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My Most Brainless Act While Geocaching


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Been off the forums for a few months and just hopped back on the bandwagon today. Got to reading some of the posts and realized many of the responses were obvious answers, but just hadn't occurred to the OP yet. So I was just wondering...what's the most brainless idea you've had or thing you've done in the realm of geocaching?

 

I would say mine would be that wonderful idea I had of placing a cachet of rice inside my geocache containers as a hand-made humidity control. Fortunately one of the first few finders commented that the rice was a lure for rodents, which I would have known had I looked at it from that angle. Duh :blink:

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Was standing on a rock outcropping after climbing to a cache that the CO said you had to rappel too. Cache parter was ahead of me with the cache. I was one level lower. He threw the cache to me to get a picture and then wanted me to throw it back. I had just had rotator cuff surgery and my feet were about hip high and my back on a tree. I told him to lower the rope he had in his backback, but he didn't want to get it out. I figured that if I didnt' make the throw that I would just catch the ammo can, like I did when he threw it to me, since the rock wall was "V"ed filtering right to me. I will just say that an ammo can makes a very distinct noise while bouncing 150' down a canyon into a small river. Also, the maniacal laughter of your caching partner is very eerie in said canyon. I'm not sure which decision was worse. Trying to throw the can to him, or caching with him. It was 30 degrees F out, and I climbed down to the river and the way the river cut through the rocks, I had to cross 3 times to get to the cache in the mud. He finally decided to get out the 150' rope, he had to climb down to where I threw the can from and I could just reach the rope end and tie it on the handle. He pulled it up. I was FREEZING and said I'd be right up to help, but he said he could just loop the rope through the handle and whip it back onto the ledge where it was originally, then just let go of one side of the rope and pull it back. Sounded good to my frozen brain and I crossed 3 times again and took the easier way back to the trail about 250' away. I will just say that the ammo can made the exact same noise bouncing 150' down the canyon into the middle of the small river. Also, the maniacal laughter sounded exactly the same. I gotta find new caching partners. The handle broke off, so we made it into a TB for the CO and bought him a new ammo can. Luckily he got a kick out of it.

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One winter, I got a terrible case of cabin fever and decided to look for some caches at a state park about 30 miles from home in spite of a forecast of freezing rain and sleet. For a change, the forecast was accurate, but I still found a dozen caches. By mid-afternoon, I found myself at a little-known nature preserve in Newark, Ohio, where there were two caches I wanted to go for. I'd never been to the facility, and had difficulty finding an entrance.

 

After a bit of driving around, I found what certainly looked like an entrance road. It even had a "Welcome" sign. I turned my trusty SUV into the aforementioned road, and drove maybe 1,000 feet before I realized the "road" was getting a tad too narrow for my vehicle. That was when it dawned on me that I was driving on what was actually a walking trail, not intended for anything larger than a riding mower.

 

OK, no problem, I'll just back out slowly. Did I mention that this road/trail was covered with snow and ice? Did I also mention that I'm still terrible at backing after all these years of driving? The next thing I knew, I felt the passenger-side wheels dropping off the side of the trail. Right after that, the entire vehicle slid sideways into a gully, with boulders directly in front of and directly behind the vehicle. My cachemobile was trapped about 15 feet below the trail, tilted at a 30-degree angle, which at least felt as if it could overturn if I made the wrong move.

 

Well, here's another fine mess I've gotten myself into. :blink:

 

To make a long story a bit shorter, two employees of the facility spotted my car and used a cell phone to call for a tow truck. Two hours and a $200 extrication later, my car was back on solid footing. Miraculously, there was no damage at all to the vehicle, and I had somehow missed destroying some exotic plants that were hidden under the snow in that area.

 

I figured that was enough excitement for one day. It was another six months before I got back to that nature preserve and finally found those two caches. In late summer, it was easy to tell that the "road" I'd tried driving down was anything but.

