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Lame LPCs? How about Lame YPCs!


Shuckymomo
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If you live in Vegas, or any other desert region that has Yucca Plants, I'm sure these tend to get old REAL quick!

 

You're walking out to a hide in the desert and where does it lead you? To a friggin Yucca Plant!

 

I got to finding so many caches hidden in Yucca Plants that I started thinking about how hated LPCs are...

 

I mean, c'mon, make the cache a fake rock NEXT to the yucca plant. Be original! Geeeeez....

 

:)

 

With as many tin cans there are out in the desert, make a cache out of those. I am! But, here in CA!

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If you live in Vegas, or any other desert region that has Yucca Plants, I'm sure these tend to get old REAL quick!

 

You're walking out to a hide in the desert and where does it lead you? To a friggin Yucca Plant!

 

Yeah, know what you mean. Here I am walking a trail on a tree farm and looking for a cache. Jeez, another ammo can in a stump :huh: Going on to the next one, Oh, no another ammo can under the ferns :) Can't anyone hide one under a log? :shocked:

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Sounds about as much fun as caches in spruce/pine trees. Nothing like having to paw through the dense branches of one of those.

 

I'm sure different regions have different "Oh no, not another one of THOSE!" caches.

 

In NJ it is rock crevices. Though you might find 50 rock crevices within 30 feet of the cache that are possibilities so it rarely gets old.

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Have no idea what a yucca plant is

 

Yeah, and I'm sure no one in Arizona knows who the Green Riders are. :)

 

I agree with Grate Bear from Idaho (and I'm like 2,000 miles away) about the Pine/Spruce trees. Not that anyone in their right mind can tell them apart. I just go with the term Conifers.

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The worst here in Central TX is the cypress tree, an evergreen w tiny tiny spikes running along all the branches and occasionally if you touch the wood a very long 1 inch splinter will stab you and you'll have to pull it out. I come out of one of those feeling like Ive been wrestling a porcupine :)

Edited by Opalblade
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I love bisons in evergreens I don't know what every buddy's haten them, although i do hate those micros that are the size of a button. takes forever to get the log out!

I've had less problem with bisons in evergreens since I got a wand type metal detector. Part of it is thanks to Murphy's Law. I haven't encountered them since getting the wand.

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I know what yukka plants are - Over here you can buy them from the Garden Centre, about £5 for a small one to sit on your windowsill up to £50 for a huge one to plant in your garden. :)

There's one just across the road from me but I wouldn't be tempted to hide a cache under one - Too spiky!

 

I was puzzled about the OP's comment about lots of tin cans in the desert... why's that?

 

MrsB (in dull, drizzly, wintery Wales)

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Sounds about as much fun as caches in spruce/pine trees. Nothing like having to paw through the dense branches of one of those.

 

I'm sure different regions have different "Oh no, not another one of THOSE!" caches.

 

There was even a thread awhile back that was a "Oh no, not another ________" (fill in the blank)

 

One of the more common responses was "tank".

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In Florida its "Sabal Palm" trees, a pill bottle or film can stuck in one of the dead branch notches that go all the way around, top to bottom on the trunk.
There is no way to search thru a sabal except to stuff your fingers down into each branch one at a time... and not saying not to hide any of them there, but just tossing a film canister in one has been coined in descriptions as "typical Florida hide".... ::yawn::
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I know what yukka plants are - Over here you can buy them from the Garden Centre, about £5 for a small one to sit on your windowsill up to £50 for a huge one to plant in your garden. :D

There's one just across the road from me but I wouldn't be tempted to hide a cache under one - Too spiky!

 

I was puzzled about the OP's comment about lots of tin cans in the desert... why's that?

 

MrsB (in dull, drizzly, wintery Wales)

 

Geeez, I love getting notifications of replies! :)B):blink: Yes, that is sarcasm!

 

Stop on almost any rural road in the desert and walk into the desert. You will almost undoubtely run into piles of tin cans. Tin was used before aluminum for soda cans. So, the ones you find are rusted and at least 30 years old.

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I love bisons in evergreens I don't know what every buddy's haten them, although i do hate those micros that are the size of a button. takes forever to get the log out!
Joined: 11-January 09 That may be why you don't understand why everybody hates them. Give it time, my friend. :)

A suba tank in an ever green will always be 100 times more fun than a 35mm film can under a LPS B)

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If you live in Vegas, or any other desert region that has Yucca Plants, I'm sure these tend to get old REAL quick!

 

You're walking out to a hide in the desert and where does it lead you? To a friggin Yucca Plant!

