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Logging Etiquette


Ecylram
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I've been tasked with writing an article on "Logging Etiguette for New Cachers" for our local geocaching chapter. This will article will be just one part of a series geared toward the new cacher.

 

My first thought was that this would be a quick article to write but I soon found myself creating an outline that would put the Encyclopedia Britannica to shame. (If you don't know what the Encyclopedia Britannica is, ask your parents. It's was used before there was an internet). Lets face it, anything that detailed isn't going to be read by too many people.

 

So, I'm throwing this out to the experts on this forum...

 

What would you want the new cacher to know about proper logging etiquette?

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To sign the paper log first and then write whatever their hearts desire on the online log. Be it two words, no words or many words. But I know I'm unique in that point of view.

I'm no expert, but I like Chokecherry's assessment. But if I have something to say that gives away the hide ("I sure didn't expect it was that fake rock next to the oak tree!"), I write that in the paper log. Then say something polite in the online log, something useful to the next cachers and to the CO.

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I'd want them to know that cache owners appreciate more than "Found it" or "TFTC". There are people who reserve these brief logs for caches that they found to be substandard. Some cache owners, knowing this, perceive them as an insult.

 

As Chokecherry said, they should write what is in their hearts. If "found it" or "TFTC" is all the cache generated in their hearts, then go with it, but if they enjoyed the cache they should convey that in their log somehow.

 

And I don't think many cache owners like these "Logged from my Blackberry" type logs. It tells the cache owner very little. If that is all their device is capable of, then they should consider editing the log and expanding on it when they get home.

 

Other etiquette points:

 

No spoilers in the text or attached photos

 

Make sure you have the right cache (I've received logs that made absolutely no sense and it turned out the logger keyed in a wrong GC#).

 

Don't use logs as a forum. Take the debates to PM or here.

 

Use the appropriate log type. If you found the cache then it's a "found it". If you didn't find it, it's a DNF. Doing otherwise can confuse the owner and other cachers.

 

Log your DNFs. They are nothing to be ashamed of and provide the CO and other cachers with important information.

Edited by briansnat
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Log book gets signature and date, and if temperature permits, I will sometimes draw a little doodle or picture.

 

On line, if the container is unique I will say so, if the placement is fine I will say so, if the view is nice I will say so. Try and find something nice to say for the people who make the hides. It is a lot harder to hide than find and without hiders there are no finders, something that some finders fail to grasp. Ettiquette--try and be nice.

 

And make sure you send a personal thanks to the people who plan and execute Event Caches--which sometimes are very involved. Sometimes an event turns out to be a spectacular day thanks to the sponso.

 

I perceive (not saying I am right-for I am often not) a trend of folks with thousands of finds and hides countable on fingers and toes. That in some discussion with some friends discourages them from "feeding the beast" is how one put it.

Edited by Packanack
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From a cache in N. W. Calif GC2MJVW:

 

Dear Cache, as we drove up the canyon following the arrow on the Tupperware finding auto-azimuth-degronafacation-gizmo-thing-A-ma-jig the fog dissipated and deep blue azure sky's appeared overhead, Upon disembarkation from the big red cache finding mobile unit the birds were erupting into song and the scent of the warming trees was wondrous indeed. As we stood taking in the joyous wonders of this beautiful canyon your snickering and taunts from your hiding spot broke the trance and as much as we would have loved to linger awhile longer you were calling us back to the job at hand. As I started my search your twittering soon made me realize I was in the wrong spot and it made me think back to the time oh so many years ago as I walked through the verdant plains of California's northern valley I had heard just such a twitter from a cache such as you and once I had cleared my mind of thoughts of wandering this way or that and trusted your mellifluous call to your hiding spot you were quickly in hand. So after reflecting on past lessons I cleared my mind and followed your voice that was as clear as the icy waters running in the creek below you. After what we though was a search the TSA would be proud of you could still be heard chiding us as we must have just missed you by a fraction of an inch so on the next pass we were a little more meticulous and your location was discovered and the formal signing of the log was undertaken with all the Pomp and fanfare (sheese Louise I don't know if I'm gonna make a 1000 words I'm an rookie at this and I'm thinking it's best left to the professionals like H.F.) deserving of such a fine cache. When you were finally nestled back into your hidey hole we bid you adieu but before our journey continues we would like to take this opportunity to thank your owner for placing you here in these beautiful mountains so that seekers like us will come and revel in the peace and solitude of this place that is unlike too many other place's on this planet in fact I can only remember one such place I visited many years ago that stirred my soul such as you and that memory flickers brightly through the veils of time. TN LN SL

(whew!)

