Jump to content

Why do people suddenly stop caching?


Followers 13

Recommended Posts

from talking to people i think one of the main reasons is cache burn out.i think people try and get that many caches under there belt that they get fed up.just take it easy and do them as and when,without going mad.

 

i think thats spot on

 

Certainly its what happened with Alan (M1EYO) who was no1 UK cacher to get to 6000. He's done 200 since he was overtaken but drsolly has done 4000. Suspect he's glad to have got that monkey off his back :wub:

Link to comment

In our case we had quite a few major happenings in our everyday lives that had to take priority over caching.

Now time has passed we are just dusting off the GPSRs and getting back out there.

i remember you two. glad to have you back.look forward to seeing you both at future events

Link to comment

In my case I decided last year to beat my previous best "consecutive days", and managed to do it before finally giving in to that awful winter flu bug in November which took me weeks to get over. After a long break I started to cache again, and now making an effort to cache with a group is much more satisfying. I'm enjoying caching now, and I don't need my twice-weekly fix.

Link to comment

I had a phone call on my mobile the other day... Didn't recognise the number so answered politely (as opposed to "Watcha, mate"). It was from a cacher I hadn't heard from for a long, long time. He was doing one of my caches and needed some info..... Anyone else remember 'Masher' ? :laughing::anicute:

Link to comment

They get fed up of micros stuffed in hedges? or terribly hard and pointless puzzle caches? :(

 

Pointless micros in busy places really annoy me :D , so I no longer do them.

 

The credit crunch is another thing, what with the price of petrol.

Now, if I'm going hillwalking or visiting somewhere new I'll see if there are any caches nearby. and do them. Also, it can be a time thing, with work and kids there is little enough time left in the week as it is. :D

Link to comment

In our case we had quite a few major happenings in our everyday lives that had to take priority over caching.

Now time has passed we are just dusting off the GPSRs and getting back out there.

i remember you two. glad to have you back.look forward to seeing you both at future events

:D Thanks alma, we too hope to bump into you

Remember you well form the early days might see you on Sunday :(

 

As for leaving we have cut back / slowed down the "game" is very different these days so we have had to become more and more selective to find the type of caching that we enjoy.

Link to comment

As someone who has not found or hidden a geocache in a long long time. I can say the reasons are many but mostly family and work commitments followed by other hobbies getting in the way. I keep saying that I must go out and go geocaching but never seem to be able to make the time! Saying that though the kids announced on the last day of the school holidays that they remembered going up mountains (most likely small hills) and finding boxes with toys in them. So maybe some day soon if this bloody rain stops we may make a trip out to hide and seek some new caches. There are a few new cachers up around my area but still not a lot even after my caches having been hidden for several years. I have to hang my head in shame and admit that a few of mine are reported as sitting full of water but I just haven't had the time to get out and replace them. However I am sure if I get a few decent new caches hidden that a certain Highland Nick will be forced to come back up the A9 to have a go at finding them.

Link to comment

Having sat back and watched this thread I thought I would put a point across.

Has anybody stopped to think that just possibly some of the newer cachers who find a few and then stop have actually joined the forum and seen some of the bickering and back biting that goes on:

Oh you shouldnt hide this type, you shouldnt do this , dont like cachers that hide these, dont like cachers that do this or that, or even lets all gang up on the Moderators or Reviewers (just for fun of course :huh: ).

I sometimes think that if I wasnt so long in the tooth and have skin like a rhino I might just not carry on with this 'friendly' hobby.

 

Ok time to get in my bomb proof shelter just in case all the old ammo boxes get opened and a lot of brown stuff thrown in my direction. :blink:

Edited by DrDick&Vick
Link to comment

I stopped, but with less than 200 caches in 7 years, some say I never really started :P Anyway the reason I got fed up with it all was micro's and nano's. They may fulfill the "geo-" side of things but as for "-caching" I think not. Also have you tried caching with just a GPS with no logs, hints or internet access. I filter out everything other than trads for my GPS. I always thought anything samller than something you can get a TB in should have a different GC code. Finally I always think of caches to be in places that have some reason whether that is hostorical or just a nice place. I recently had a DNF in a Tesco car park. What the hell was a cache doing in an urban supermarket car park!

This week I've done more caches than I have in ages as it's taking me, and the family, to some lovely spots.

