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Wrapping caches in bin liners?


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I've just had 4 new caches put on hold and told to remove the bin liners wrapped round them. I can't remember the last cache I visited that wasn't wrapped in a bin liner, when the cache was a plastic tub. They seem to do a good job of keeping water away and help with hiding the cache. There's no mention in the guidelines about using or not using these when setting caches, unless someone can point me to a different set of guidelines?

 

Views?

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I've just had 4 new caches put on hold and told to remove the bin liners wrapped round them. I can't remember the last cache I visited that wasn't wrapped in a bin liner, when the cache was a plastic tub. They seem to do a good job of keeping water away and help with hiding the cache. There's no mention in the guidelines about using or not using these when setting caches, unless someone can point me to a different set of guidelines?

 

Views?

 

From the Groundspeak Guidelines:

 

"In addition, there may be local regulations already in place for certain types of parks in your region (state parks, county preserves, etc.). There are many local caching organizations that would be able to help you out with those regulations."

 

In the UK, this refers to the G.A.G.B. The UK reviewers ask that cache placer follow the GAGB Guidelines.

 

No 9 "Cache containers should not be placed inside a polythene bag."

 

MrsB :huh:

 

 

It's about time this Topic was aired again :)

Edited by The Blorenges
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The bag gets wet inside, bugs, slugs and slime get in the bag -making the cache undesirable to unwrap -and the bag itself deteriorates... making it look like rubbish -and thus likely to be thrown away as rubbish.

 

A cache wrapped in a bag gets wetter, and stays wetter longer, than a decent container ever does!

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snip. I can't remember the last cache I visited that wasn't wrapped in a bin liner, when the cache was a plastic tub.snip

Views?

 

Perhaps not a very good memory?

 

There are caches that you have found in the last seven days that are certainly not wrapped in bags.

 

That apart, they end up tatty/torn, slug collection devices that pose a risk to animals.

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I would prefer not to find a cache wrapped in a bin liner or any kind of plastic bag. Sure you may think that it adds protection, but after a time the inside of the bag becomes wet too and very smelly. The bag and box become upleasant to handle, and the stink gets on your hands and will not disappear even after washing several times.

A good cache container can protect your log book and contents without very much of a problem for a long time. So long as you put special items and your logbook in small ziplock bags inside your cache a small amount of moisture inside the container will do no harm.

I have had a cache in the same tupperware type container since 2002 when I first placed it, I have never used a plastic bag. It has had some small amounts of water in it at times, usually when the last finder has not been careful when replacing the lid. Regular maintenance and also responding to reports of problems as soon as they arise has ensured its survival.

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Bin liners are a really bad idea. I can't find anything particular in the guidelines forbidding them, but there probably ought to be something, and I applaud any attempt to prevent caches being published with them. The risk to wildlife alone is enough to qualify them as a threat to the image of the game, and as others have noted, they have exactly the opposite effect to what you might hope for. Indeed, most bin liners are designed to be biodegradable, meaning that after a few weeks in the open, they will be full of holes, and yes, this does in fact happen.

 

If there's nothing in the guidelines, it could just be that they are not common in the US, whose caching scene is the one which most influences the guidelines. In my experience the country where you are most likely to have to extract a cache from a slimy bin liner is Germany - where I've found at least three ammo boxes in bin liners :) , and even there, a definite downward trend is noticeable.

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Ye olde bin bag debate..........................AGAIN................... :) Mongers has covered it FULLY. lets close the thread and live happily.

 

Oh, heck NO!

 

We can get at least 2 pages out of this debate if we all try hard enough.

 

MrsB :huh:

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Ye olde bin bag debate..........................AGAIN................... :) Mongers has covered it FULLY. lets close the thread and live happily.

 

Oh, heck NO!

 

We can get at least 2 pages out of this debate if we all try hard enough.

 

MrsB :huh:

 

I'm sure the last one was 3 pages

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I've just had 4 new caches put on hold and told to remove the bin liners wrapped round them. I can't remember the last cache I visited that wasn't wrapped in a bin liner, when the cache was a plastic tub. .....

How about an alternative approach? Try using containers that by themselves are weatherproof so that manky bin bags are unnecessary.

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Ye olde bin bag debate..........................AGAIN................... :) Mongers has covered it FULLY. lets close the thread and live happily.