 

Certainly humbled me

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Write as if a human found it, not a robot. So "after dodging the sheep this was an easy find, thanks" rather than TFTC or, worse, SFMMD.

 

Attach photos from time to time. They are appreciated.

 

I'm a bit afraid to ask this question, but...what does 'SFMMD' stand for?

 

That would be the new trend of "Sent from my mobile device" log. Apparently not appreciated by CO's. (I don't blame them either)

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What is required? Nothing. Physical geocaches can be logged online as "Found" once the physical log has been signed. (Yes, I'm quoting the dreaded ALR guideline. Requiring anything in the online log would be an ALR, so this statement applies when explaining what is required in an online log.) In fact online logging itself is not required. You went out, you found the cache (or not), you had fun, you don't have to do anything else.

 

What is appreciated? The online log is meant to share your experience and as a place to thank the cache owner for the cache. Share your experience, let others know if there are issues that need to be addressed (log book full, travel bug is missing, etc.), and thank the cache owner.

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What is required? Nothing. Physical geocaches can be logged online as "Found" once the physical log has been signed. (Yes, I'm quoting the dreaded ALR guideline. Requiring anything in the online log would be an ALR, so this statement applies when explaining what is required in an online log.) In fact online logging itself is not required. You went out, you found the cache (or not), you had fun, you don't have to do anything else.

 

What is appreciated? The online log is meant to share your experience and as a place to thank the cache owner for the cache. Share your experience, let others know if there are issues that need to be addressed (log book full, travel bug is missing, etc.), and thank the cache owner.

 

Here is one of the problems. Toz is quite right about nothing being required. But there is a difference between requirements and etiquette. The usually accepted etiquette around here is find cache, sign log book, log online with appropriate comments.

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We're actually in the process of rewriting some old logs. When we started, we didn't exactly know the do's and dont's of log writing. As we've made more finds, we find ourselves looking more from a CO's point of view. Would I, having taken the time to find a hiding place, make my cache, fill it with goodies, and post it online, be happy with someone only bothering with a 4 letter response?

 

The thing that really changed our perspective was a cache over in our neck of the woods:

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?guid=f6076bd5-ecdc-4482-955d-f986d58474b7&log=y

Might not be a bad idea to look at instituting a "Log Improvement Boot Camp" of your own...

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State that you found the cache, other than that it's up to the finder. I don't bother the read the "Found" notifications and I would guess that others cache owners don't as well so suggest that any information about needing maintenance should be done with a "needs maintenance", log entry not in the body of the "Found". (My hides are under the user profile I Love Interlopers).

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You may also want to add some etiquette about TB's and Geocoins. Let them know that they aren't meant to be kept and that they have specific missions. Also let them know the difference between finding, grabbing, discovering, etc. so as not to mess up their mileage.

 

One other thing, if they take a photo of the TB or coin to remove it's number so others can't make a false find or grab and to never put their number id in their log.

 

These are just a couple things I thought of.

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I try to always write something uniqe for each cache I find. As a cache owner the things I appreciate most in any log is among the following:

  • Condition of the cache
  • contents of the cache
  • what was traded in/out
  • tell me where you are from
  • The condition of the hide area
  • funny story about the journey to the cache
  • why did you choose this cache
  • who was with you
  • what equipment did you use
  • what was special/different about the hide to you
  • Did you see any animals/birds nearby?
  • Was it easy/hard for you

 

If nothing else at all -just mention the weather while you were at the cache site.

 

Log your DNFs and be proud of those stories.

 

Upload any pictures you took.

 

Avoid spoilers and/or overt hints to the cache.

 

Share with the other cachers that look at the page.

 

Avoid using any kind of "shortcut" languages. (TFTC etc)

 

Be honest but not cruel.

 

If you have time - write a sentence or 2 in the physical logbook including your hometown/state/country.

 

Take a moment to enjoy other's logs.

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I see the online log as 3 things. First, it's a note to the CO, so I want to tell them anything important about the cache. Does it need maintenance? Is it hidden well? I also like to express my appreciation for the cache. Second, it's a note to future finders. Is there something unexpected that might help future finders? Maybe mention if the cache is particularly good (or bad) for cachers with kids, or if I found the ratings to be inaccurate. And finally, it's a note to myself. I want to be able to go back and read and remember what kind of adventure we had. Did we see wildlife? How was the weather? Just a couple of sentences can convey all this.