Link to comment

As I anticipated near the beginning of this thread I found a couple of caches in the Brecon Beacons at the weekend (I think I only deserved one of them, the owner of the Cribyn Earthcache was probably over-generous in letting me claim it as a find).

 

Now a total of 52 caches found in 7 years of searching!

 

Regards,

 

Neil

Link to comment

I love geocaching but I haven't been able to get out since the beginning of the year. It is a combination of work, starting a degree, stress, busy schedule and bloody hot weather. Now that things have calmed down I can't wait to get out once it cools down and this awful humidity we are having at the mo has gone! 94% the day before yesterday :mad:

Link to comment

I stopped, but with less than 200 caches in 7 years, some say I never really started :mad: Anyway the reason I got fed up with it all was micro's and nano's.

I couldn't agree more. I'm just coming up to my 1000th cache and to be honest, I'm finding it a real drag trying to find some "proper" caches these days. I'm visiting the Maidstone area in a few weeks time and I can't believe that nearly all the caches around that area are micro's. What's the point? Unless the current trend changes, I'm afraid that I'm going to be another cacher who reluctantly gives it all up. :mad:

Link to comment

Unlike some, we are happy to find 'micros' but before we go out I plan our day by looking on MMap and Google Earth and if I don't like the look of the area I use my special filter (MY CHOICE) and don't go for that one.

Sometime we get annoyed at finding micros in places like Dartmoor but if they take us to somewhere that I would not have gone and I find it interesting then I don't care.

Don't think we will give up whatever, at least while we can get out and remain mobile but then again it is our choice how we go about our caching and what we choose to find, the same choice that everybody else has.

Link to comment

 

A lot of the caches near to me are incredibly cryptic puzzles that just baffle the hell out of me. Surrey is absolutely plagued with these things, and there's hardly any trads or reasonably simple multis, which I find very frustrating. I'm likely to never do them, and as all the alternatives dry up, I may end up caching less often.

 

Lee

 

We're working on it!

 

I do agree that Surrey has a plethora of puzzles - but its now starting to develop a good all round mix of caches in the Reigate area - so we have a number of circular walks (not all of which are heavily micro-based!), some nice multis, our RTB series (all of which are trads) and some 5* abseiling caches for the hard-core!

 

For those that want to up the numbers, there are also Church Micros galore, and - obviously - lots of puzzles! A few of them are even solvable!

 

The only things we're missing are virtuals, earthcaches, and whereigos - and I'm working on two of those!)

 

G'wan, give us a go!

 

Dave

Link to comment

I stopped cus Iv'e been dumped by my soon to be ex and it's not much fun going caching on your own!! sob ;) But I'm sorting out a new user name and hopefully will be able to get back into it soon. Anyone out there looking for someone to cache with? Rose formerley rose and vince

 

Commiserations...

 

I've no idea whether you're rose (now "Rose without a thorn"? :D ) or vince (now "Invincible" maybe? :unsure: ) but perhaps it would be a good idea to attend a local geocaching event to get to know your local geocachers? Also, pinned at the top of this forum is a list of "Geocaching Organisations within UK and Ireland" where you might find a forum for your specific region - That would be a good place to try and find a geocaching companion.

 

MrsB

Edited by The Blorenges
Link to comment

 

A lot of the caches near to me are incredibly cryptic puzzles that just baffle the hell out of me. Surrey is absolutely plagued with these things, and there's hardly any trads or reasonably simple multis, which I find very frustrating. I'm likely to never do them, and as all the alternatives dry up, I may end up caching less often.

 

Lee

 

We're working on it!

 

I do agree that Surrey has a plethora of puzzles - but its now starting to develop a good all round mix of caches in the Reigate area - so we have a number of circular walks (not all of which are heavily micro-based!), some nice multis, our RTB series (all of which are trads) and some 5* abseiling caches for the hard-core!

 

For those that want to up the numbers, there are also Church Micros galore, and - obviously - lots of puzzles! A few of them are even solvable!

 

The only things we're missing are virtuals, earthcaches, and whereigos - and I'm working on two of those!)

 

G'wan, give us a go!

 

Dave

 

We're working on it in the Croydon area too. No abseiling but there are a good variety, micros only where necessary and very few under a pile of sticks at the base of a tree :unsure:

 

It has become difficult to find new decent sized local caches. We've got the RTB ones lined up for the very first day the children go back to school...