Why not have a fresh debate about this? It's a forum, not a library and the OPer has already demonstrated that they have not been able to find extant guidelines about not using plastic bags, they are unlikely, therefore, to peruse these forums for such information, so why not freshen it up? :huh:

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Why not have a fresh debate about this? It's a forum, not a library and the OPer has already demonstrated that they have not been able to find extant guidelines about not using plastic bags, they are unlikely, therefore, to peruse these forums for such information, so why not freshen it up? :)

Very true and discussion is the whole point of this area. However there's no need to peruse the whole forum as entering "bin liner" into the search box brings up a lot of relevant threads including this one which I just bumped for convenience.

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It's all been said before, but the only bag that seems to work is the drawstring / proofed camo bag (normally on sale from your local UK geocachers on-line store). Not such a cheap option, and does sometimes harbour a slug or two, but nothing like as bad as the bin liner as it doesn't stay damp inside and doesn't rip to shreds. Does a great job of keeping the cache safe from muggles too, and you don't need to get involved with sandpaper and paint.

 

Whatever some say, even the best lock-lock boxes get damp and grubby after a year or two. Every one of the Tupperware type I've found recently has been damp, except those protected by a camo bag. They were pristine.

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I must admit, when I placed my first caches I put them in plastic bags thinking that it would afford them extra protection. It wasn't until a certain Scottish haggis fella pointed out the down side to this, that I went back and found the bags with holes in them, slugs crawling about inside, and a smell that didn't agree with me. The bags were quickly removed and the caches have been fine since then (nearly 4 years).

I think cache placement is another thing to consider in respect of how your cache will hold up thoughout the year.

Edited by Jacobite
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First things first, thanks for contributing to the game and setting caches. :huh:

 

I usually remove plastic bags caches are wrapped in ... to the nearest bin!

 

Having said that, I rarely see them these days, perhaps only one or two in the past year, so you must be living in a plastic bag hotspot undermanager!

 

As has been said before, concentrate on getting the cache itself waterproof, as an extra precaution you can always put the contents of the cache into a bag INSIDE the outer container. :)

 

Good luck with your new caches!

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Interesting debate. I always thought the purpose of discussion forums was to discuss, and since new people start geocaching all the time, debates will inevitably, and rightly, be revisited. Sadly, this will always irritate a small minority who clearly are very experienced and knowlegeable and I bow low to them with the shame of my ignorance and apologise. Thanks to the posters in this thread who have been more understanding and constructive. Before posting, I looked both for an FAQ and searched the UK forum for bin liner, plastic bag etc. I clearly didn't look hard or long enough or I'd have found the links refered to. I can understand the argument for no plastic bags and have, you'll all be delighted to hear, removed them this morning. Once again, my sincere apologies for upsetting the Masters of Geocaching here and promise I will not post any more posts asking for views and opinions.

 

:)

Edited by undermanager
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Interesting debate. I always thought the purpose of discussion forums was to discuss, and since new people start geocaching all the time, debates will inevitably, and rightly, be revisited. Sadly, this will always irritate a small minority who clearly are very experienced and knowlegeable and I bow low to them with the shame of my ignorance and apologise. Before posting, I looked both for an FAQ and searched the UK forum for bin liner, plastic bag etc. I clearly didn't look hard or long enough or I'd have found the links refered to. I can understand the argument for no plastic bags and have, you'll all be delighted to hear, removed them this morning. Once again, my sincere apologies for upsetting the Masters of Geocaching here and promise I will not post any more posts asking for views and opinions.

 

:huh:

 

You're quite right to bring this subject back up again, as new cachers like yourself can't always see the answers they are looking for in a mountain of threads. Don't be put off by others opinions, they are after all, just opinions. I would hate to think that new cachers felt intimidated by the responses given to perfectly reasonable questions.

 

Happy cach'in :)

Edited by Jacobite
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Interesting debate. I always thought the purpose of discussion forums was to discuss, and since new people start geocaching all the time, debates will inevitably, and rightly, be revisited. Sadly, this will always irritate a small minority who clearly are very experienced and knowlegeable and I bow low to them with the shame of my ignorance and apologise. Thanks to the posters in this thread who have been more understanding and constructive. Before posting, I looked both for an FAQ and searched the UK forum for bin liner, plastic bag etc. I clearly didn't look hard or long enough or I'd have found the links refered to. I can understand the argument for no plastic bags and have, you'll all be delighted to hear, removed them this morning. Once again, my sincere apologies for upsetting the Masters of Geocaching here and promise I will not post any more posts asking for views and opinions.

