aircraft, for exchanging data. my personal answer is: There is no language barrier...it is known internationally by all radio operators as the "universal non-voice communication" even if they do not know how or what it means. I agree, there is still alot of mixed emotions by all who resent having the code part recinded for "techies" to play "walkie talkie". On the contrary, all "techies" who do pass their no-code exam have the opportunity to upgrade to "tech plus" by passing the code portion within 1 year. This opens up the opportunity for people who have turned away at the thought of becoming Amateurs simply because of not being "code friendly" or "genetically advantaged". With computers and cell phones being more on the rampant and crammed between low power junk called frs and gmrs...you will find us Amateurs caught between trying to almost salvage a relic of a hobby as well. I am proud to be an Amateur radio operator. I help others to study for their first license and share with them the knowledge for what has been given to me and researched on my own... no matter if they are "newbies" or "extra's". We all have to start somewhere and with a positive attitude and a desire is the hard part...the easy part is just doing it. Keep an open mind about code though... there are many methods of teaching and remembering...find the best one that suits your needs. I wish all those who want to pursue Amateur Radio that you are more than welcomed in doing so...I personally invite it. For those who are Amateurs, I appreciate your efforts in continuing the betterment of the hobby for the best interest of all... Best Wishes and Happy Geocaching! KD7KYU
  7. I don't feel that "50 plus Amateur Radio Operators, their families," ad nauseum are worthy of an Event Cache listing on Geocaching.com... This above quote was courtesy of Jeremy Irish...one of the administrators of an organization that call themselves Geocachers...who has not been informed of APRS. This so called "ad nauseum" is the predecessor of what we now enjoy as recreation... using a GPS to identify and locate individuals, equipment etc. by means of satellite technology and radio communications... Without this technology...by the way did I mention that the ARRL (Amateur Radio Relay League) put up the first APRS (Automated Positioning Radio System) which incorporated GPS (Ground Positioning System) for it's primary operating system? Be that it may 50 plus families is nothing compared to the other millions of individuals from all parts of the world that are Amateur radio operators... If indeed we are the "search engine" for "our" Geocache Society... let us not limit ourselves on how we can inform others about it...stopping ourselves short of having going commercialized by advertising sponsors...but to take advantage of the opportunity. Survey how many Geocachers are Amateur radio operators as well...now survey how many people that have not had the opportunity to be informed about Geocache.com and it's society who are Amateur radio operators... Now AD NAUSEUM!!!... By the way I had fun along with several other individuals at this event. Discussion of Geocaching was foremost the topic and even encited a few other people, not only amateurs, into Geocaching. We also used the GPS to set up various azimuths for antennae direction. It is really unfortunate that a prior posting of mine had been deleted overnight. It was a very cordial and sincere posting informing the people who dedicate their time and expertise to make Geocaching for what it is known today. If you are going to delete this message, then delete all the messages in this topic...
  8. I don't feel that "50 plus Amateur Radio Operators, their families," ad nauseum are worthy of an Event Cache listing on Geocaching.com... This above quote was courtesy of Jeremy Irish...one of the administrators of an organization that call themselves Geocachers...who has not been informed of APRS. This so called "ad nauseum" is the predecessor of what we now enjoy as recreation... using a GPS to identify and locate individuals, equipment etc. by means of satellite technology and radio communications... Without this technology...by the way did I mention that the ARRL (Amateur Radio Relay League) put up the first APRS (Automated Positioning Radio System) which incorporated GPS (Ground Positioning System) for it's primary operating system? Be that it may 50 plus families is nothing compared to the other millions of individuals from all parts of the world that are Amateur radio operators... If indeed we are the "search engine" for "our" Geocache Society... let us not limit ourselves on how we can inform others about it...stopping ourselves short of having going commercialized by advertising sponsors...but to take advantage of the opportunity. Survey how many Geocachers are Amateur radio operators as well...now survey how many people that have not had the opportunity to be informed about Geocache.com and it's society who are Amateur radio operators... Now AD NAUSEUM!!!... By the way I had fun along with several other individuals at this event. Discussion of Geocaching was foremost the topic and even encited a few other people, not only amateurs, into Geocaching. We also used the GPS to set up various azimuths for antennae direction. It is really unfortunate that a prior posting of mine had been deleted overnight. It was a very cordial and sincere posting informing the people who dedicate their time and expertise to make Geocaching for what it is known today. If you are going to delete this message, then delete all the messages in this topic...
