Jump to content

Options for logging 100-200 caches after long trips.


Annie & PB
Followers 3

Recommended Posts

At the end of next month we are going on a long holiday (vacation) and expect to find maybe 200 plus caches.

What options do people use for when you get back from a trip with a heap of caches to log??

 

I've been playing with the GSAK macros CachmateLogging and PPC_CachemateLog but I can't get either of them to work as I am not that computer literate.

 

Are there any other methods that people use that might be easier to learn (other than a boring cut and paste log that is the same for each cache!)

 

Annie

Link to comment

At the end of next month we are going on a long holiday (vacation) and expect to find maybe 200 plus caches.

What options do people use for when you get back from a trip with a heap of caches to log??

 

I've been playing with the GSAK macros CachmateLogging and PPC_CachemateLog but I can't get either of them to work as I am not that computer literate.

 

Are there any other methods that people use that might be easier to learn (other than a boring cut and paste log that is the same for each cache!)

 

Annie

 

First I want to thank you for being considerate enough to avoid cut and paste logs. As a cache owner, I appreciate original logs. :lol:

 

I've heard of cachers investing in digital recorders to make voice notes for each cache they find. Another option is a notebook. For each cache you find, record the GC # (not the name) then write a sentence or two about the cache. A digital camera could be used to take an image of ground zero to further refresh your memories of each cache.

Link to comment

At the end of next month we are going on a long holiday (vacation) and expect to find maybe 200 plus caches.

What options do people use for when you get back from a trip with a heap of caches to log??

 

I've been playing with the GSAK macros CachmateLogging and PPC_CachemateLog but I can't get either of them to work as I am not that computer literate.

 

Are there any other methods that people use that might be easier to learn (other than a boring cut and paste log that is the same for each cache!)

 

Annie

 

I absolutely agree. And this is what I do. However I am hoping to write my usual unique logs in CacheMate (or what ever) while we are away, and then once normal life has resumed when we return home, transfer my logs on to the website via the quickest way possible. If I have to write 200 plus logs when I get home they WILL NOT be able to be long or unique due to the time constrains for my life/new job when we return!!!

 

Annie

Link to comment

At the end of next month we are going on a long holiday (vacation) and expect to find maybe 200 plus caches.

What options do people use for when you get back from a trip with a heap of caches to log??

 

I've been playing with the GSAK macros CachmateLogging and PPC_CachemateLog but I can't get either of them to work as I am not that computer literate.

 

Are there any other methods that people use that might be easier to learn (other than a boring cut and paste log that is the same for each cache!)

 

Annie

 

First I want to thank you for being considerate enough to avoid cut and paste logs. As a cache owner, I appreciate original logs. :lol:

 

I've heard of cachers investing in digital recorders to make voice notes for each cache they find. Another option is a notebook. For each cache you find, record the GC # (not the name) then write a sentence or two about the cache. A digital camera could be used to take an image of ground zero to further refresh your memories of each cache.

 

thanks Kit Fox! I don't like seeing copy and paste logs, and I've never yet used them.

We do have a notebook and take photos at almost every cache already - but neither of those is going to cut down on the actual hours of logging needed when we get home.

 

Annie

Link to comment

We have a number of road trips planned next year, so I was thrilled when someone pointed out coord.info to me. I simply plan on submitting field notes for the caches and log them when I can.

 

Can you explain this option more - I thought field notes were only an option if you have an Oregon or colarado GPS or something like that?? How does the whole process work?

 

Annie

Link to comment

thanks Kit Fox! I don't like seeing copy and paste logs, and I've never yet used them.

We do have a notebook and take photos at almost every cache already - but neither of those is going to cut down on the actual hours of logging needed when we get home.

 

Annie

 

Think of the time it takes to log your caches as a chance to re-enjoy your trip. After a big trip, logging my finds is a nice re-hash of my experience.

 

For some, geocaches are nothing more than a smiley. Team Alamo (#1 in the world) told me at an event, that he uses a logging program for his finds. Other than the occasional original log, the majority of his logs "suck." They are nothing more than an incremental log with zero originality.