Link to comment

I stopped, but with less than 200 caches in 7 years, some say I never really started :unsure: Anyway the reason I got fed up with it all was micro's and nano's. They may fulfill the "geo-" side of things but as for "-caching" I think not. Also have you tried caching with just a GPS with no logs, hints or internet access. I filter out everything other than trads for my GPS. I always thought anything samller than something you can get a TB in should have a different GC code. Finally I always think of caches to be in places that have some reason whether that is hostorical or just a nice place. I recently had a DNF in a Tesco car park. What the hell was a cache doing in an urban supermarket car park!

This week I've done more caches than I have in ages as it's taking me, and the family, to some lovely spots.

 

Agree with all that's said above. There are still loads of interesting places that don't have caches both near and far, but we have an ever growing list on our nearest not founds that appear to have no real attraction e.g. supermarket car parks, lay byes etc. that we quite happily drive past. As one previous poster said there are loads of trig points out there and I think we will be focussing more on these in the future and after seven years of caching will finish up doing odd caches which are in a decent place on a decent walk. When we got our first 100 we had to travel around 100 miles to be able to do so and most if not all were intersting finds. The 100 nearest caches to home now feature all sorts and we probably have several hundred within 20 miles or so, so i think it is basically quantity now rather than quality.

Link to comment

I stopped for many months simply because with work commitments the only times I could cache were weekends, and so many consecutive weekends saw either exhaustion from the week, dismal weather, or other things to do, that caching simply got sidelined.

 

But now I've got more time on my hands and a whole stack of caches appeared near home, so I'm out and about a lot now and enjoying it greatly. Although in fairness I'm enjoying cycling and caching, so once the caches I can sensibly reach on the bike are all either solved or ignored I'll most likely focus on the cycling and less on the caching.

 

For a long time the only caches in central London I hadn't done seemed to be film pots attached to park benches. When you get to the first one only to see a muggle sit down and get a book out of their bag and move on, only to find another park bench cache covered by a muggle with a book, there's less and less inclination to go to the next park bench.

Link to comment

I know I've not long started caching, but for me the nanos and micros simply help to build experience, even if they are in a car park. I'd much rather see a hundred nanos in car parks than one that can only be logged by abseiling. Next we'll see caches 300 feet below sea level for the hard core submarine fanatics!

 

I suspect before long I'll reach a saturation point of not being able to find any more based on being a single dad to my 2½ year old son and having taking my bike off the road. I never got to ride it and the insurance, MOT etc. was simply not worth it for the odd day. If you can't get to the caches then there's little point in continuing.

 

I started this to give him some exercise and fresh air but he soon gets tired after a couple of miles of walking so caching may be put on the back burner until circumstances change.

Link to comment

....... I'd much rather see a hundred nanos in car parks than one that can only be logged by abseiling. ....

There we have it, expressed eloquently, the reason geocaching is what it is today. :P

 

What?

 

Inclusive, available for all and with the freedom to do it in your own way within your own financial, physical and leisure time limits?

Link to comment

....... I'd much rather see a hundred nanos in car parks than one that can only be logged by abseiling. ....

There we have it, expressed eloquently, the reason geocaching is what it is today. :P

 

While I must admit I would far prefer to be walking in the countryside finding ammo boxes, currently my circumstances dictate that were it not for urban micros/nanos, I would be unable to cache. With an 18 month old who's either in a pushchair or on reins and unable to manage a long walk across the countryside, I am grateful to those who have placed urban micros so that I can keep my hand in geocaching until such a time where my little boy is big enough to cope with a long walk to a countryside ammo box.

 

It's been said before, but if you don't like a cache then you can choose not to do it and even add it to your ignore list, but at least it's still there for me and my little boy to find so that we can still enjoy the game together.

Link to comment

Ultimately caching comes down to your own personal perceptions of the sport. If, like Sarah & Pete and myself you have young children then extreme sports such as abseiling is completely out of the question.

No doubt there are some that would rather see a hundred individual interest caches than one urban nano. What you have to remember is that these are great for providing experience.

 

A couple of friends and myself have contemplated combining our own hobbies and interests with geocaching but we've put those ideas on the back burner.

  • Motorbiking - having a multi set around popular biking routes, finding clues in biker bars and even giving clues that only a biker could answer.