  9. I don't feel that "50 plus Amateur Radio Operators, their families," ad nauseum are worthy of an Event Cache listing on Geocaching.com... This above quote was courtesy of Jeremy Irish...one of the administrators of an organization that call themselves Geocachers...who has not been informed of APRS. This so called "ad nauseum" is the predecessor of what we now enjoy as recreation... using a GPS to identify and locate individuals, equipment etc. by means of satellite technology and radio communications... Without this technology...by the way did I mention that the ARRL (Amateur Radio Relay League) put up the first APRS (Automated Positioning Radio System) which incorporated GPS (Ground Positioning System) for it's primary operating system? Be that it may 50 plus families is nothing compared to the other millions of individuals from all parts of the world that are Amateur radio operators... If indeed we are the "search engine" for "our" Geocache Society... let us not limit ourselves on how we can inform others about it...stopping ourselves short of having going commercialized by advertising sponsors...but to take advantage of the opportunity. Survey how many Geocachers are Amateur radio operators as well...now survey how many people that have not had the opportunity to be informed about Geocache.com and it's society who are Amateur radio operators... Now AD NAUSEUM!!!... By the way I had fun along with several other individuals at this event. Discussion of Geocaching was foremost the topic and even encited a few other people, not only amateurs, into Geocaching. We also used the GPS to set up various azimuths for antennae direction. It is really unfortunate that a prior posting of mine had been deleted overnight. It was a very cordial and sincere posting informing the people who dedicate their time and expertise to make Geocaching for what it is known today. If you are going to delete this message, then delete all the messages in this topic...
  10. It is unfortunate that some people blame the FCC for the degredation of the CB bands, when in fact, the citizens are responsible for following the Part 15 rules and regulations. Now that GMRS is being targeted for licensing only responsible people are going to register for their licence. I throw this stuff away...along with FRS and MURS! With the new no code tech licencse available for $10 (application/license fee) for 10 years is even more beneficial for people who want to have better communications along with variety of transmitting modes. You would also have the use of repeaters (besides simplex)which there is no charge to air-time or their use and the ability to communicate with other amateurs as well. The majority of Geocachers that I have met also had a Amateur license as well...ever hear of APERS? The first APERS satellite using GPS technology was sent into orbit by Amateur radio operators. I do have to agree, however, that the FCC did not do any favors by releasing the once known amateur 11 meters to the public to be known as the "Children's Band" to this day. Only the honest people will remain honest...Happy Geocaching and 73's to all. Sincerely, KD7KYU
  11. I had a great time finding both of W7WT's caches (PSE) even though they were archived. I quit "counting smilies" as I am in this just for the fun and adventure. We should be fortunate that certain individuals dedicate their time and resources for making Geocaching for what it has evolved into...I remember everybody starting out just typing words in plain black and white...now we have full blown HTML colored cache pages that contain a variety of hyperlinks. Unfortunately, as progressive we all have become to making Geocaching for what it is today, we will invaribly encounter more problems along the way...Let us remember that there is strength in unity. I helped W7WT set up his 6 meter station and oriented various antennae azimuths by way of GPS. I want to thank W7WT for inviting me out for the cache event as I would not have even given it a thought to bring my GPS...I found it very useful...in any event. By the way: the very first satellite put into orbit using GPS technology was by the Amateur Radio Relay League for locating individuals, equipment and specific location. This was called Amateur Positioning Emergency Radio System and is used still to this day. I want to thank all those who have participated together for keeping up the website...
  12. if a cache is lost,stolen,animalized etc. and thus located from one coordinate but in the same Park name to another should the old cache site be archived? How about points...should the people that have already visited the old cache site and name be allowed to get a point for finding the new cache site location? And howabout turning a one step single cache into a multicache level, should people get an additional point?And finally how about those individuals who claim to have not found the cache because of it being victim given a point from the hider just because they were there?even better changing the cache from behind a rock and then resecuring it "better" in a tree in the same acceptable cache site location (original placement)....???????????????????????????
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