Edited by Kit Fox
Link to comment

At the end of next month we are going on a long holiday (vacation) and expect to find maybe 200 plus caches.

What options do people use for when you get back from a trip with a heap of caches to log??

 

I've been playing with the GSAK macros CachmateLogging and PPC_CachemateLog but I can't get either of them to work as I am not that computer literate.

 

Are there any other methods that people use that might be easier to learn (other than a boring cut and paste log that is the same for each cache!)

 

Annie

 

I assume your trying paperless. What type of PDA do you have? Cachematelogging is for a palm and PPC_cachematelog is for a PPC. Cachematelogging is pretty simple to use.

 

export your caches, on the cachemate export use either %code or %smart for the cachemate waypoint. I prefer %code. hot sync the palm and import the database.

 

Cache and log your caches. Make sure when you check the log box on the log page the cache is changed from unfiled to found (this can be changed by going to and individual cache, tapping the cachmate on the upper left, selecting options and then view options. check set hunt and end time and set catagory, select found from the drop down.)

 

come home, hot sync your palm. Start cachematelogging. Since you used %code for the export make sure you use %code for match. (Or if you use %smart make sure it matches in both export and import)

 

You should be able to step through the caches one at a time, on the cache log page left click in the log area and then right click and paste your pda log.

 

There is a hopefully helpful help file with the macro. If you have any more questions give a shout.

 

Jim

Link to comment

We have a number of road trips planned next year, so I was thrilled when someone pointed out coord.info to me. I simply plan on submitting field notes for the caches and log them when I can.

 

Can you explain this option more - I thought field notes were only an option if you have an Oregon or colarado GPS or something like that?? How does the whole process work?

 

Annie

 

If you visit http://coord.info there's directions to post field notes using your phone and text messages (follow the link under 'The Beta Part').

 

This may or may not suit your needs as I assume there is some limit to the amount of text you could include in the field notes, either by the text message limit or by the service.

Link to comment

At the end of next month we are going on a long holiday (vacation) and expect to find maybe 200 plus caches.

What options do people use for when you get back from a trip with a heap of caches to log??

 

I've been playing with the GSAK macros CachmateLogging and PPC_CachemateLog but I can't get either of them to work as I am not that computer literate.

 

Are there any other methods that people use that might be easier to learn (other than a boring cut and paste log that is the same for each cache!)

 

Annie

 

I assume your trying paperless. What type of PDA do you have? Cachematelogging is for a palm and PPC_cachematelog is for a PPC. Cachematelogging is pretty simple to use.

 

export your caches, on the cachemate export use either %code or %smart for the cachemate waypoint. I prefer %code. hot sync the palm and import the database.

 

Cache and log your caches. Make sure when you check the log box on the log page the cache is changed from unfiled to found (this can be changed by going to and individual cache, tapping the cachmate on the upper left, selecting options and then view options. check set hunt and end time and set catagory, select found from the drop down.)

 

come home, hot sync your palm. Start cachematelogging. Since you used %code for the export make sure you use %code for match. (Or if you use %smart make sure it matches in both export and import)

 

You should be able to step through the caches one at a time, on the cache log page left click in the log area and then right click and paste your pda log.

 

There is a hopefully helpful help file with the macro. If you have any more questions give a shout.

 

Jim

 

Hi jholly!!!

 

Yes - I just figured out today that your macro is the one I need, but truely I am too computer illiterate to get it to work. :lol::lol::( I've read a bunch of threads at the GSAK forum where you have helped out people, and read the help notes, but I still don't get what I need to do. Plus I do use the FindStatsGen macro to create our stats, and I think I read a comment that if I use the logging macro our logs won't stay in the right order???? (Mind you I've read so many posts today that I could have that completely wrong.) Which is particularly important as sometimes during this trip we will hit 1000 caches, which is a fairly big deal in NZ, and I will want it correctly recorded in our profile stats.

 

Annie

Link to comment

 

If you visit http://coord.info there's directions to post field notes using your phone and text messages (follow the link under 'The Beta Part').