  • Techie's paradise for all of the gadget freaks amongst us, combining GPS (of course), Bluetooth, WiFi, internet and RFID. Most people have laptops and/or phones that have WiFi capability. The idea was that a compatible RFID reader would be lent to anyone wanting to complete the multi.

  • A deaf friend of mine suggested a sign language virtual multi where cachers would have to read the online instructions in sign language to get to each stage. A hint would be at each stage and you'd visit the next web site for your next clue. While few cachers are likely to know sign language, it's not an unworthy task to learn.

Naturally these are not suited to everyone. I can't imagine these are even suited to the majority of cachers, but then an abseiling cache is exactly the same, an example of someone taking their own interests and incorporating it into caching.

 

Ultimately, the sport has something for everyone. If you want to give your child some exercise and fresh air then urban caches are great. If you're an adrenaline junkie then by all means grab your carabina and rope and jump off the cliff to your heart's content. The sport will evolve and if that means that people can't get out in to the countryside and set picturesque caches then that's the way it is but it hardly warrants ridiculing those who have taken the time and trouble to set caches that don't meet with your personal preferences.

Link to comment

The sport will evolve and if that means that people can't get out in to the countryside and set picturesque caches then that's the way it is but it hardly warrants ridiculing those who have taken the time and trouble to set caches that don't meet with your personal preferences.

 

What he/she/they said.

Edited by Von-Horst
Link to comment

Went out today and found a cache (first in well over a year i think) got soaked, the youngest daughter had a tantrum and we all got eaten alive by midges!! Why do we do this again!! LOL Picked up a TB though so will be out again soon to move it on. I think the youngest will be staying at home though!

 

I remember your name as you are the owner of the very first Travel Bug I ever picked up: "Back in Black" which was a charity collection tin. That was way back in 2003. Ive just checked and I'm pleased to see it ended up back in your hands.

 

I'm still crazy caching after all those years.

Link to comment

The sport will evolve and if that means that people can't get out in to the countryside and set picturesque caches then that's the way it is but it hardly warrants ridiculing those who have taken the time and trouble to set caches that don't meet with your personal preferences.

 

What he/she/they said.

Criticising an approach that I believe is detrimental to the game as a whole - yes

Ridiculing someone - no

Link to comment

I start and stop...life gets in the way usually. I have other hobbies as well. I tend to go alone since the wife isn't interested and my 7 year old daughter gets tired of looking for caches if we don't find them within a few minutes.

 

I am more picky about what caches I search for as well....I look at the location and difficulty. I have found some caches were just place in a spot for no reason...at least it wasn't apparent to me if there was one. I like a cache to bring me to an interesting spot. If its just a random place in the woods that I have to trudge up hills and through mud to its just not enjoyable to me.

Link to comment
Three excellent sounding ideas, I truly wish you well in getting them set up. That's what caching needs, well thought out caches. :P

 

Getting them set up shouldn't be too difficult. They just need a simple web page setting up for appropriate points.

I've only just recently sold my big bike (and SORNed the little one) as I'm a full time single dad and don't get the time to ride these days. The 'Bikers Only' cache as it's been preliminarily named would be a hundred to two hundred miles across more preferable biking routes.

I'm not a fan of conditional logs but it was agreed that to log the find a photo of them on their bike would be required.

The 'Techie's Paradise' would have to be set up either close to my home or someone close to me whose WiFi network I can monitor, same for Bluetooth etc. The RFID tag could be placed anywhere but if someone wants to borrow a reader from me they'd have to collect it and drop it off afterwards unless they owned one themselves.

The sign language one could go one of two ways. Either with video or images of the signs. Each have their merits. I started tutoring sign language seventeen years ago so coming up with a few hints shouldn't be too difficult.

 

Of course, I'm planning to find a few more before setting any to gain a better understanding of the sport.

Link to comment

I started caching in 2006 and have only completed about 120 caches and have hidden 4 . It looks like I have not cached for a while only because 1. My wife and kids don't like caching. 2. Work commitments. 3. Too many micro's.

I now look specifically for a series of 5, 10, or whatever amount so that I can cover a good distance and see the countryside. The last series I did was 9 miles long and was a good couple of hours out and about. I have done 8 of the UK Mega series but again do not have the time to do them all!!!