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To sign the paper log first and then write whatever their hearts desire on the online log. Be it two words, no words or many words. But I know I'm unique in that point of view.

 

...and there are folks like me who don't care what you put in your log on my caches. I hid it so you would find it. I really don't care how you relay to me that you found it. The mission was accomplished.

 

On the other hand, I tend to write long logs, because I enjoy writing them, not because I feel I must.

 

Since the question has alredy been answered (what BrianSnat said :lol:) I'll quote these two posts abouve. CokeCherry: Joined April, 2010. Terraviators: Joined April 2010. (Hey did you guys know you joined 5 days apart?). Now I'm not saying there aren't people around like SBell111: Joined 2002, who are pro-anything is a log. But it does seem to be mostly newer people. These lame logs (my opinion) just started showing up within the last 2 years by the tens of thousands. You guys can at least see where us grumpy people are coming from, can't you? Joe Blow with 50 finds who joined 2 months ago just wasn't logging "TFTC" for every cache in 2006. I would hope most people could see how the grumpy 2003 joiner could interpret this trend as a dumbing down of Geocaching.

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To sign the paper log first and then write whatever their hearts desire on the online log. Be it two words, no words or many words. But I know I'm unique in that point of view.

 

...and there are folks like me who don't care what you put in your log on my caches. I hid it so you would find it. I really don't care how you relay to me that you found it. The mission was accomplished.

 

On the other hand, I tend to write long logs, because I enjoy writing them, not because I feel I must.

 

Since the question has already been answered (what BrianSnat said :lol:) I'll quote these two posts above. ChokeCherry: Joined April, 2010. Terraviators: Joined April 2010. (Hey did you guys know you joined 5 years apart?). Now I'm not saying there aren't people around like SBell111: Joined 2002, who are pro-anything is a log. But it does seem to be mostly newer people. These lame logs (my opinion) just started showing up within the last 2 years by the tens of thousands. You guys can at least see where us grumpy people are coming from, can't you? Joe Blow with 50 finds who joined 2 months ago just wasn't logging "TFTC" for every cache in 2006. I would hope most people could see how the grumpy 2003 joiner could interpret this trend as a dumbing down of Geocaching.

 

I agree with Yuck. Acronym-only logs, 'Logged from my blackberry' or blank logs dumb-down Geocaching, making it more about numbers then about community.

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I'd make a bullet point summary at the top of the article - brief and to the point. Then go ahead and expand below. That way you've gotten your info across fast via the bullet points to people who don't want to be bothered to read the whole thing (if part of your intended audience is the "TFTC" crowd, then I think short and succinct is a plus). And yet you've still got more info down below for people who do want to know more.

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To sign the paper log first and then write whatever their hearts desire on the online log. Be it two words, no words or many words. But I know I'm unique in that point of view.

 

...and there are folks like me who don't care what you put in your log on my caches. I hid it so you would find it. I really don't care how you relay to me that you found it. The mission was accomplished.

 

On the other hand, I tend to write long logs, because I enjoy writing them, not because I feel I must.

 

Since the question has alredy been answered (what BrianSnat said :lol:) I'll quote these two posts abouve. CokeCherry: Joined April, 2010. Terraviators: Joined April 2010. (Hey did you guys know you joined 5 days apart?). Now I'm not saying there aren't people around like SBell111: Joined 2002, who are pro-anything is a log. But it does seem to be mostly newer people. These lame logs (my opinion) just started showing up within the last 2 years by the tens of thousands. You guys can at least see where us grumpy people are coming from, can't you? Joe Blow with 50 finds who joined 2 months ago just wasn't logging "TFTC" for every cache in 2006. I would hope most people could see how the grumpy 2003 joiner could interpret this trend as a dumbing down of Geocaching.

 

Not everyone joins this because of the community aspect. If you looked at my logs you would notice they are longer logs. I'm just saying I don't disagree with people who don't log a lot. And for me for some of the caches if the owner was really in knot about me logging my experience I would likely passive aggressively go back and log much much more about what was actually going on in my world while looking for the cache. My cacheing experience are more about me leaving home and processing my thoughts about work and whatever than it is about looking for the caches. I do that just to give me something to physically do while my mind whirring through graphic abuse cases and whatever. So really what I see going to the cache, the weather, how the container is doing (unless it's really a mess) and whatever really flies right by me much of the time unless there is something magnificent to look at. Sometimes I'll post my pictures to my logs as well. I don't do it to stroke the egos of the cache owners, I don't even do that for other finders most of the time. I log for me and me alone. And for my benefit when I go back and read them so I can remember.