 

This may or may not suit your needs as I assume there is some limit to the amount of text you could include in the field notes, either by the text message limit or by the service.

 

Drat and bother - if it involves texting it probably won't work here in NZ and it would be outside our budget if it did!!! :lol:

 

Thanks for your help.

 

Annie

Link to comment

 

If you visit http://coord.info there's directions to post field notes using your phone and text messages (follow the link under 'The Beta Part').

 

This may or may not suit your needs as I assume there is some limit to the amount of text you could include in the field notes, either by the text message limit or by the service.

 

Drat and bother - if it involves texting it probably won't work here in NZ and it would be outside our budget if it did!!! :lol:

 

Thanks for your help.

 

Annie

 

Ah, sorry, I didn't even think of that possibility!

Link to comment

Hi jholly!!!

 

Yes - I just figured out today that your macro is the one I need, but truely I am too computer illiterate to get it to work. :lol::lol::( I've read a bunch of threads at the GSAK forum where you have helped out people, and read the help notes, but I still don't get what I need to do. Plus I do use the FindStatsGen macro to create our stats, and I think I read a comment that if I use the logging macro our logs won't stay in the right order???? (Mind you I've read so many posts today that I could have that completely wrong.) Which is particularly important as sometimes during this trip we will hit 1000 caches, which is a fairly big deal in NZ, and I will want it correctly recorded in our profile stats.

 

Annie

 

The issue with logging order has to do with milestones. Your milestones won't be in the correct order if you don't log in the correct order. You can use the editor in FSG to straighten things out, but that can be a drag if you have alot. FSG orders the finds by logid which can only be gotten from GC.com AFTER you log the find. Version 1.2.01 of the macro allows you to run RefreshAllGPX to update with your logids. The other way is to not run FSG until you have your MyFinds PQ and loaded that. And for a couple hundred finds I would probably skip the RefreshAllGPX and do the MyFinds PQ route.

 

If you log as you find them and keep the time right, cachematelogging will step you through the caches in the correct order so you should have things correct on GC.com. I have not found any problems over hundreds of caches with the macro not getting things in the correct order if I logged in the correct order.

 

I would be happy to step you through using it, but unless someone else chimes in we can do it off line via email.

 

And I wish you luck on reaching 1,000. I did it a couple weeks ago at the Lily Pad.

 

Jim

Link to comment

Hi jholly!!!

 

Yes - I just figured out today that your macro is the one I need, but truely I am too computer illiterate to get it to work. :lol::lol::( I've read a bunch of threads at the GSAK forum where you have helped out people, and read the help notes, but I still don't get what I need to do. Plus I do use the FindStatsGen macro to create our stats, and I think I read a comment that if I use the logging macro our logs won't stay in the right order???? (Mind you I've read so many posts today that I could have that completely wrong.) Which is particularly important as sometimes during this trip we will hit 1000 caches, which is a fairly big deal in NZ, and I will want it correctly recorded in our profile stats.

 

Annie

 

The issue with logging order has to do with milestones. Your milestones won't be in the correct order if you don't log in the correct order. You can use the editor in FSG to straighten things out, but that can be a drag if you have alot. FSG orders the finds by logid which can only be gotten from GC.com AFTER you log the find. Version 1.2.01 of the macro allows you to run RefreshAllGPX to update with your logids. The other way is to not run FSG until you have your MyFinds PQ and loaded that. And for a couple hundred finds I would probably skip the RefreshAllGPX and do the MyFinds PQ route.

 

If you log as you find them and keep the time right, cachematelogging will step you through the caches in the correct order so you should have things correct on GC.com. I have not found any problems over hundreds of caches with the macro not getting things in the correct order if I logged in the correct order.

 

I would be happy to step you through using it, but unless someone else chimes in we can do it off line via email.

 

And I wish you luck on reaching 1,000. I did it a couple weeks ago at the Lily Pad.

 

Jim

 

Ah, that is fine then! I am pretty anal about logging our caches in the correct order (that is partly why the paper notebook and photos!) and I do use the MyFinds PQ to get our info from, so it sounds like our milestones will be fine!!

