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Breaktrack

How did you serve?

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USAF, 63-67. MoodyAFB Georgia, Philipines, Vietnam, ShawAFB South Carolina. T-33,T-38,RF-4C,RB-66,RB-57,RF-101,RB-71.T-37.

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1970--1972. Conscientious Objector, Draft Status 1-W, Alternative Service Worker. ASW's were required to perform civilian work "contributing to the national safety, health or interest," in my case two years in Nome AK with the Jesuit Volunteer Corp.

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quote:
Originally posted by DJM:

1970--1972. Conscientious Objector, Draft Status 1-W, Alternative Service Worker. ASW's were required to perform civilian work "contributing to the national safety, health or interest," in my case two years in Nome AK with the Jesuit Volunteer Corp.


 

I have to admit I'd never known what the CO's duty obligation was, or what their options were. It's extremely interesting to now have some small idea about it. Learn something every day....lol.

 

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"Trade up, trade even, or don't trade!!!" My philosophy of life.

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US Army 1994 - Present

 

Goodfellow AFB x 2

Field Station Augsburg

Bad Aibling Station

Ft Gordon

Medina RSOC, San Antonio

Camp Humphreys, Korea

Ft Huachuca x 2 (current assignment)

 

Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiari?

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1983 - 1988 US Navy, Radioman second class

 

Navcommsta, Yokosuka, Japan

Precommunit, Theodore Roosevelt CVN-71

 

Proud to have served

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Short version on page 1. What follows is something I wrote when I was getting out in '99. It's a tad lengthy, but I hope you have as much fun reading it as I did living it...

 

A TRUE NAVY ADVENTURE

 

It is a job and an adventure. I’ll leave out the “job” part and just describe the adventure.

 

First of all, in 13 years of service I got my first choice for every change of duty assignment. Other sacrifices have to be made for this to happen, but it can be done. I traveled around the world, visiting Yokosuka, Pusan, Pohang, Hong Kong and Kowloon, Singapore, Olongapo City, Manama, Bahrain, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Esperence, Adelaide and Sydney. Stateside, I was stationed in seven different cities in Florida, Connecticut, California and Missouri. I visited 43 of the 50 states. At one time, I enjoyed the administrative adventure of living in Massachusetts, working in Connecticut, carrying a Missouri drivers’ license, driving a vehicle with Florida tags and making payments on it to a bank in Texas.

 

While serving as an enlisted sailor and later as an officer, I experienced a great variety of military activities, good and bad. I operated a nuclear power plant, piloted a jet aircraft and raced a Navy sailboat in a regatta. I have ridden in or driven all manner of small boats and amphibious vehicles, a hovercraft, two submarines, three aircraft carriers, and four different ships. With eight others, I survived a tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico on a crippled 24-foot Navy sailing yacht. Only the LT and I were functional though, because the other seven were bathing in their own puke below decks.

 

I was only seasick once in all of that time, and that was on the hovercraft! I was also contaminated with radioactive bilge water and sprayed with shrapnel from exploding ordnance. I nearly froze to death in the mountains of South Korea and the hills of Louisiana in January. I nearly cooked to death in the high deserts of California and Arizona. When Mount Pinatubo erupted in the summer of ’91, I was on one of the ships that sprinted to the Philippines to evacuate our people from Clark Air Base and the Subic Bay Naval Station.

 

One of my favorite duties was being the Physical Security Officer on a “special weapons” capable warship, training and leading armed reaction forces to protect against terrorist attack while in port. With that came the additional duty of leading the armed boarding team used to enforce UN sanctions in the Persian Gulf. One of these actions was an unprecedented night boarding only yards from Iraqi waters. On another, I had the pleasure of conducting an intelligence gathering “interview” of an Iraqi ship captain while my men searched his holds for contraband.