 

:D

 

Don't let 'em get to you undermanager ... they were new once and simply cannot remember it! :angry:

 

Keep your enquiries coming, there are plenty of reasonable people here who will be happy to point you in the right direction. :D

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I must admit, when I placed my first caches I put them in plastic bags thinking that it would afford them extra protection. It wasn't until a certain Scottish haggis fella pointed out the down side to this, that I went back and found the bags with holes in them, slugs crawling about inside, and a smell that didn't agree with me. The bags were quickly removed and the caches have been fine since then (nearly 4 years).

I think cache placement is another thing to consider in respect of how your cache will hold up thoughout the year.

I was that man, and like Jacobite I started off by placing my caches in placcy bags. It wasn't until that Lacto guy asked me to reconsider that I realised the huge downsides, and when going back to my caches realised how mank they really get. None of my caches are in bags now, and I always advise owners to remove them if I find one.

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This just serves to illustrate the regional/geographical differences in geocaching. For the UK the GAGB publishes the guidelines (rules) specific to the UK, but unfortunately few cachers will visit their pages, especially in the early stages.

It would be good if GSP provided a link to the regional/national pages from the main guidelines page.

 

In the UK, a good locking plastic tub will usually suffice, anything with a hermetic seal. :D The weather just isn't extreme enough to rapidly deteriorate the plastic.

 

The problem lies with the 'bin bag' being used as a prime means of defence against water ingress around a poorly sealed tub; as had already been said - it does the complete opposite.

 

We're not on page 2 yet!!! :angry:

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"Ye olde bin bag debate"

 

"Why not have a fresh debate about this? It's a forum, not a library"

 

"Interesting debate. I always thought the purpose of discussion forums was to discuss, and since new people start geocaching all the time, debates will inevitably, and rightly, be revisited."

 

Absolutely! There is absolutely NO reason why old debates cannot be revisited. It is hugely intimidating and off putting when as a newbie you post a question, full of enthusiasm about your new hobby, when you hit the forums and you get the "been there - done that" response. Nobody is obliged to respond to a thread.

 

To get back to the bin liner story.... Despite all the debate on the forums bin-liners are still very popular, so there is still a lot of footwork to be done to swing the belief that bin-liners do help. Even I have to admit, placing your poor brand new lock-'n-lock all on its ownsome in that spot can seem intimidating, and the temptation can be great to cover it in a bag.

Edited by the pooks
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"Ye olde bin bag debate"

 

"Why not have a fresh debate about this? It's a forum, not a library"

 

"Interesting debate. I always thought the purpose of discussion forums was to discuss, and since new people start geocaching all the time, debates will inevitably, and rightly, be revisited."

 

Absolutely! There is absolutely NO reason why old debates cannot be revisited. It is hugely intimidating and off putting when as a newbie you post a question, full of enthusiasm about your new hobby, when you hit the forums and you get the "been there - done that" response. Nobody is obliged to respond to a thread.

 

To get back to the bin liner story.... Despite all the debate on the forums bin-liners are still very popular, so there is still a lot of footwork to be done to swing the belief that bin-liners do help. Even I have to admit, placing your poor brand new lock-'n-lock all on its ownsome in that spot can seem intimidating, and the temptation can be great to cover it in a bag.

 

simple cover it in paint instead, put it in a camo bag but not a polythene bag!

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'Paint the box black'

 

Now that's really a good thought. I think I'm going to have to carry some paint with me when I next maintain the caches!! Has anyone painted plastic boxes? I wonder what kind of paint sticks best. You could have some extra fun with this!! I can feel a new idea germinating ....

 

Would you say that it is acceptable to remove plastic bags from caches when you come across them, or is that a No No? Is it better to ask for them to be removed by the owner instead?

 

:angry:

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'Paint the box black'

 

Now that's really a good thought. I think I'm going to have to carry some paint with me when I next maintain the caches!! Has anyone painted plastic boxes? I wonder what kind of paint sticks best. You could have some extra fun with this!! I can feel a new idea germinating ....

 

Would you say that it is acceptable to remove plastic bags from caches when you come across them, or is that a No No? Is it better to ask for them to be removed by the owner instead?