 

I will send you an email but may not be for an hour or two.

 

Thanks

Annie

 

PS We just released a Frog TB this weekend that is heading for the Lily Pad as we will never get there ourselves!!

Link to comment

ChileHead and Mikenaddeo - thanks for your suggestions! I never knew there were so many options!

Unfortunately anything requiring cellphones is outside our budget here in New Zealand, and also the kind of areas that we like to cache in, there usually isn't any coverage anyway.

 

Thanks again

Annie

Link to comment
I do it one at a time, the old fashioned way. I think each cache owner deserves a unique log.
That is a good rule but there are exceptions to that rule (for me at least). I write longer logs for caches that are really fun and short logs for the ones I can't remember. I also take photos of the fun caches along with a photo of my GPS showing the GC number for that cache. It makes it easy to remember the fun ones when I log because the photos are time and date stamped as well. Edited by TrailGators
Link to comment

We have a number of road trips planned next year, so I was thrilled when someone pointed out coord.info to me. I simply plan on submitting field notes for the caches and log them when I can.

 

Can you explain this option more - I thought field notes were only an option if you have an Oregon or colarado GPS or something like that?? How does the whole process work?

 

Annie

 

Thats generally what I do; copy and paste my CacheMate or CacheBerry field notes once I'm done. Once pasted and submitted, you end up with a searchable "GC...." box and copy/paste the next one in and so on.

Probably can do about 3 to 4 a minute (if gc.com is being nice).

After that's done, I can go back and post the pictures I took if there are any..

Link to comment

When I'm on a trip, I log like this...

 

First paragraph, tell the story of the trip. Where I'm going, why I'm going there, is it on the motorcycle, who is with me?

 

Second paragraph... tell about this day of the trip. Where we started the day, where we ended the day, weather, anything interesting we saw...

 

Third paragraph... tell something about the visit to the cache. I've seen/never seen this hide before... place was interesting... cool story/history.. someone in my traveling party did/said/thought something interesting...

 

That way I cut and paste some of it but each cache still gets a unique log.

 

That's how I do it. YMMV.

Link to comment

I love all these ideas for ways to make it easier to log lots of caches.

 

I live in a town that gets lots of tourists, and I watch a few of the local caches just because they are on my way to work and I can swing by and spiffy things up if need be.

 

Nothing is worse than getting two dozen emails that all say something like "Me and Snortles found this one while we was in town on a wild cachign spree"

Link to comment

I just got done finding 175 caches this weekend. I still enter them the old fashioned way, one at a time. Each one is a unique log as are all 10,000 of my finds, no copy-paste here. I have yet to really find a better method myself. There are faster options, just not easier. I'll stick with the tried and true until something better comes along.

Link to comment

thanks Kit Fox! I don't like seeing copy and paste logs, and I've never yet used them.

We do have a notebook and take photos at almost every cache already - but neither of those is going to cut down on the actual hours of logging needed when we get home.

 

Annie

 

Think of the time it takes to log your caches as a chance to re-enjoy your trip. After a big trip, logging my finds is a nice re-hash of my experience.

 

For some, geocaches are nothing more than a smiley. Team Alamo (#1 in the world) told me at an event, that he uses a logging program for his finds. Other than the occasional original log, the majority of his logs "suck." They are nothing more than an incremental log with zero originality.

 

Ditto KF's thoughts 100%. I've been on lots of 100+ runs and even several 300+ caching trips, and am in no hurry to get things logged when I get home. Granted some of my finds may not be all that memorable, so the logs for those won't be that original. But I really enjoy remembering the ones that stood out as I am typing my logs. If I've got my laptop I'll use the notes feature, or I'll enter a few items in the notes field in my 60c to help me remember.

 

I find that my effort in logging is proportional to the hider's effort in placing the cache for me to find. But when we are on numbers runs, there are bound to be a few lampposts and parking lots on our routes. Although this past summer's trip to GW6 included a run through Silicon Valley and it was pretty cool to see the names of so many recognizable companies in those parking lots along our route.