 

--Larry

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Was standing on a rock outcropping after climbing to a cache that the CO said you had to rappel too. Cache parter was ahead of me with the cache. I was one level lower. He threw the cache to me to get a picture and then wanted me to throw it back. I had just had rotator cuff surgery and my feet were about hip high and my back on a tree. I told him to lower the rope he had in his backback, but he didn't want to get it out. I figured that if I didnt' make the throw that I would just catch the ammo can, like I did when he threw it to me, since the rock wall was "V"ed filtering right to me. I will just say that an ammo can makes a very distinct noise while bouncing 150' down a canyon into a small river. Also, the maniacal laughter of your caching partner is very eerie in said canyon. I'm not sure which decision was worse. Trying to throw the can to him, or caching with him. It was 30 degrees F out, and I climbed down to the river and the way the river cut through the rocks, I had to cross 3 times to get to the cache in the mud. He finally decided to get out the 150' rope, he had to climb down to where I threw the can from and I could just reach the rope end and tie it on the handle. He pulled it up. I was FREEZING and said I'd be right up to help, but he said he could just loop the rope through the handle and whip it back onto the ledge where it was originally, then just let go of one side of the rope and pull it back. Sounded good to my frozen brain and I crossed 3 times again and took the easier way back to the trail about 250' away. I will just say that the ammo can made the exact same noise bouncing 150' down the canyon into the middle of the small river. Also, the maniacal laughter sounded exactly the same. I gotta find new caching partners. The handle broke off, so we made it into a TB for the CO and bought him a new ammo can. Luckily he got a kick out of it.

 

You have GOT to submit that to Today's Cacher magazine!! :lol:

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With only 220something finds, I haven't tried any caches adventurous enough to allow me to throw an ammo can 150' down a canyon. I have however crawled on my belly looking for a cache without paying any attention to the poison ivy. Now, I'm no stranger to the stuff but this batch required steroids from the MD and a week or more to get over.

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We still have to remind ourselves to check the difficulty rating! We were looking for a cache in a park that has many deep ravines leading down to a river. Our GPS led us from the parking lot at the top of the park, down the trails toward the water; but when we got to the nearest location to the cache, we were looking up at an almost sheer cliff. We actually stood there debating should we climb up? But what if we get stuck halfway up, or we fall down into the river (on the beach littered with sizable rocks)? Finally I thought to look again at my printout of the cache, and noticed it was only a one and a half difficulty rating. Wait a minute, that sounds like it might be way up at the top of the park, where we started from! And the cache was there, on a spur of flat ground that extended out over where we had stood far below and half an hour's hike away!

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Very early in my caching life, while out camping with a bunch of friends I convinced the others to go geocaching with me, so off we went from camp, cross country following the arrow.

 

Up hill and across gully nothing would stop us! There were 6 or 7 of us plus a couple of dogs. Then just as I was about to step on it the largest rattle snake I've seen I looked and side stepped. Close but no cigar. The snake didn't even break stride just kept on going. :blink:

 

After a long hike we foung the cache, traded items and noticed the road and parking lot 50 feet from the cache. It was then that I learned what maps are for! :D

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I went after a 5/5 while totally unequipped. The arrow pointed out over the edge of a cliff so I went along the edge for a while until there was break in the edge with a scree slope below and there I started to descend. I then worked my way along with a sheer vertical clff above and the steep scree slope below, evey so often I dislodged a stone which would set off down the slope bouncing as it went until eventually reaching the bottom it would impact with a loud crash onto the trunk of a fallen pine tree which lay menacingly with it's snapped off limbs pointing in all directions.

 

The slope grew steeper and by now the only way to proceed was to use rocks which were sticking out of the dirt as hand and foot holds. At first there was a regular series of them but eventually there were no more and so I found myself stuck with one handhold and one foothold and it was then that the rain started and the dirt began to soften. Gradually my foothold worked loose and started it's downward journey to meet the tree, quickly I redistributed my weight but was now supported by only one hand on a stone approximately at waist height. I could'nt go forward and there was now a big gap backward. Then I felt the stone under my hand start to loosen and realised if I didn't do something I would be impaled on the tree any minute.

 

I pushed against the stone and threw myself backwards, stretching above my head with both hands to grab a stone sticking out of the dirt, if I missed or it didn't hold I was going down the slope but fortunately neither of those things happened and I was able to slowly make my way back to safer ground. Had to DNF that one :mad:

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I went after a 5/5 while totally unequipped. The arrow pointed out over the edge of a cliff so I went along the edge for a while until there was break in the edge with a scree slope below and there I started to descend. I then worked my way along with a sheer vertical clff above and the steep scree slope below, evey so often I dislodged a stone which would set off down the slope bouncing as it went until eventually reaching the bottom it would impact with a loud crash onto the trunk of a fallen pine tree which lay menacingly with it's snapped off limbs pointing in all directions.