 

:D

 

There's an exception to every rule, but see my post #210 HERE. We should all try to keep things tidy. Generally, I'd say remove it and post in your log why you have done it, that way the owner and other cachers will learn why. It might be that the owner didn't do it; some 'well meaning' individual may have taken it upon themselves to do it, thinking they were helping. :angry:

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If the bin bag is reasonably intact on a cache I've found I wouldn't get rid of it. It's up to the cache owner to sort it out and I'd merely pass on my opinion that the bag is unsuitable. Otherwise you might deprive the cache of its cover and protection, whilst not giving the placer the chance to find an alternative. After all, they may be unable to get to the cache for another month, so in the meantime the bag will just have to do.

 

Paintwise; it's a good option for concealment, but unless you're really good at preparing and painting several coats the paint does wear off even a sanded surface. And you still get the water ingress problem sooner or later (unless it's an ammo box, or placed very carefully). Lots of creative options exist for disguising boxes though; this forum has hundreds of examples (see this thread for instance).

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'Paint the box black'

 

Now that's really a good thought. I think I'm going to have to carry some paint with me when I next maintain the caches!! Has anyone painted plastic boxes? I wonder what kind of paint sticks best. You could have some extra fun with this!! I can feel a new idea germinating ....

 

Would you say that it is acceptable to remove plastic bags from caches when you come across them, or is that a No No? Is it better to ask for them to be removed by the owner instead?

 

:D

 

There's an exception to every rule, but see my post #210 HERE. We should all try to keep things tidy. Generally, I'd say remove it and post in your log why you have done it, that way the owner and other cachers will learn why. It might be that the owner didn't do it; some 'well meaning' individual may have taken it upon themselves to do it, thinking they were helping. :angry:

 

In fact I've just remembered, a couple of years ago one of my caches gained a bag; I went out the next day to remove it and re-hide in correct location. Found it wrapped in an old fertilizer bag or something similarly heavy duty... (names removed to save embarrassment etc as they meant well)

June 6, 2006 by xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Cache not hidden, it is possible that the people who have cut the hedging back had disturbed it and then re-hidden it. We wrapped container in a plastic bag, to make it less obvious, then hid it close to the tree. TNLN. TFTC.

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'Paint the box black'

 

Would you say that it is acceptable to remove plastic bags from caches when you come across them, or is that a No No? Is it better to ask for them to be removed by the owner instead?

 

:angry:

 

 

I always remove plastic bags unless they are essential for camoflage or, as long as they are not full of holes, needed for waterproofing. One I left was a large, square, bright orange, biscuit box wrapped in a tasteful green bag originating from a well known Egyptian bazzar in Kinghtsbridge. In this case the bag was intact and moderately snail free and was essential for both camo and waterproofing. Otherwise, for me, they come under the heading of CITO.

Edited by Just Roger
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.... Sadly, this will always irritate a small minority who clearly are very experienced and knowlegeable and I bow low to them with the shame of my ignorance and apologise. ...<snip>...Once again, my sincere apologies for upsetting the Masters of Geocaching here and promise I will not post any more posts asking for views and opinions.

Charmed I'm sure. A little bit of what was intended to be helpful advice leads to immediate dollops of sarcasm. Nice. :angry:

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Charmed I'm sure. A little bit of what was intended to be helpful advice leads to immediate dollops of sarcasm. Nice. :angry:

To be fair, the helpful advice was laced with put-downs of an "RTFM" nature, questioning whether the thread should have been started in the first place. A fair enough response, imo.

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'Paint the box black'

 

Now that's really a good thought. I think I'm going to have to carry some paint with me when I next maintain the caches!! Has anyone painted plastic boxes? I wonder what kind of paint sticks best. You could have some extra fun with this!! I can feel a new idea germinating ....

 

Would you say that it is acceptable to remove plastic bags from caches when you come across them, or is that a No No? Is it better to ask for them to be removed by the owner instead?

 

:D

 

just for future information, I *think* that when you search these forums, the default timescale is last 30 days. We probably haven't discussed this old chestnut for quite a while now, which might explain why you didn't find any old threads...

 

Anyway, as others have said, the best bet is to get some lock n lock types plastic boxes. These are pretty watertight, and therefore don't need further protection. The most important thing is to make sure the container itself is waterproof. As you can imagine, Carte D'or Boxes, margerine tubs, Cardbury's Highlight pots and so on aren't even close. You can usually guess which ones are waterproof, but how about taking a shower with the container to see!