Edited by wimseyguy
Link to comment

LordEd and I have a laptop that we take with us and we just use notepad to document each cache as a find, not found, and some details so we don't forget what we did. Makes it easier to go back on what you did and log. That and we nearly always stay at hotels/motels that have wireless internet so we can log at the end of each day. Being from southern British Columbia there are not many areas where the cache concentration is high so our weekend record is only 40. We're planning a caching trip next year up from Kelowna, BC to Edmonton, AB down to Calgary and back home. Should get a few hundred caches if we're lucky.

Edited by anakerose
Link to comment

 

For some, geocaches are nothing more than a smiley. Team Alamo (#1 in the world) told me at an event, that he uses a logging program for his finds. Other than the occasional original log, the majority of his logs "suck." They are nothing more than an incremental log with zero originality.

 

I agree with your earlier post about individual logs. I can usually pull that off after a 100 cache weekend save for some that left not enough of an impression for me to remember them.

 

As to VDBAlamo, I can easily give him a pass because of the entertainment value of the social experiment that includes finding 30000 caches in six years.

Link to comment

I think the option I'd use is a microsoft office word document (or similar) :D

 

I'd pretty much do it like this:

 

GC****

TFTC - cool spot etc etc

 

GC***

Cache missing etc etc

 

GC****

Great cache idea

 

and so on

 

This way you'll have them all in order and you can just type in the GC code when you get home and cut and paste the logs but they'll all be unique. You could do this on the palm you are using too using the memo field (or similar), then when you get back, transfer to your computer and slowly start logging one by one.

 

It's an idea at least - and I KNOW you'd get it in the right order then. I know how big a deal 1000 will be :D I just reached 100 and 1000 is just around the corner ;)

Link to comment

At the end of the day or trip, it's pretty easy to remember most of the big details about such the way they were hidden. If you find several similar hides, it's hard to recall the small details.

 

I carry a PDA with me to look up cache info. I tend to make a short note on the PDA in the note section that looks much like what imperfected suggests. In a pinch, I've even put those notes on the notes field of my 60CSx, although sometimes that involves shorthand.

 

It only takes a second to record:

 

full log book

bit dampish

needs gasket

good ice cream shop nearby

tree fell across road

met park ranger

 

And then when I log, if my memory is fuzzy, I can pull up that record. I know there is a way to pull them up off the gps in GSAK, but I've never used it.

Link to comment

In a pinch, I've even put those notes on the notes field of my 60CSx, although sometimes that involves shorthand.

It never occurred to me to use that notes field. It woudl be kind of tedious though. I carry a little notepad and write the time, date, waypoint ID, and a quick note to help me remember.

Link to comment

In a pinch, I've even put those notes on the notes field of my 60CSx, although sometimes that involves shorthand.

It never occurred to me to use that notes field. It woudl be kind of tedious though. I carry a little notepad and write the time, date, waypoint ID, and a quick note to help me remember.

I agree completely. I've never been happy with using a PDA, GSAK's note field, other computer software, Geocache Navigator field notes, etc. All of these options take more time than jotting down the info. on a stenographer pad that I keep tucked next to the driver's seat. I've also lost the data from two marathon caching trips due to PDA crashes, so this perhaps prejudices me.

 

Using that pad, I have a fairly complete record of my geocaching activities for the past year. It's fun to go back and re-read the raw data sometimes. And, a notebook never suffers an accidental reboot or a file corruption -- so long as I don't lose the notebook. As a backup, I do put a checkmark in the "found" column in GSAK, as I keep my laptop running in the car. That action takes just a second.

 

This technique has worked well for me on marathon trips with 100's of cache finds. I do all my logging when I'm back at home, at times when I can't go caching. The logging experience thus extends the fun and good memories of the time spent in the field. With good notes, it's easy to remember which cache is which, and to say something unique about each one. I open with a copy & paste introduction that sets the scene for that caching expedition, then a customized paragraph for that hunt, and then I close with a thank-you sentence. My average log length is greater than 100 words.