 

The slope grew steeper and by now the only way to proceed was to use rocks which were sticking out of the dirt as hand and foot holds. At first there was a regular series of them but eventually there were no more and so I found myself stuck with one handhold and one foothold and it was then that the rain started and the dirt began to soften. Gradually my foothold worked loose and started it's downward journey to meet the tree, quickly I redistributed my weight but was now supported by only one hand on a stone approximately at waist height. I could'nt go forward and there was now a big gap backward. Then I felt the stone under my hand start to loosen and realised if I didn't do something I would be impaled on the tree any minute.

 

I pushed against the stone and threw myself backwards, stretching above my head with both hands to grab a stone sticking out of the dirt, if I missed or it didn't hold I was going down the slope but fortunately neither of those things happened and I was able to slowly make my way back to safer ground. Had to DNF that one :mad:

 

There really ought to be some kind of 'in between' sign besides DNF and a smiley...something that says, "No, I didn't find the cache...but I did risk life and limb in the name of geocaching"...like the Brawny guy...or maybe a mosquito since that outing really sucked *grin*

Edited by Mick-n-Nick
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When we first started GeoCaching, we had no idea where they would really be (never read the rules-so we carried a small shovel with us) and decided the best way to test out our GPS was to take it on a solid outdoor hike. We left for our full day of caching with 2 granola bars, 1 bottle of water and a half flask of Jim Beam.

We headed into the Deschutes River valley to pick up several caches and after several quick finds, we headed for a longer hike of about three miles before we got to the cache. Without any real idea of where it was located (other than "that way") we headed up a small trail that lead up the mountain, initially big enough for both of us, but eventually only becoming practical for one traveler at a time-single file. The compass kept on pointing backwards and to our extreme left, so I was convinced that it was further up the hill that we were on. I convinced my girlfriend I was right, and with no discernable path to follow, we trekked up a mountainside to what seemed like the top (it wasn't the top; we just couldn't see the top from where we stood). As we ascended, 40-50MPH winds were starting to accost us (or dare us to move on, I can't recall which). Still with the compass pointing due east, we moved further up the pathless hill/mountainside convinced that we were getting closer (we kinda were).

As we got to the midpoint of the mountain/hill, i looked at the GPS and saw it pointing about a mile off...on a trail that we had left two hours earlier.

We started to descend, slipping on ground that hadn't been traversed in who knows how long, and trying to stay upright by wind that wanted to knock us down. We zigged and zagged and fell and finally came to decent place to hit the trail we need to be on, only to be confronted by a 20' of basalt that we had to climb around before trying to figure out how to hop the barbwire fence that we shouldn't have crossed to begin with.

Down past the rocks, with the wind slightly less vicious and the barb wire crossed we arrived at the cache-which was down the path that we had left (convinced it shouldn't have been since the GPS pointed 'that way'). A beautiful sight, but we learned 2 valuable lessons:

1) Stay on the path (there is almost always a path)

2) Pack water.

Edited by GeoReapers
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  • Dropped a magnetic keybox down a sewer drain, but with a few hours work, managed to recover it.
  • Worked my way to a hard terrain cache, only to realize I forgot my pen, went back to get it... came back, only to realize I actually had my first pen with me all along. I left, realizing I actually left the second pen at the cache, went back to get it... Three trips. Doh!
  • Ruined one of my favorite t-shirts at a night cache by getting covered in thousands of those tiny little burrs sometimes called "hobo's lice" that are common in Iowa.
  • Dropped my car into a few feet of snow at a cache.
  • Walked off with the cache container in my pocket once, didn't realize it til the next day.
  • I have left nice gloves at at least 3 caches now.
  • Left my GPS at a cache and didn't realize it for about an hour.