 

Not every single person caches in the same way or for the same reasons. And maybe, just maybe, people need to step back and look at that instead of looking at how they've been slighted.

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If I was writing something about log etiquette, I would mention that some people tend to feel slighted by these shorter logs, but I would stop short of saying that the logs are objectively insulting. They aren't. Cache owners should accept some responsibility for the way they react to actions that are, in actuality, neutral with no ill intent.

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I try to always write something uniqe for each cache I find. As a cache owner the things I appreciate most in any log is among the following:

  • Condition of the cache
  • contents of the cache
  • what was traded in/out
  • tell me where you are from
  • The condition of the hide area
  • funny story about the journey to the cache
  • why did you choose this cache
  • who was with you
  • what equipment did you use
  • what was special/different about the hide to you
  • Did you see any animals/birds nearby?
  • Was it easy/hard for you

 

If nothing else at all -just mention the weather while you were at the cache site.

 

Log your DNFs and be proud of those stories.

 

Upload any pictures you took.

 

Avoid spoilers and/or overt hints to the cache.

 

Share with the other cachers that look at the page.

 

Avoid using any kind of "shortcut" languages. (TFTC etc)

 

Be honest but not cruel.

 

If you have time - write a sentence or 2 in the physical logbook including your hometown/state/country.

 

Take a moment to enjoy other's logs.

 

Thank you so much for this. I was asking for something like this in another thread and sort of got told that it wasn't practical to give a bullet point list, as people would just bullet point their answers, I wouldn't do that but was unsure what I was supposed to say other than the obvious TFTC.

 

If you don't mind I'd like to print this out to keep in my caching bag, so I have it for reference. Hope this will be ok?

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To sign the paper log first and then write whatever their hearts desire on the online log. Be it two words, no words or many words. But I know I'm unique in that point of view.

 

...and there are folks like me who don't care what you put in your log on my caches. I hid it so you would find it. I really don't care how you relay to me that you found it. The mission was accomplished.

 

On the other hand, I tend to write long logs, because I enjoy writing them, not because I feel I must.

 

Since the question has alredy been answered (what BrianSnat said :lol:) I'll quote these two posts abouve. CokeCherry: Joined April, 2010. Terraviators: Joined April 2010. (Hey did you guys know you joined 5 days apart?). Now I'm not saying there aren't people around like SBell111: Joined 2002, who are pro-anything is a log. But it does seem to be mostly newer people. These lame logs (my opinion) just started showing up within the last 2 years by the tens of thousands. You guys can at least see where us grumpy people are coming from, can't you? Joe Blow with 50 finds who joined 2 months ago just wasn't logging "TFTC" for every cache in 2006. I would hope most people could see how the grumpy 2003 joiner could interpret this trend as a dumbing down of Geocaching.

 

Not everyone joins this because of the community aspect. If you looked at my logs you would notice they are longer logs. I'm just saying I don't disagree with people who don't log a lot. And for me for some of the caches if the owner was really in knot about me logging my experience I would likely passive aggressively go back and log much much more about what was actually going on in my world while looking for the cache. My cacheing experience are more about me leaving home and processing my thoughts about work and whatever than it is about looking for the caches. I do that just to give me something to physically do while my mind whirring through graphic abuse cases and whatever. So really what I see going to the cache, the weather, how the container is doing (unless it's really a mess) and whatever really flies right by me much of the time unless there is something magnificent to look at. Sometimes I'll post my pictures to my logs as well. I don't do it to stroke the egos of the cache owners, I don't even do that for other finders most of the time. I log for me and me alone. And for my benefit when I go back and read them so I can remember.

 

Not every single person caches in the same way or for the same reasons. And maybe, just maybe, people need to step back and look at that instead of looking at how they've been slighted.

 

Good post, thanks for your thoughts. But why do you, and many others discussing this topic, assume I (or we with similar opinions) have been "slighted"? I myself have received maybe 10 "TFTC" logs on all my caches that probably don't deserve such a log. I'm talking about THOUSANDS of these logs I've seen, all within the last two years, and the general dumbing down of Geocaching that I interpret this as.