 

On long trips, I would *like* to be able to log my finds at night from my hotel room. But, Keystone always hogs the laptop when I'm not caching. ;)

 

Santa brought me an iPhone so for 2009 I will be trying out the field notes method via iPhone. It is a lot friendlier than a PDA or my old cellphone with Trimble Geocache Navigator.

Link to comment

 

I agree completely. I've never been happy with using a PDA, GSAK's note field, other computer software, Geocache Navigator field notes, etc. All of these options take more time than jotting down the info. on a stenographer pad that I keep tucked next to the driver's seat. I've also lost the data from two marathon caching trips due to PDA crashes, so this perhaps prejudices me.

 

I am happy to hear these comments. I, too, find the hand written method for cache-a-thons and vacation caching to be the most effective.

 

Using that pad, I have a fairly complete record of my geocaching activities for the past year. It's fun to go back and re-read the raw data sometimes...

 

Yep, too. Three times I have relived my favorite cache trip back in December of 2003. Four driving days from Seattle to Las Vegas to meet geocacher Roadcow and to be witnesses at their Drive-Thru wedding at the Chapel Of Vows on the strip - Sagefox and Roadcow vans parked side-by-side at the driveup window. Reading the entries for each cache stop reminds me of the great adventure. Rain, snow, disturbing naked lovers at the snowed-in headwaters of the Sacramento River, then the relative warmth of the Mojave desert. A great time.

Link to comment

thank you, thank you, THANK YOU for not stooping to cut-and-paste.

 

not too long ago i was looking at some logs that had been pasted for every dingle one of the bazillion caches this person had visited. it included a line about caching with friends in the "lovely vermont area", despite the fact that some of the logs were as far west as UTICA.

 

go ahead, ask someone from utica if they consider themselves to be living in the "lovely vermont area".

 

i think every time someone leaves a log like that, FIVE finds ought to be deducted from their total.

 

 

but seriously.

 

last october i went on a road trip and found a lot of caches. i took a lot of pictures and kept some rudimentary notes and when i came home i logged all of the caches the old fashioned way.

 

it was worth the effort.

 

i especially appreciate it when people who find a lot of caches take the time to tell the story of what happened.

Link to comment

At the end of next month we are going on a long holiday (vacation) and expect to find maybe 200 plus caches.

What options do people use for when you get back from a trip with a heap of caches to log??

 

I've been playing with the GSAK macros CachmateLogging and PPC_CachemateLog but I can't get either of them to work as I am not that computer literate.

 

Are there any other methods that people use that might be easier to learn (other than a boring cut and paste log that is the same for each cache!)

 

Annie

How many caches per day do you expect to log? What tech do you have access to? A PDA? Depending on the answers, I may have a much better solution than the GSAK macro.

Link to comment

I carry a little notepad and write the time, date, waypoint ID, and a quick note to help me remember.

 

Yup. A good old-fashioned "word processor" does the trick. Generally a couple of words is all that it takes, along with, perhaps, a look at the cache page (one of the failures of the "Field Notes" option) and/or a look at the cache site via Mappoint Birdseye view or Google StreetView.

 

My friend, Bobcam, who is currently the top cacher as far as average caches found per time caching, never fails to write personal logs, with at least minimal uniqute detail about the find. I really admire his ability to do that, but a well-organized mind (MUCH more so than my own) helps him a lot. Myself, I either need paper, or fewer finds per day.

Link to comment

I agree completely. I've never been happy with using a PDA, GSAK's note field, other computer software, Geocache Navigator field notes, etc. All of these options take more time than jotting down the info. on a stenographer pad that I keep tucked next to the driver's seat. I've also lost the data from two marathon caching trips due to PDA crashes, so this perhaps prejudices me.

 

Using that pad, I have a fairly complete record of my geocaching activities for the past year. It's fun to go back and re-read the raw data sometimes. And, a notebook never suffers an accidental reboot or a file corruption -- so long as I don't lose the notebook. As a backup, I do put a checkmark in the "found" column in GSAK, as I keep my laptop running in the car. That action takes just a second.