 

As for Camo, I swear by Duck Tape - I have a roll of black and a roll of silver, and I have caches that are still as good as new after 3 years. The downside with paint (IMO) is the extra preparation and it can flake after a while.

 

Hope that helps!

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... As for Camo, I swear by Duck Tape - I have a roll of black and a roll of silver, and I have caches that are still as good as new after 3 years. The downside with paint (IMO) is the extra preparation and it can flake after a while.

 

Hope that helps!

 

We use some camo duct/duck* tape too, which came from USA. It's brilliant for caches in woody/brackeny/leafy places. I don't know whether you can get it in UK shops, but I've seen it on Ebay.

 

FWIW, I think this Topic is worth airing again: As the other bumped topic reveals it's 2½ years since it was talked about here in any detail. Newer cachers are often unaware of the GAGB Guidelines which I linked to in an earlier post and, yes, it might be helpful if there was some way that they could be directed to 'local guidelines' from the cache submission form that everyone fills in. As it stands at the moment, I think the Reviewers usually inform cache setters about these extra guidelines when/if they have concerns about something on the submitted cache page.

 

MrsB

 

*Which is it? Or shall we not start that debate again?

 

We must be overdue for one of those 'bad grammar' topics too...

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We use some camo duct/duck* tape too, which came from USA. It's brilliant for caches in woody/brackeny/leafy places. I don't know whether you can get it in UK shops, but I've seen it on Ebay.

 

*Which is it? Or shall we not start that debate again?

 

My 'Real Tree' camo tape is very definitely of the 'Duck' variety and I bought it from a local 'country pursuits' shop. I've also seen it for sale in fishing tackle shops and gunsmiths so it might be worth enquiring along those lines. :D-_-

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Camo Tape is available at any reputable local Geocacher's online store.

 

But I maintain that lock'n'lock boxes do let in water, so you'll also have to make sure that the contents are bagged up inside the container.

 

The only tab-lock boxes that I've found that let in water were a set of really cheap ones from Woolworth's (on offer as a set of 7 for two or three quid). They were total rubbish and you could see that the soft plastic seal in the lid wasn't even making contact with the box rim. Filling one up with water and inverting it proved the point as the water just ran out. On the other hand, I've used some much better quality ones from Lakeland Plastics that have been totally watertight. In fact, I used one for my very first cache in early 2003 and subsequently recycled it for use in a current cache. It's been out in all weathers for almost 6 years now and the seal integrity is as good now as it was when I bought it. Like everything else in life.... you get what you pay for. :D

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Charmed I'm sure. A little bit of what was intended to be helpful advice leads to immediate dollops of sarcasm. Nice. :D

To be fair, the helpful advice was laced with put-downs of an "RTFM" nature, questioning whether the thread should have been started in the first place. A fair enough response, imo.

To be sure I re-read what I posted. I quote:

Very true and discussion is the whole point of this area. However there's no need to peruse the whole forum as entering "bin liner" into the search box brings up a lot of relevant threads including this one which I just bumped for convenience.

Could you please point out the put-downs there? As for "RTFM", the OP had intimated that he'd (she'd?) spent time persuing the forum, I shared the results of a quick search I made. I thought I was helping a new contributor, obviously I shouldn't have bothered.

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How about GC1KTQQ published two days ago.

"The cache is a normal tupperware box inside a carrier bag."

Gordy

 

A good one to bring up..

The owner is a fairly recent member (4 months), they have only found 24 (reasonable figure), this is their first cache and they have never posted in the forums.

 

Perhaps Deceangi was having an off day when he published it?

 

I've just sent the following to the cache owners ...

Hello there

I'm just dropping you this message as your cache has been mentioned in the UK geocaching forum under the topic of 'Wrapping caches in bin liners?'

 

You can find it here

http://forums.Groundspeak.com/GC/index.php...mp;qpid=3796582

 

Your cache came up because the description mentions being wrapped in a plastic bag.

 

happy caching - careygang

 

So perhaps they will join in the discussion/debate :D

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My experience of black bin liners.....

I recently stayed in a Travelodge...they do not allow you to leave your bag when you check out to spend the day caching.Railway stations rarely have left luggage theses days either.

So I used said bin liner to wrap my bag to keep the weather off when I hid it in a bush.