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I try to always write something uniqe for each cache I find. As a cache owner the things I appreciate most in any log is among the following:

  • Condition of the cache
  • contents of the cache
  • what was traded in/out
  • tell me where you are from
  • The condition of the hide area
  • funny story about the journey to the cache
  • why did you choose this cache
  • who was with you
  • what equipment did you use
  • what was special/different about the hide to you
  • Did you see any animals/birds nearby?
  • Was it easy/hard for you

 

If nothing else at all -just mention the weather while you were at the cache site.

 

Log your DNFs and be proud of those stories.

 

Upload any pictures you took.

 

Avoid spoilers and/or overt hints to the cache.

 

Share with the other cachers that look at the page.

 

Avoid using any kind of "shortcut" languages. (TFTC etc)

 

Be honest but not cruel.

 

If you have time - write a sentence or 2 in the physical logbook including your hometown/state/country.

 

Take a moment to enjoy other's logs.

 

Thank you so much for this. I was asking for something like this in another thread and sort of got told that it wasn't practical to give a bullet point list, as people would just bullet point their answers, I wouldn't do that but was unsure what I was supposed to say other than the obvious TFTC.

 

If you don't mind I'd like to print this out to keep in my caching bag, so I have it for reference. Hope this will be ok?

Sure - go ahead.

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Try and write a log that you would like to read if this were your cache. Try not to cause offense, but be honest. Hopefully you can make note of positives about a cache, even if there are some negatives.

I usually just sign the logbook with our names and get a bit more prolific with words in the online log.

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Not everyone joins this because of the community aspect. If you looked at my logs you would notice they are longer logs. I'm just saying I don't disagree with people who don't log a lot. And for me for some of the caches if the owner was really in knot about me logging my experience I would likely passive aggressively go back and log much much more about what was actually going on in my world while looking for the cache. My cacheing experience are more about me leaving home and processing my thoughts about work and whatever than it is about looking for the caches. I do that just to give me something to physically do while my mind whirring through graphic abuse cases and whatever. So really what I see going to the cache, the weather, how the container is doing (unless it's really a mess) and whatever really flies right by me much of the time unless there is something magnificent to look at. Sometimes I'll post my pictures to my logs as well. I don't do it to stroke the egos of the cache owners, I don't even do that for other finders most of the time. I log for me and me alone. And for my benefit when I go back and read them so I can remember.

 

Not every single person caches in the same way or for the same reasons. And maybe, just maybe, people need to step back and look at that instead of looking at how they've been slighted.

 

Good post, thanks for your thoughts. But why do you, and many others discussing this topic, assume I (or we with similar opinions) have been "slighted"? I myself have received maybe 10 "TFTC" logs on all my caches that probably don't deserve such a log. I'm talking about THOUSANDS of these logs I've seen, all within the last two years, and the general dumbing down of Geocaching that I interpret this as.

 

Exactly.

 

It's not about feeling slighted, it's more about the trend towards the lowest-common-denominator, the fastest and easiest way to get a smiley. If the trend continues then COs that don't care what you think about their caches might be the majority of people who hide caches.

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What is required? Nothing. Physical geocaches can be logged online as "Found" once the physical log has been signed. (Yes, I'm quoting the dreaded ALR guideline. Requiring anything in the online log would be an ALR, so this statement applies when explaining what is required in an online log.) In fact online logging itself is not required. You went out, you found the cache (or not), you had fun, you don't have to do anything else.

 

What is appreciated? The online log is meant to share your experience and as a place to thank the cache owner for the cache. Share your experience, let others know if there are issues that need to be addressed (log book full, travel bug is missing, etc.), and thank the cache owner.

 

Here is one of the problems. Toz is quite right about nothing being required. But there is a difference between requirements and etiquette. The usually accepted etiquette around here is find cache, sign log book, log online with appropriate comments.

 

Very well put.

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State that you found the cache, other than that it's up to the finder. I don't bother the read the "Found" notifications and I would guess that others cache owners don't as well so suggest that any information about needing maintenance should be done with a "needs maintenance", log entry not in the body of the "Found". (My hides are under the user profile I Love Interlopers).

You don't bother to read the Found It logs that come in on your own caches? I read every one, and I suspect most cachers do.
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Great responses so far. The only further advice I have, and what I appreciate is when a finder posts unique logs. Something about that particular slice of their adventure. I pride myself on creating unique experiences for the finders, so it's a little underwhelming to see that they blasted the same log for all the caches they found that day. I understand that it takes extra time, but it really does make a CO feel motivated to turn it up a notch on the next hide...so in the long run it will pay off for the finders.