 

While assigned to a Marine Corps ANGLICO unit in California, I earned my gold jump wings by voluntarily and dramatically exiting perfectly good aircraft in flight, mostly at night, out of six different kinds of helicopters and airplanes. And I don’t care how many sport freefall jumps you have. Until you have gone “knees to the breeze” at only 800 feet and 120 mph, in total darkness, carrying 100 pounds of gear and an automatic weapon, you are still a “dirty, nasty leg”. While operating with those Marines, I personally directed combined arms support from seven different Naval Gunfire platforms, Army and Marine Corps artillery, Navy Tomcats and Hornets, Marine Corps Harriers, Hornets, Hueys and Cobras, Air Force Falcons, Warthogs and Spectre gunships, and Army Apaches.

 

I am a qualified expert in pistol and rifle marksmanship to Navy standards, but more importantly to Marine Corps standards. I have personally operated the Beretta 9mm and Colt .45 pistols, M-14 and M-16 rifles, Remington and Mossberg 12 gauge shotguns, M-60 and M-249G machine guns, Browning .50 cal machine gun, the 25mm Bushmaster chain gun, M-79 40mm grenade launcher and the main gun of an M-60 main battle tank. I also trained with and operated four different models of laser designators for precision-guided munitions.

 

Without ever being credited with assignment to a “joint tour”, I still managed to serve directly with American Marines, soldiers, SEALs, airmen and coast guardsmen, and South Korean soldiers, sailors and marines. It was my distinct honor to have served with them all. I will gladly swap stories for the rest of my life. No other service, or civilian life, could have provided me a more unique and interesting adventure.

 

SVT + GPS = fast cache

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This is short and to the point:

 

US Army (enlisted)

 

Feb 1991 to present

 

Active duty

 

current duty station (S. Korea)

<that's why I ain't been caching much>

 

my wife and kids have done a few while I have been gone, but not on a scale that I would be doing.

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US Army Signal Corps, 26 Yankee (Satellite Communications Controller) from 1976 to 1980.

 

Lou Catozzi

AKA TxHiPowr

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quote:
Originally posted by Feros Family:

 

Active duty

 

current duty station (S. Korea)

<that's why I ain't been caching much>

 


 

Heck, that's a lot better excuse than the rest of us have...lol.

 

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texasgeocaching_sm.gif

"Trade up, trade even, or don't trade!!!" My philosophy of life.

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I served in the Utah National Guard,8 active 2 inactive, in B company 1457 combat eng. 1985-1991, most noted TDY was "Team sperit 90" in Korea. Then activated for Desert Storm as support in Germany for a year.

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USASA - US Army Security Agency 1967-1971. (and btw Cloak-and-Dagger, I appreciate your signature graphic!)

 

Gary of Team T.

 

[This message was edited by Team Troglodyte on April 18, 2003 at 06:26 AM.]

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United States Coast Guard 1993-1194 active duty aboard USCGC Ironwood WLB-297 180' Ocean going Bouy Tender based out of Kodiak Alaska. Op area included western Alaska from Kodiak out to the tip of the Aleutians, up into the Bering Sea (where storms are born) as far as the ice would let us go. Worked on Navigational Bouys through out the area. Worked on shore based nav aids also, best part of job. Got to hop a few C-130 rides out to remote locations. Did a few fisheries patrols durning Salmon and Crab seasons. Only involved in a few rescues. Spent some time in Seattle also, mostly waiting on medical discharge icon_frown.gif.

 

Had a great time. Glad I am out and free, but would do it all over again. Didn't join till I was 23, wish I had joined right out of High School. Sure did teach me a lot about life.

 

Semper Paratus!

 

McKenna Family

Watsonville CA

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4 years US Army. Just got out 08 JAN. Was a part of 3 ACR at Ft. Carson, CO. Now watching all of my buddies leave for the sandbox. Wish them well.

 

SFOR 7 (Bosnia)

Brightstar 01-02 (Egypt)

NTC *2

Pinon Canyon *3

 

Supporting VICTORY!