I've done this a few times now....it's easy to hide a large bag in town for us cachers! :D

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How about GC1KTQQ published two days ago.

"The cache is a normal tupperware box inside a carrier bag."

Gordy

 

A good one to bring up..

The owner is a fairly recent member (4 months), they have only found 24 (reasonable figure), this is their first cache and they have never posted in the forums.

 

Perhaps Deceangi was having an off day when he published it?

 

I've just sent the following to the cache owners ...

Hello there

I'm just dropping you this message as your cache has been mentioned in the UK geocaching forum under the topic of 'Wrapping caches in bin liners?'

 

You can find it here

http://forums.Groundspeak.com/GC/index.php...mp;qpid=3796582

 

Your cache came up because the description mentions being wrapped in a plastic bag.

 

happy caching - careygang

 

So perhaps they will join in the discussion/debate :D

 

I have disabled the cache and requested that the owner removes the plastic bag, you'll also notice I admitted that it slipping through was my mistake and apologised in that Disable Log.

 

Deceangi

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... As for Camo, I swear by Duck Tape - I have a roll of black and a roll of silver, and I have caches that are still as good as new after 3 years. The downside with paint (IMO) is the extra preparation and it can flake after a while.

 

Hope that helps!

 

We use some camo duct/duck* tape too, which came from USA. It's brilliant for caches in woody/brackeny/leafy places. I don't know whether you can get it in UK shops, but I've seen it on Ebay.

 

*Which is it? Or shall we not start that debate again?

 

We must be overdue for one of those 'bad grammar' topics too...

 

Don't ask me! I flipped a coin to see which way to spell it!

 

Anyway, both my rolls came from B&Q - may not be original branded, but just as good, and they do a reasonable range of colours. Bought the black one 3 years ago, used on almost every cache placement, and still got some left!

 

Good stuff!

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... As for Camo, I swear by Duck Tape - I have a roll of black and a roll of silver, and I have caches that are still as good as new after 3 years. The downside with paint (IMO) is the extra preparation and it can flake after a while.

 

Hope that helps!

 

We use some camo duct/duck* tape too, which came from USA. It's brilliant for caches in woody/brackeny/leafy places. I don't know whether you can get it in UK shops, but I've seen it on Ebay.

 

*Which is it? Or shall we not start that debate again?

 

We must be overdue for one of those 'bad grammar' topics too...

 

Don't ask me! I flipped a coin to see which way to spell it!

 

Anyway, both my rolls came from B&Q - may not be original branded, but just as good, and they do a reasonable range of colours. Bought the black one 3 years ago, used on almost every cache placement, and still got some left!

 

Good stuff!

 

MrsB knows the answer shes just stirring things

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... As for Camo, I swear by Duck Tape - I have a roll of black and a roll of silver, and I have caches that are still as good as new after 3 years. The downside with paint (IMO) is the extra preparation and it can flake after a while.

 

Hope that helps!

 

We use some camo duct/duck* tape too, which came from USA. It's brilliant for caches in woody/brackeny/leafy places. I don't know whether you can get it in UK shops, but I've seen it on Ebay.

 

MrsB

 

*Which is it? Or shall we not start that debate again?

 

We must be overdue for one of those 'bad grammar' topics too...

 

Well to quote a generally accepted on-line reference...

"...duct tape was originally developed during World War II in 1942 as a water resistant sealing tape for ammunition cases... (It) used a rubber-based adhesive to help the tape resist water and a fabric backing to add strength. It was also used to repair military equipment quickly, including jeeps, firearms, and aircraft because of these properties....The British armed forces refer to it as "bodge tape" because it is often used to effect temporary bodges in lieu of subsequent proper repairs."

I can vouch for the final sentence from personal experience.

But back on topic, Cammo Bodge/Duct tape is available from UK outdoor sports suppliers and camping shops, though a bit hit and miss...

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The British armed forces refer to it as "bodge tape" because it is often used to effect temporary bodges in lieu of subsequent proper repairs."

I can vouch for the final sentence from personal experience.

But back on topic, Cammo Bodge/Duct tape is available from UK outdoor sports suppliers and camping shops, though a bit hit and miss...

13 years in the army and I never once heard it being called 'bodge tape', but we did call it 'Black Nasty' and it did repair nearly anything that needed a quick fix in the field.

 

I've also just read the reference you got your quote from. I have came to the conclusion that I must have led a sheltered life during my service!! <_<

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