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  • Dropped a magnetic keybox down a sewer drain, but with a few hours work, managed to recover it.
  • Worked my way to a hard terrain cache, only to realize I forgot my pen, went back to get it... came back, only to realize I actually had my first pen with me all along. I left, realizing I actually left the second pen at the cache, went back to get it... Three trips. Doh!
  • Ruined one of my favorite t-shirts at a night cache by getting covered in thousands of those tiny little burrs sometimes called "hobo's lice" that are common in Iowa.
  • Dropped my car into a few feet of snow at a cache.
  • Walked off with the cache container in my pocket once, didn't realize it til the next day.
  • I have left nice gloves at at least 3 caches now.
  • Left my GPS at a cache and didn't realize it for about an hour.

 

If I truly cared about someones key box, I'd just drive to the nearest hardware store and buy a new one. Either that or offer to replace it later for the owner. I have a lot of free time, but I don't want to use it fishing in a storm drain for hours.

 

I also ruined one of my favorite, and irreplaceable, T-Shirts at a CITO event. We were sanding a picnic bench with power tools and water. I got a whole bunch of the slurry on my shirt. It will never come out. It was worth it though, we made the animals at the shelter a lot more comfortable.

 

I have only once gone more than a hundred feet before realizing that something is missing. I found a cache, then hopped on the freeway and drove at 70mph for five miles, almost to my exit before realizing that my 60CS was not where it was supposed to be. I took my normal exit and pulled to the side. Hopped out and it was sitting in the windshield gap, the little locking nub that holds into a belt clip, or cradle, was hooked on the edge of my hood.

 

All in all, I think my biggest bonehead was when I spent an entire night planning an 11 mile hike with about 30 caches. I traced the trails on Google Earth, converted them to GPX, loaded them on my 60CS. Woke up at 6AM, drove 50 miles to the trail head and then realized that I forgot to load the points into my GPSr and my Palm. But I was determined. I drove back home, got my data, and drove back to the trail head to take a somewhat shorter hike.

 

My biggest misadventure was when I driving down Pacific Coast Highway, (PCH), west of Malibu when I see a portable message sign that reads "Special Event, Expect Delays." Well, how bad could it be? It turned out to be a road bicycle race that went up the highway, made a U-Turn across the highway and headed back. CHP was guarding the crossover. I ended up being the third car back when the officer stopped traffic. I estimate that 5,000 bikes crossed as the main bulk of the riders came through. There were 7.5K in the race. I sat there for over three hours. I saw no point in turning around because that was were all the bikes were heading. Finally, the herd thinned out and the officer waved us through, one at a time. The day was ruined so I drove 100 miles and didn't find a single cache.

 

[edit] Proofread three times and still mess up on the spelling.

Edited by Don_J
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I have two such moments.

 

The first was in Wyoming when I was a fresh newbie to caching. We were doing some caches on the outskirts of Cheyenne and got to a small "Preserve" for lack of a better word. It was basically a section of pasture land fenced off from the open range with some hills. We were driving in my wife's 1997 Toyota Camry. It had just started to snow, the really fine, grainy, powder snow. My wife paused at the entrance and said she wasn't sure about this, but I convinced her the snow was very thin and it wouldn't be a problem. The bad part was that the road was very gently declining in elevation on the whole way in, about a quarter of a mile. We got to a small stream crossing and I saw the cache was only 150 ft away so I got out and walked over to the cache and signed in. No problem. We then very carefully did a three point turn and started to head out. That was exactly when the wheels started spinning in place. We tried using some cardboard and flotsam for grip but it was no go. The car began to move more sideways than forward, downhill towards a barbed wire fence. Out of ideas I decided to call a tow truck out of Cheyenne, but the only cell reception was on top of a hill about half a mile from the car. The snow was getting harder and it was getting COLD. Freeze your snot cold. We called 411 and finally found a tow service open on Sunday in Cheyenne but he didn't have a GPS and this place didn't have an address that I knew of so I gave the best description that I could. He told us to stand by the highway... the highway that was three quarters of a mile from our car. So we trudged through deepening snow, and as we crested a hill we came face to face with a wolf. We apparently won the staring contest because it turned and ran off. I still think it was a BIG coyote, but my wife swears it was a wolf. We wait for 30 minutes with no shelter until we see the tow truck, he lets us ride back to the car in his cab thank goodness. But he begins to ask questions about why we are here in a Camry in this weather. To save breath I tell him I go to the University and I was studying wolf migration patterns. Easier to explain than geocaching. When we get to the car he has to go around it on the narrow road to hook up to it, so he passes up hill and begins to drift down into the side of the car, eventually missing it by about a sheet of notebook paper. The rest is uneventful, and in the end he was a really nice guy and only charged us $90 for fuel. No extra weekend or hazard fees. I think he might have felt bad about almost taking out our car.