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US Army: 1985-1991

Ft Stewart, GA

Camp Casey, Korea

Ft Carson, CO

 

US Army (Washington National Guard): 2002

Everett, WA

 

US Army (Georgia National Guard): 2002-Present

Macon, GA

 

Ohhhhhh, now I understand! A handheld GPS would be a better choice for this sport.

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I was drafted into the United States Army. I was with the 9th Div. "C" Btry 1st Bn 11th Arty. After 6 months in Viet Nam. I was sent to "Dong Ha" with the HQ Co. 1st Bn 44th Arty AW SP. This was a twin 40mm and quad 50cal Battery. 1966-1967. Returned home with 6 months left. Reasigned to Fort Ord,CA with the 54th MP's. I am Proud to have served my Country.

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Army Security Agency 1967-71. I did basic at Ft. Ord, then 9 months at Ft. Devens, Mass, for training. I arrived in Vietnam in November of 1968, and was assigned to the 8th Radio Research Field Station at Phu Bai. After Vietnam I was stationed at Two Rock Ranch Station near Petaluma, CA.

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USAF 1976-1980 Jet Mechanic, 2 years Torrejon AB, Spain, working on F-4C's, 2 years in Texas working on Trainers, T-38's and T-37's.

 

Cheers!

TL

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Enlisted in Army in 1990. Active duty 90-94, Nat. Guard 94-Present. Military Technician 97-Present.

 

4th I.D. Colorado 90-91

AirAssault Ft. Hood 91

76th Trans Germany 91-94

116th Cav Bde 94-Present

 

Been all over the US & Europe. Unfortuneately I've never been over to the big desert, yet. Lots of mixed love/hate feelings at times, but still think all young adults should join a service for at least a year or two. A great life experience!

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You may not always support the cause, But ALWAYS support our Troops!!!!

 

If you hide it, I'll find it!!!!

EVENTUALLY...

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U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman(active duty) 4rs, Wisconsin Army National Guard 91-B (field medic) 3yrs, U.S. Naval Reserve Hospital Corpsman (2yrs), U.S. Navy Medical Officer (very possible, after I finish med school.

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101st ABN DIV. 73-6. Enlisted because Viet Nam was "over" and the benny package was sweet. Sent to Nam TDY because of critical MOS to help Marines evacuate Saigon, 28 years ago, seems like yesterday. Don't regret a thing, but would NEVER do it again. War sucks.

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quote:
Originally posted by DocJ:

U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman(active duty) 4rs, Wisconsin Army National Guard 91-B (field medic) 3yrs, U.S. Naval Reserve Hospital Corpsman (2yrs), U.S. Navy Medical Officer (very possible, after I finish med school.


 

Best of luck with that DocJ. I have two sons still in the Navy, they need good doctors to take care of them.

 

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texasgeocaching_sm.gif

"Trade up, trade even, or don't trade!!!" My philosophy of life.

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My family is well represented in the military. My father was USMC and aboard ship in Pearl Harbor on 12-7-41, finished the war with six months in Japan. Father in law 20 years USAF retired 0-6. Mother in law army nurse in New Zealnad in WW II. Oldest sister army nurse in Viet Nam 69-70, 27th Surgical Evac Hospital Chu Lai, RVN. Oldest brother class of 71 West Point. Next youngest brother retired 20 years running reactors on submarines. Baby brother 12 years USAF.

 

Myself 6 years army in Okinawa, Korea, Texas, Fort Lewis, and Fort Knox. Photographer, 9th Infantry Division Artillery, and 8th Army Inspector General inspection team. Now I serve the veterans working in the cardiac cath lab at the Portland VA Medical Center.

 

My oldest son served in USAF, my youngest son just got out of the army as a cavalry scout with 3rd Armored Division.

 

Thanks to all who served and those who support them .

 

To my dad Semper Fi.

 

I've gone to look for myself, if I should return before I get back, please keep me here.

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United States Air Force, 1981-1987.

 

Served most of my term at Offutt AFB, NE, assigned to the 6949th Electronic Security Squadron. Frequently TDY to Howard AFB, Panama and Kelly AFB, Medina Annex, TX.