For me it is not about the numbers, it is about getting out in the country side and having a good walk. I have been known to do the odd one or two nanos but would not put myself out to do them.

I may reach 200 by the time I am 55 :anibad:

 

FBC

Link to comment

I stopped, but with less than 200 caches in 7 years, some say I never really started :D Anyway the reason I got fed up with it all was micro's and nano's.

I couldn't agree more. I'm just coming up to my 1000th cache and to be honest, I'm finding it a real drag trying to find some "proper" caches these days. I'm visiting the Maidstone area in a few weeks time and I can't believe that nearly all the caches around that area are micro's. What's the point? Unless the current trend changes, I'm afraid that I'm going to be another cacher who reluctantly gives it all up. :D

 

Funnily enough I did consider replying to your post when you first posted. There are some very good micros in the Maidstone area, set not for the size of the container (size really isn't everything ;) ) but for the fun of the search, the view/location, the novelty of the container, the marking of a hike/trail, the location of a clue.

 

I thought it might be useful to list some caches which might enable you to make the most of your visit here.

 

However, I note from your mildly scathing log on one of my early caches that you have already made your visit.

 

With hindsight perhaps I could have left a larger container, however, also with hindsight it is one less location for worthless tat to be left in the countryside.

 

To be honest, I'm surprised you selected it for a visit as it doesn't even have a particularly inspiring description either - but hey, all us new cachers have to live and learn, and setting caches is the best way to learn what works and what doesn't. Yours is the only negative comment it has received so far.

 

Another negative comment I received on a different cache was that I had placed a sparcely filled large container as a cache. Not being one to carry out swaps I had left it for others to do their swapping if they wished - and based on what I have found during my caching, (buttons, clothes lables, corks, stones), I don't think that I will change this approach.

 

An earlier poster could not have said it better:

 

Isn't caching what ever you want it to be?

 

If some enjoy the numbers game. or dashing out at 5 am in the rain to grab a FTF, or spending 7 weeks deciphering some "pointless" puzzle or walking around the gorgeous Cornish coast path picking up a cache or two along the way whilst licking a Kellys cornet or some may even enjoy finding 100 micros in hedges in a day or going to events and meeting loads of other cachers - so what? Can we not all just play it as we like to?

 

I've had great days walking miles over Dartmoor and finding 3 caches and equally great days doing circular walks in Wiltshire and claiming 30 caches and a really good day just finding one 5/5 cache in Devon.

 

If you do visit Maidstone again, perhaps you would like a few suggestions of caches that you might enjoy?

 

As size does seem to be important to you, you probably would love Toms Treasure Chest GCH1B2

which truly lives up to its name.

 

The following are micros - but if you enjoy a bit of a physical challenge you could try Shrek GC1H88G or 4x4 Cache and Dash III - Arms Reach GC1HMPV.

 

If you enjoy a good hike I would like to think that my Hollingbourne Hike and Linton Long Walk are rewarding. Both started out as micro trails with a large bonus cache at the end, however, with experience I have reviewed some of the Linton Long Walk series and 'upsized' some locations to accommodate 'alternative' preferences.

 

I am aware though that the larger the container the more prone to muggles they may be - so this is under review.

 

Anyway, that's that off my chest :laughing:

Link to comment

I've had a break for a while, an umber of reasons, I have been busy with a new business and during the summer I would rather go to the beach on a hot day. My son (my main ally) went to boarding school for two years and is now off to uni, my daughter is now 12 and would rather be with her friends. I did try a few caches on my own but sometimes I felt quite vulnerable. I'm lucky to have a couple of friends to cache with so once school starts we can get out more.

 

I have wished a few times that I had looked up caches and got my GPS ready before travelling but my iPhone has solved that with a holiday cache and an impulse caching session last week, in fact, I now have co-pilot app, the geocache app and battery back up packs so that I can cache on the run if I want to.

Link to comment

 

I'm not a fan of conditional logs but it was agreed that to log the find a photo of them on their bike would be required.

The 'Techie's Paradise' would have to be set up either close to my home or someone close to me whose WiFi network I can monitor, same for Bluetooth etc. The RFID tag could be placed anywhere but if someone wants to borrow a reader from me they'd have to collect it and drop it off afterwards unless they owned one themselves.