 

Also, a great log keeps CO's informed. If a puzzle was complicated and needed a group effort to solve, say so...this may inform how they create their next Mystery cache. If a container isn't holding up well, say so, politely so the CO doesn't use them again.

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I believe it's much simpler than all this.

 

I'd say something like this........

 

Feel free to log your attempt to find the cache. The website is for Your benefit. Use it to help you separate those caches you already found, from those you haven't.

Any sort of log is fine......from the simple TFTC, to the magnificent 2 pagers with pictures attached.

 

:rolleyes:

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State that you found the cache, other than that it's up to the finder. I don't bother the read the "Found" notifications and I would guess that others cache owners don't as well so suggest that any information about needing maintenance should be done with a "needs maintenance", log entry not in the body of the "Found". (My hides are under the user profile I Love Interlopers).

You don't bother to read the Found It logs that come in on your own caches? I read every one, and I suspect most cachers do.

I agree, I was surprised to see this statement. I figure if you don't read the logs what is the point of hiding one?

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The thing is, you can't put expectations on a large group of people and expect everyone to follow them. People cache for different reasons (as has been displayed here), and you can't fault ANYONE whether they don't sign the log at all or if they write a novel online. That's part of being a CO, I would think.

 

I think that is what will be hard about coming up with an etiquette that everyone will agree on.

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The thing is, you can't put expectations on a large group of people and expect everyone to follow them. People cache for different reasons (as has been displayed here), and you can't fault ANYONE whether they don't sign the log at all or if they write a novel online. That's part of being a CO, I would think.

 

I think that is what will be hard about coming up with an etiquette that everyone will agree on.

 

I agree that you can't expect everyone to follow them. But it sounds as though this article is aimed at newbies, so just explaining what CO's and other cachers *appreciate* in a log may convince a few to write longer logs. When we first started geocaching, I just patterned my logs after what other people wrote in the logs. It wasn't until I started reading the forums that I realized that some CO's appreciated more.

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The thing is, you can't put expectations on a large group of people and expect everyone to follow them. People cache for different reasons (as has been displayed here), and you can't fault ANYONE whether they don't sign the log at all or if they write a novel online. That's part of being a CO, I would think.

 

I think that is what will be hard about coming up with an etiquette that everyone will agree on.

 

I agree that you can't expect everyone to follow them. But it sounds as though this article is aimed at newbies, so just explaining what CO's and other cachers *appreciate* in a log may convince a few to write longer logs. When we first started geocaching, I just patterned my logs after what other people wrote in the logs. It wasn't until I started reading the forums that I realized that some CO's appreciated more.

That's perfect. I've noticed that most of geocaching is very 'monkey see, monkey do' from the way we converse, hide caches, jargon, etc.

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Thank the owner for anything about the cache that was unique: if you loved the container, if you loved the view, if you loved the puzzle, if you loved what you learned because of the plaque/puzzle/description. When something about their creation is appreciated, COs love to hear about it.

 

I have a puzzle cache where the final has an on-theme object next to the container; I love hearing finders compliment the flair.

 

I created a sneaky puzzle inspired by another cache. The COs of the cache that inspired me complimented me on my implementation.

 

I placed a cache on a trail I don't think many people know about. It pleases me to hear a finder agree that the trail was worth visiting.

 

My favorite hide so far may be the offset cache I placed near a small, obscure local cemetery. The cache is offset from a plaque related to the cemetery. Nearly every log has noted they didn't know anything about the history of the cemetery and many didn't know the cemetery even existed!

 

All those comments in the logs make me feel good as a CO.

 

My log also usually contains notes about who I was caching with that day, how many caches I found that day, and anything interesting I saw on the journey that resulted from searching for the cache. If the cache took me awhile to find, I will note that. If I DNF the cache, I will explain the circumstances of the DNF (searched approx N minutes, "area is burned", "reading the logs I'm pretty sure what I missed", etc).

Edited by joshism
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I agree with all the comments about writing more verbose logs. My concern is that new cachers may be overwhelmed by the thought of writing long, detailed messages.

 

I tell new cachers that they don't need to write War and Peace or be expected to sit down for hours at a time to write a log (unless they WANT to), but it only takes a few seconds to say something nice about a cache where the cache owner has CLEARLY spent a more substantial multiple of that time in its creation, placement, etc.

Edited by daschpeeg
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