 

Trained at

Lackland AFB, TX (basic training)

Presidio of Monterey, CA (language school)

Goodfellow AFB, TX (technical equipment)

Fairchild AFB, WA (survival training)

 

Anyone who was on that track knows what kind of work I was doing, and anyone else who's really interested can probably Google a pretty good guess icon_wink.gif

 

As for noteworthy achievments: I was one of thousands who received a medal for Grenada, but my involvement was very slight.

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It does lend more credibility to know all of you have "been there."

 

DUSTOFF is the callsign used by Army Medical Evacuation(MEDEVAC) helicopters in Vietnam and has stuck with us as a rememberance to our fallen heros. We use it proudly even today as a callsign so the troops know they are in good hands.

 

Dedicated Unhesitating Service To Our Fighting

Forces

 

www.dustoff.org

 

Myself:

236th DUSTOFF, Landstuhl, Germany

",Bosnia

",Kosovo

229th and USAAAD, Mountain DUSTOFF, FT Drum, NY

 

Also: OH-58 pilot in Haiti(incl 8 days on CVN-69 USS D.D. Eisenhower).

DUSTOFF!

 

[This message was edited by DUSTOFF8 on May 10, 2003 at 11:18 AM.]

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quote:
Originally posted by Breaktrack:

Now call me shallow if you wish but knowing someone served, in whatever capacity, in our nation's forces gives them a little more credibiity with me when it comes to what they say. It sort of says they've walked the walk, not just talked the talk.


 

Sorry, but you could not be more wrong. Military service and credibility are two different things. My dad went to Vietnam as an infantry commander, and the stink of it is that he screwed up and got sent to the rear. But the minute my dad got back it was Nam this and Nam that and if you haven't been there and back then you can screw off, shove it, etc. I mean this guy to listen to him was the biggest war hero known to man, when in reality he was the biggest screwup the Army ever saw.

 

This doesn't mean I don't appreciate the people who serve -- obviously I do. But when I hear someone say that they served in the military, I take it with a grain of salt, because I saw first hand that military service and credibility (and honor, self respect, fair treatment of your family) do not always go hand in hand.

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06-06-66 to 12-19-69: U.S.Navy aboard the Destroyer Lyman K. Swenson, DD729. Two tours in Viet Nam.

 

What if the Hokey Pokey really is what it's all about?

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83-present

 

3 years 31M in 501st Sig BN, 101st ABN Div

17 or so years Army Spec OPs in 10th SFG(A) 18E and now 18Z.

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Civilian support. Started out in weapons research and ended up in Iraq around the Dessert Storm period. Never actually got to enter the service coz of a health problem. Tried to get in twice but no go. Still got shot at on two occasions. They missed both times but one was close enugh to make me shake for a while.

 

Only nuts eat squirrels,

Snake

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quote:
Originally posted by claypigeon58:

quote:
Originally posted by Breaktrack:

Now call me shallow if you wish but knowing someone served, in whatever capacity, in our nation's forces gives them a little more credibiity with me when it comes to what they say. It sort of says they've walked the walk, not just talked the talk.


 

Sorry, but you could not be more wrong. Military service and credibility are two different things. My dad went to Vietnam as an infantry commander, and the stink of it is that he screwed up and got sent to the rear. But the minute my dad got back it was Nam this and Nam that and if you haven't been there and back then you can screw off, shove it, etc. I mean this guy to listen to him was the biggest war hero known to man, when in reality he was the biggest screwup the Army ever saw.

 

This doesn't mean I don't appreciate the people who serve -- obviously I do. But when I hear someone say that they served in the military, I take it with a grain of salt, because I saw first hand that military service and credibility (and honor, self respect, fair treatment of your family) do not always go hand in hand.


 

Sorry, but YOU couldn't be more wrong... sorry, couldn't resist, lol. My original post stands. One thing that is as true as anything existing in this life is the saying: "There is an exception to every rule!"