The sign language one could go one of two ways. Either with video or images of the signs. Each have their merits. I started tutoring sign language seventeen years ago so coming up with a few hints shouldn't be too difficult.

 

Of course, I'm planning to find a few more before setting any to gain a better understanding of the sport.

 

All good ideas! As a cacher who has found several abseil cachers, and about to place some as well, I have no problem with 'specialist interest' caches, and I am well aware that I'll be lucky to get more than 3 or 4 finds per year on mine, and less after the initial rush! However, we like placing them, others like finding them, and if you can't do them, there's plenty of other caches! Whats more, with some good arguments with the reviewers, you can usually ignore the proximity rule if comparing it to a 'normal' cache.

 

However, regarding your bike cache (as an ex-biker, it sounds a good idea even if I'm not going to be on a bike again!) be warned that your requirement for a photo wouldn't be allowed. Additional Logging requirements (ALRs) are prohibited on any caches, although you can ask for photos. the only type now allowed are termed challenge caches, and have to be a caching related challenge.

 

Of course, if you can make finding the cache so hard that only a biker could do it, then thats perfectly allowable!

 

ta!

 

Dave

Link to comment

I dropped my unprotected Geko on to the tiled kitchen floor a while ago, and it now only shows a blank screen when I switch it on. As it's very old technology, I decided to buy a new GPSr rather than try to get it mended, but am overwhelmed by all the conflicting opinions on which model to get next. So I haven't actually stopped caching, just gone into hiding for a while!

Edited by Mirandapanda
Link to comment

I was just idly reading through the logs of a few older caches and looking at some visitors profiles of those who had not logged many more than 100 caches in total. A large proportion of them logged their last find over a year ago in spite of comments in their logs and in their profile saying what a fantastic hobby geocaching was and how excited they were about it.

 

Why have they suddenly stopped? I can understand family or work commitments getting in the way of a few, but for so many to suddenly stop completely is just beyond me. I don't think it can just be a case of exhausting their local area as there are always new caches coming on line and there are more now than there ever were. :laughing:

 

Well for me caching has cetainly slowed down due to Micro's. I have never been one for worrying about what I find.

 

But am getting increasing hacked off with Mico's only yesterday I drove by a cache and did not even stop... It was a a cache by a play park and had oodles of space for a regular.. But no it was a micro and I thought plainly why bother... Not worth looking for...

 

If it was not for my 600th cache (not logged yet 2 weeks ago) being a really good one I would not off continued...

 

The ones I place seem to get good reviews and I will maintain, I even have a plan for 1 or 2 more quality placements. I will pick some caches from time to time even micros if appropriate, but no more micros on in woods, Ivy or where ever if there is place for a perfectly good cache...

 

I have only been at this a year and have enjoyed doing the caches I have done... I would just like to to see more quality and thought in the placement of caches...

 

Well grumble outed, a much slowed cacher...

 

GerritS

Link to comment

All good ideas!

Thanks. With all this positive feedback I may put them in to effect.

 

However, regarding your bike cache (as an ex-biker, it sounds a good idea even if I'm not going to be on a bike again!) be warned that your requirement for a photo wouldn't be allowed. Additional Logging requirements (ALRs) are prohibited on any caches, although you can ask for photos. the only type now allowed are termed challenge caches, and have to be a caching related challenge.

 

Of course, if you can make finding the cache so hard that only a biker could do it, then thats perfectly allowable!

 

ta!

 

Dave

I've calculated the route using Google Earth. How the hell I'm going to get 61 waypoints incorporated in to this I don't know. I suspect I'll just write a few web pages for the cache and have the bikers go to maybe three pages to give new coordinates at each stop. I'm going to have a word with a few mates and see if they're willing to let me put something in their window or even hide a nano there. I'll come up with something.

Link to comment

Well for me caching has cetainly slowed down due to Micro's. I have never been one for worrying about what I find.

 

But am getting increasing hacked off with Mico's only yesterday I drove by a cache and did not even stop... It was a a cache by a play park and had oodles of space for a regular.. But no it was a micro and I thought plainly why bother... Not worth looking for...

Funny how these threads often finish up with people having a moan about micros! And with good reason. Some are OK I admit, but every time I come across one in a wood, I point out in my log that a bigger box does not take much more imagination! If we all did that, maybe the culprits would eventually get the message! :laughing:

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 13
×
×
  • Create New...