 

I find it to be a waste of time trying to type notes on my PDA. A notepad is what I prefer. This is one of those occasions where "old" technology works far better than "new" technology. Having had a PDA crash before, I feel your pain.

Link to comment

At the end of next month we are going on a long holiday (vacation) and expect to find maybe 200 plus caches.

What options do people use for when you get back from a trip with a heap of caches to log??

 

I've been playing with the GSAK macros CachmateLogging and PPC_CachemateLog but I can't get either of them to work as I am not that computer literate.

 

Are there any other methods that people use that might be easier to learn (other than a boring cut and paste log that is the same for each cache!)

 

Annie

 

The boring method "#1 of 200 TFTC" is the fallback. It at least says, "The cache is there".

The better method would be to log after each run while you can remember the individual caches so you can crank out an individual log. It can be short. "Nice park, good cache, contents dry, we stopped for a soda at the nearby quickie mart".

 

Another method is to take notes so you can come closer to the non boring method when you finally can log. I do this when I'm on a long cache trip. Looks like others do as well. Punching junk into a PDA is a PITA. Now if you had a laptop to take a quick note in the car that may work well.

Link to comment

I've taken at least 2 trips in the past few years where I've had my GPS and PDA stocked with over 200 caches that I wanted to find, and was a little worried about the same thing you are.

 

When I got back from each trip, it took surprisingly less time to log the 20 or so caches that I actually had time to find than I'd feared. :D:D

 

Finding caches along a route adds a lot more time to a trip than people realize, even if you limit yourself to the caches within a half mile. After a dozen stops or so you realize the 6 hour drive will become a 10 hour trip, and will take days if you keep caching at the same rate, so you decide to be satisfied with what you've found in order to get where you're going.

 

After you're there you realize the non-cachers in your group aren't letting you have enough time to find the 100+ caches that you wanted to find, and you end up getting 5 or 10, maybe. That's assuming that your trip is for some non-caching purpose and you've decided to cache some while you're on the trip.

 

The drive home has even less stops for caches because you're just tired and ready to be home.

 

At least that's how it's been for me. Your Mileage May Vary.

Link to comment

Look at jott.com; it's a speech-to-text service that you can access through a regular old cell phone. At each cache, make a call to jott with your comments. When you get home, cut & paste the text it transcribed into the log.

 

Hmmm, very interesting. I've signed up for the free trial week and then the $13 monthly option (that will give me unlimited voice to text service). Normally after each find I go back to my car and write my notes in GSAK on my laptop. That means everybody else who's with me is forced to sit there for 5 minutes while I get my logs typed since I'm the only driver (if I don't get my thoughts down very quickly I forget which caches I've visited and what the experience was like thanks to being on some pretty heavy duty medications). While the JOTT service is not perfect in translating voice to text it certainly seems to do good enough so I'll be able to just call Jott and dictate my notes while walking back to my car and not making others wait while I type in my notes. Once I get home and check my E-Mail then I can tweak the Jott notes to make sure it's saying what I really intended and then just cut and paste my log right into geocaching.com . While I'm not thrilled with paying $13 a month if it will get me away from manually typing my notes after every cache then it will be worth it. Less time typing while out caching means more time for caching so I think I'll probably end up loving it. :P

Link to comment

My missus and I recently did a 29 day, close to 9000km caching trip by motorbike, with 372 finds and god only knows how many DNF's on the trip. We also carried a travel bug with us for the entire trip that is owned by a group of school kids from Pennsylvania, which we dropped and retrieved into caches along the way, so they could follow our trip- it was, and is a geography lesson on Australia. We also maintained a blog during the trip.

We carried a laptop and mobile broadband modem, and logged caches each night, sometimes up to 30 in a go. I admit a lot were cut and paste entries with the generic info, but then each entry was edited to suit the find or DNF. This was heaps better than in the past, where logging a couple of hundred finds took days and days. Even so, very late nights became common.

 

Cheers

Bundy

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 3
×
×
  • Create New...