 

I am truly sorry you had such a bad experience with someone who put on airs they had not earned, especially someone as close to you, but it does not change the vast number of individuals who serve with courage, distinction, and patriotism on a daily basis in our armed forces. To paint such a noble group with the brush dipped in the questionable behaviour of one man is not a fair representation. I've served in three different services, both active duty and reserves, over a 27 year period of time, and I met my fair share of knotheads, don't get me wrong, but by far they are overshadowed almost into nonexistence by those serving with honor.

 

So, if you don't mind, I'll give someone who has served the benefit of the doubt till they prove me wrong either by word or deed.

 

JMHO.

 

texasgeocaching_sm.gif

"Trade up, trade even, or don't trade!!!" My philosophy of life.

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United States Army Security Agency - 1960 to 1962

 

I am happy to see other ASA fellows here.

 

I was at Ft. Devens, Massachusetts for a year, 1959 to 1960, then spent the remainder of time in Chitose, Japan. (Forewarned Is Forearmed) Then got extended for awhile because of Cuban Missile thing.

 

I was RA because when I was drafted I took another year so that I could get into the ASA.

 

As I recall, I didn't like it at the time, but now I am sincerely glad I did my time with the military.

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Canadian Armed Forces 1985-86

attached to the canadian forces school of military engineering, chilliwack, british columbia.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

hey... what's that smell?

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I am active duty Ariforce. I am a SSgt in the Security Forces carrer feild. I have been in for five years and have had the opportunity to go to Oman, Bahrain, Turkey, Spain, Italy, The Netherlands, Germany and most recently Kuwait and Iraq.

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1976-1995. The first four years were in the 2-504th IN, The remainder of the years were spent in the Artillery, 1 AD, 2ID, 101st AASLT, Drill Sergeant, Artillery Training Center. In a round about way, I'm still serving. I work as a civil service tech for artillery computer systems. I'm currently in Kuwait in support of the troops.

 

Madog "Discover of America, ca 1169"

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US NAVY, 1970-1974, Sonar Technician (SS), USS Daniel Boone SSBN 629B. Charleston SC/Holy Lock Scotland. 1975-1995, Ocean Systems Technician Analyst, MIUWU 604/205, Lewes, DE.

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US Army/WA National Guard, 1987-1997

 

Basic Training, D Co, 4/39 Infantry, Ft Dix, NJ, 1987

F Co, Pres of Monterey, CA, 1988

Goodfellow AFB, TX/Ft Devens, MA, 1989

C Co, 4th Bn, 123rd Avn Regt, Ft Wainwright, AK 1989-1993 (6th Infantry Division[L])

B Co, 341st MI Bn, WA Army National Guard, 1994-1997

 

I created a travel bug (currently AWOL) out of my aircrew wings and 6th ID patch, called "The Death Star," after the nickname we had for the 6th's six-pointed star insignia.

 

The Death Star

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16 years active duty (so far). Chief Warrant Officer, currently in post-graduate Masters program at JMIC in DC. Follow-on assignment to Fort Lewis, Washington in September...

 

Previous assignments:

 

Case Officer - Joint Task Force Full Accounting (Camp H.M. Smith, Hawaii)

involved in investigating, locating, and recovering remains of US personnel MIA in Southeast Asia (Laos, Cambodia, & Vietnam). Spent some time in Vietnam's Central Highlands, but didn't place any caches (hard to maintain).

 

G2 ACE Order of Battle WO - 101st Airborne Div (Fort Campbell, Kentucky)

spent alot of time in the field, playin' soldier

 

G2 ACE Order of Battle WO - 2d Infantry Div (Camp Red Cloud, Uijongbu, ROK)

spent my time north of the 'smile line'

 

Battalion Task Force S2 O/C - Joint Readiness Training Center (Fort Polk, Louisiana)

 

S2 Senior All Source Intelligence Analyst - 3/325 Airborne Battalion Combat Team (Vicenza, Italy)

jumped into Germany (Bunker DZ & Spichersdorf DZ serveral times), Sardinia on training. Deployed to N. Iraq in '91.