 

The second story is in Baton Rouge. I had left a night caching event / camp out early in the morning with the intent of finding some nearby hiking caches I had been wanting to get. We arrived at a Conservation Area and I had just stepped out of the car when it began to rain. I jumped back in and waited it out for about 15 minutes. It was about 80F and very very muggy as it tends to be in south Louisiana. Eventually it quit raining so I got out and walked down a nice slag gravel trail to a huge mess of blackberry vines where my GPS was pointing. I began the trek through the brambles, shedding quite a lot of blood I am sure. Need I mention all the vegetation was slick with fresh rain, and I was sweating like a stuck pig. About 100 yards of briars and I entered the woods. Every tree I touched gave me a shower. I arrived at GZ to find an old fallen tree with an enormous rootball of clay and roots. The cache was called King of the Hill so I used the roots to climb to the top. There sat an ammo can, as pretty as you like. I took some pictures, and put my GPs in one pocket and my camera in the other pocket. I lifted the ammo can up and directly underneath was a rat burrow. The resident was not happy I had removed his shelter, and I swear to you he lunged at me. I dropped the can and jerked back in reflex, leaning me backwards over the top of the rootball. Time went very very slowly then as my arms failed for anything to grab onto. but there was nothing. I proceeded to fall ten feet or more backwards off the ball landing squarely on my back. No injuries thank goodness. I brushed myself off, climbed back up signed in and replaced the can. Then began my hike out through wet trees and brambles. When I got back to the gravel pathway I patted my self down in anticipation of an Earthcache nearby. Backpack, water bottle, GPS, ca..... Where was my camera? You guessed it, it fell out of my pocket when I fell off the hill. Back through the brambles, back through trees, grab camera, back through trees, back through brambles. I still did the EC even after all of that, and the fishermen in the park stared at me as I did a soggy muddy walk of shame back to the car. My wife didn't even want to let me inside, she said I looked like fresh death. There are pictures in the logs for those caches. heh.

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Ok I have been caching for about a year so last winter was my 1st winter caching, me and my wife and 1 year old were heading out for the day and I was told no caching, but there was one cache I had been wanting to get for a while and it was just of the main road we would be traveling along. Winters in Northern Ireland are normally cold but we wouldnt get a great deal of snow but this year we had a few really heavy snow falls and one just so happend on the day I was going for this cache I had been wanting for a while. Some convincing at the start of the jouney and my wife finally renaged and said ok just 1 cache thats it and you better not take all day about it. So we arived at the lane just off the main road it is about 2 miles long to GZ, as I started up the lane I am quite a confident driver even in these condition and everything was fine then the road started to slope up and up and up until it was very steep at this point the wheels started to spin and the car was going nowhere, but wait it then started to move the only problem was it was sliding backward brakes applied no use it kept goin, oh I forgot to mention the lane was quite narrow and to add to the problems we had passed some kids sledging on the way up. Looking behind me the kids were getting closer and closer and just staring at this car heading towards them :blink:. All I could do was put my car into a hedge doing some light damage to the rear :rolleyes:

 

Not to be beaten by this cache I decided to go back a few weeks later after everything had thawed out, it would be easy this time drive straight up grab the cache and be on my way. Again I headed up the hill and as I came round a bend on the lane there was a rather large puddle. How deep could it be I said to myself and another moment of madness I decided I could make it through it. Well you guessed it, half way through the puddle the car konks out and I'm stranded, had to get out soaked to nearly my knees and push the car out of the puddle.

 

After my 2 attempts at this cache I think I am going to leave finding my nemesis until the dead of summer surley nothing could go wrong then, could it????

Edited by andymacmyc
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My most brainless act is letting my husband drive. Here is an example from the other night.

 

Me: There is a cache 345' that way. Pull over.

 

Wolf: This way?

 

Me: Yes - slow down.

 

Wolf: I'm not going that fast.

 

Me: It's 125' that way. (expecting him to stop.) You're going to go past it.

 

Him: Where is it.

 

Me: We were within 45 feet of it but you drove so fast I couldn't tell which side.

 

Him: It's behind us? (as he drives down the a small road another 100 yards)

 

Me: (Checking the clue because it's clear he's still being a bonehead after the 5 other caches he's driven past today with me saying there's one coming up slow down and him saying "Oh I didn't hear you." or something else crazy.) It's in a tire on the ground.

 

Him: (driving back past at 20 mph) There are some tires (driving toward some leaning against a building at least 200' past GZ.

 

Me: That's not it, it's on the ground, back that way.

 

At which point he pulls out on the main road to head home.

 

Me: What are you doing? Why didn't you stop?

 

Him: Oh you wanted me to stop? You didn't tell me to stop.

 

I can't repeat what I thought at that point. But I refrained from saying anything but "Honestly did I have to tell you to stop? We were looking for a geocache, the whole point is to stop and sign the log." He wonders why I've been getting angry with him lately. Gee I wonder?

 

Edited by wolfslady
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I guess my most brainless act was deciding to cross a natural bridge.

 

To misquote Paul Harvey, here's the rest of the story:

 

I saw a cache by someone whose caches I had come to thoroughly enjoy, and decided to go for it fairly late in the evening. I was kinda familiar with the park it was in, a big honking swath of forest, bisected by a stream with 15' banks, with gobs of mountain bike trails running hither and yon. I knew that, going in from the designated parking would have taken too long, so I perused a map, finding where the aforementioned stream crossed under a roadway, parking there. I could not tell from the map in my GPS which side of the stream the cache was on, so I flipped a mental coin and (naturally), picked the wrong side. As I drew near, my pointer pointed out my error. The sun was already at the horizon, and it was getting dark fast. To further my idiocy, I had no flashlight, thinking this would be a kwick little jaunt. I knew about a huge downed tree bridge that was incorporated into the bike trail, but that was too far away to appeal to my laziness. Much closer to the cache I found a trio of downed palm trees crossing the gap, that apparently had fallen together. Two were laying side by side, with the third resting slightly above those two. I made it almost halfway before the top log snapped. It only dropped a few inches before striking the two lower logs, but this was just enough to cause my feet to slip, one off of each side of the top log. I broke my fall with my groin on the top log, which, had that been all that happened, would have been sufficient for me to suspect Gaia had a sense of humor. Unfortunately, that was not all. My bulk landing on the top log caused the bottom two logs to snap in half. At that point, six palm tree halves and one old fat guy fell the 15' to the river below. It took me some doing, but I eventually extracted my battered remains from under, over and around the palm tree sections, then verified that somehow, nothing was broken. I limped over to the near vertical river bank, somehow drug my way upward, then, once on flat ground, I used the backlight of my GPSr to find the cache. I limped my way out, went home and dosed up on Tylenol.

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It was early April, and I needed to get out caching, so I took the day off work just to get out in the sun and cache. I had a DNF on this one in the fall, and just wanted to clear it off my list. I gingerly climbed down the rather steep slope towards the lake. I looked for a few minutes around the old crab apple tree, but didn't see anything, so I decided to move down a little farther and look back up the hill to the back side of the tree. Well I learned something that fine morning. I learned that early morning dew, poison ivy, and tennis shoes just don't mix. Quick as a flash I was face first ear deep in poison ivy. I got up only to have to rummage around in the stuff to find my walking stick. I found it, along with my car keys, stood up and just smiled. There was this old lady looking down the hill with a quizzical look on her face, and no kidding, she said to me, "Sonny I'm not positive, but I think thats poison ivy your swimming around in." Quick as a flash I told her, "Yep, I hadn't gotten any yet this year." As her and her husband walked away I found the cache, got the smiley, and after all that I never got one itch.

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It took me some doing, but I eventually extracted my battered remains from under, over and around the palm tree sections, then verified that somehow, nothing was broken. I limped over to the near vertical river bank, somehow drug my way upward, then, once on flat ground, I used the backlight of my GPSr to find the cache. I limped my way out, went home and dosed up on Tylenol.

 

He did find it! What a trooper!

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Forgot to mark my vehicle.

C'mon. Pony up. We need the rest of the story.

 

It wasn't all that interesting. I followed the trail that I *thought* I'd come in on to a dirt road that didn't look very familiar. After looking at the map on my GPS a bit I was to determine that I could head

back down the trail, then do a little bushwacking to get me back to my vehicle. I was only "lost" for about

10 minutes or so.