 

CASMAP analyst / SSR - CBTI Co, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) (Fort Devens, Massachusetts)

jumped into Sculthorpe RAF, UK for FLINTLOCK exercises.

 

I don't know if military service makes anyone a paragon of integrity and virtue, but it sure teaches you how to read a map (unless you're a 2LT)

 

Reminds me of a joke:

Q: What's the most dangerous weapon the enemy has?

A: A U.S. second lieutenant with a map & compass (or GPS receiver)...

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Australian Army, Air Defence Artillery, Sergeant in Charge of a SAM and a Recruit Instructor for two years. Bombardier of the year '87. Served 10 years total, 1986 to 96. First Bombardier (Corporal) to be in charge of a SAM firing at sea on HMAS Westralia. "Driving" the Westralia every day (almost) for four months up to Nagasaki was one of the best times of my life. Jogging round the deck (15 times = 5Km) and looking over the side and seeing Krakatoa smoking away in the glassy warm seas up that way was an amazing experience. Worked with some American Air Defence Guys from Hawaii in Darwin in about '87. They were funny guys!!!

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I served 9 months mandatory military service in Tank Brigade in Parolannummi, southern Finland. I was commissioned also twice. In addition of how to shoot, I also learned how to cut throat, how to hit mans nasal bone inside the brains and many other "useful" things... Fortunately i have never had to use these skills. And i have managed to avoid military refresher courses icon_biggrin.gif

 

70242_1300.gif

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Sorry it took me so long to post. I only became aware of this thread today. I was in the US Navy from 04/78 - 04/78. I retired as an Electronics Technician First Class. I got to travel a great deal.

San Diego, CA - Boot Camp and Basic Electronics School

Great Lakes, IL - Advances Electronics School

Mare Island (Vallejo), CA - technical training

USS Tarawa, San Diego, CA - duty, got to see Hawaii, Phillipines, Thailand, Kenya, Diego Garcia, Perth, Australia, Korea, and Okinawa, and Long Beach, CA (shipyard overhaul).

Ft. Gordon, GA - technical training

Kolsaas, Norway - duty

Little Creek and NOB, VA - training

Holy Loch, Scotland - duty (USS Simon Lake AS-33)

New London, CT - duty

Sigonella, Sicily, Italy - duty

Corpus Christi NAS - outprocess

 

texasgeocaching_sm.gif

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Wow a lot of USAF and Security Police to boot...Cool!

 

1988-1992 USAF Security Police , Law Enforcement Specialist

 

Kwang-Ju AB, Korea

Edwards AFB, California (Space Shuttle recovery team)

Howard AFB, Panama (TDY)

 

Brian

 

As long as you're going to think anyway, think big. -Donald Trump

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Centex, how you like Ft Gordon? We are from Augusta...

 

Brian

 

As long as you're going to think anyway, think big. -Donald Trump

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Ten years as a "part timer", National Guard. 15 now as a "full timer", AGR - Active National Guard. All in armor, from the M60, M60A3, M1, M1IP, M1A1, and most recently the M1A1HA. Much of the active time as an instructor on the tanks with CVTTT, one of the best uses your tax dollars ever went towards. Only 5 more to go, and I'll retire with 30 for pay.

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Civilian Contractor

Air America Air Asia, out of the Philippines.

66 ~ 69 All over Southeast Asia, and then some.

 

Mzee ~~~ "And now where"

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Well, _I_ serve by being the one to keep the homefires burning, the care packages coming, and the memory of him strong in his children. He serves in the U.S. Army, 1995 to present. He is the one to sleep in the dirt, brush sand out of his teeth, and hope the dogs don't forget who he is and attack him on his way into the house after a long mission. I don't see him often, and I miss him greatly, but I couldn't be more proud. In fact, right now I have the floopy butterflies in my stomach, because he will be home (for a short amount of time) SOON....someday I won't know what to do when its time for him to be home for GOOD!(I don't think he will either!)

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