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Probably the dumbest move I've made was failing to read the cache listing which included the following:

 

"Though the road looks drivable, don't. There are no turnarounds and the road is narrow."

 

Here's what the road looks like near the recommended parking coordinates (about 1/2 a mile from GZ) . A bit further down are several road wide puddles and deep muddy ruts.

 

dbfd87b7-650f-4ab2-adbc-3f0a19632a4b.jpg

 

And here is what it looks like very close to the cache.

 

6118a2f9-95ed-441e-b585-73f137c81410.jpg

 

I stopped my car about 50' from that spot. About 100 feet further down is an impassable hand made bridge. After searching for a half hour with no success (for a film can...which was also mentioned on the cache page) I got back in my 4WD vehicle and made about a 17 point turn to head back out.

 

I came back later in the summer, parked in the recommended spot, then rode my mountain bike in to find the cache. Even though it was a film can, I still enjoyed the location.

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Going home to get a retrieval tool for an underwater cache we had finally spied, and finding out that there was one hidden under the nearby seat which was mentioned in the description. Thankfully we live only 15 mins away...

and placing a cache without a log sheet :(

Edited by popokiiti
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My most brainless act is letting my husband drive. Here is an example from the other night.

 

Me: There is a cache 345' that way. Pull over.

 

Wolf: This way?

 

Me: Yes - slow down.

 

Wolf: I'm not going that fast.

 

Me: It's 125' that way. (expecting him to stop.) You're going to go past it.

 

Him: Where is it.

 

Me: We were within 45 feet of it but you drove so fast I couldn't tell which side.

 

Him: It's behind us? (as he drives down the a small road another 100 yards)

 

Me: (Checking the clue because it's clear he's still being a bonehead after the 5 other caches he's driven past today with me saying there's one coming up slow down and him saying "Oh I didn't hear you." or something else crazy.) It's in a tire on the ground.

 

Him: (driving back past at 20 mph) There are some tires (driving toward some leaning against a building at least 200' past GZ.

 

Me: That's not it, it's on the ground, back that way.

 

At which point he pulls out on the main road to head home.

 

Me: What are you doing? Why didn't you stop?

 

Him: Oh you wanted me to stop? You didn't tell me to stop.

 

I can't repeat what I thought at that point. But I refrained from saying anything but "Honestly did I have to tell you to stop? We were looking for a geocache, the whole point is to stop and sign the log." He wonders why I've been getting angry with him lately. Gee I wonder?

 

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My most brainless act is letting my husband drive. Here is an example from the other night.

 

Me: There is a cache 345' that way. Pull over.

 

Wolf: This way?

 

Me: Yes - slow down.

 

Wolf: I'm not going that fast.

 

Me: It's 125' that way. (expecting him to stop.) You're going to go past it.

 

Him: Where is it.

 

Me: We were within 45 feet of it but you drove so fast I couldn't tell which side.

 

Him: It's behind us? (as he drives down the a small road another 100 yards)

 

Me: (Checking the clue because it's clear he's still being a bonehead after the 5 other caches he's driven past today with me saying there's one coming up slow down and him saying "Oh I didn't hear you." or something else crazy.) It's in a tire on the ground.

 

Him: (driving back past at 20 mph) There are some tires (driving toward some leaning against a building at least 200' past GZ.

 

Me: That's not it, it's on the ground, back that way.

 

At which point he pulls out on the main road to head home.

 

Me: What are you doing? Why didn't you stop?

 

Him: Oh you wanted me to stop? You didn't tell me to stop.

 

I can't repeat what I thought at that point. But I refrained from saying anything but "Honestly did I have to tell you to stop? We were looking for a geocache, the whole point is to stop and sign the log." He wonders why I've been getting angry with him lately. Gee I wonder?

 

 

I read this post to MY husband and then asked, "SO...who's your other wife?" :laughing:

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My most brainless act just happened this past week. I was caching along a hike bike trail which runs along side of a river and came to a boardwalk at the rivers edge. I had looked at the hint which read "citengam". I started searching the boardwalk for some sort of design, trying to think of what a citengam would look like! After about five minutes the lightbulb finnaly came on!

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