 

I got to finding so many caches hidden in Yucca Plants that I started thinking about how hated LPCs are...

 

I mean, c'mon, make the cache a fake rock NEXT to the yucca plant. Be original! Geeeeez....

 

:)

 

With as many tin cans there are out in the desert, make a cache out of those. I am! But, here in CA!

10-4 to that, how about Joshua Trees ... ouch, ouch, ouch

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I'm sure different regions have different "Oh no, not another one of THOSE!" caches.

 

In Florida its "Sabal Palm" trees, a pill bottle or film can stuck in one of the dead branch notches that go all the way around, top to bottom on the trunk.

 

You are so not kidding. One of the recent caches I went after was a parking lot that had 8 sable palms less than 20' apart. I spent maybe 3 minutes looking and said forget this!!!

Edited by BOA3532
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If you live in Vegas, or any other desert region that has Yucca Plants, I'm sure these tend to get old REAL quick!

 

You're walking out to a hide in the desert and where does it lead you? To a friggin Yucca Plant!

 

I got to finding so many caches hidden in Yucca Plants that I started thinking about how hated LPCs are...

 

I mean, c'mon, make the cache a fake rock NEXT to the yucca plant. Be original! Geeeeez....

 

:)

 

With as many tin cans there are out in the desert, make a cache out of those. I am! But, here in CA!

10-4 to that, how about Joshua Trees ... ouch, ouch, ouch

 

Or cholla. B)

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With as many tin cans there are out in the desert, make a cache out of those.

Sheesh... and here I thought CITO was actually part of geocaching.

 

But, I do know the differences between pine and spruce, and fir and hemlock... we got lots of those, but no yuccas or lamp posts for that matter! B):)

 

Ask some of the San Diego cachers about tin cans out in the Anza Borrego Desert State Park

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If you live in Vegas, or any other desert region that has Yucca Plants, I'm sure these tend to get old REAL quick!

 

You're walking out to a hide in the desert and where does it lead you? To a friggin Yucca Plant!

 

I got to finding so many caches hidden in Yucca Plants that I started thinking about how hated LPCs are...

 

I mean, c'mon, make the cache a fake rock NEXT to the yucca plant. Be original! Geeeeez....

 

:)

 

With as many tin cans there are out in the desert, make a cache out of those. I am! But, here in CA!

 

I feel the same way about micros in evergreens, blackberry bushes, ivy, and holly bushes.

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I'm allergic to evergreen bushes and trees, like pine and cedar/juniper. We have tons of it around here, it seems. It a very good place to hide caches, I'll admit. But when I'm looking through a juniper, I immediately start getting itchy, no matter how careful I am, and the ones that are prickly leave me with a rash. And if you don't wipe or wash your hands right after, it can get all over face when you rub it or touch it. :)

 

In the early days of caching, when there were more places to hide caches (they didn't always have be hidden in that stuff), I had a friend who made the habiit of hiding his caches in juniper bushes. I always got on his case about how he was messing with my allergies. :D Then one day, I finally hid a cache in a juniper, because it was the best option at that site. Oh, boy, you can bet that he gave me heck on that one. B):blink:

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Here in Oregon we have LPCs, Evergreen Caches, and Guardrail Caches I would say are some of the most common. (I admit I even own a couple of guard rail caches... but they are because the area is interesting).

 

We own a couple guard rail caches. Ironically, we get some of the best comments on those caches, because they were placed for the view/interesting info. :)

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Here in Oregon we have LPCs, Evergreen Caches, and Guardrail Caches I would say are some of the most common. (I admit I even own a couple of guard rail caches... but they are because the area is interesting).

 

We own a couple guard rail caches. Ironically, we get some of the best comments on those caches, because they were placed for the view/interesting info. :)

 

That's great! I love it. There's one guard rail cache that we have placed in a little tiny town called Cheshire, OR and the guard rail really was the best place to put it there. We put it there because it is in front of a beautiful old water tank, and right across the street from the ONE store in town. We joked that we were "promoting tourism." People write comments often about how good the ice cream is at the store there B)

 

Kind of fun.

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Or cholla. :)

 

Only a real sadist would hide a cache in cholla. There is lots of it

growing around here, and thus far I have never found a cache

in one, thank heaven.

 

sometimes people will hide them here "near the prickly pears"... and you go to GZ and it is a minefield of the cactus plants. there's a cache semi-close to my home that has a bunch of DNFs since last year as the cactus finally overtook the little crevice where the owner slipped his cache...

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Or cholla. :)

 

Only a real sadist would hide a cache in cholla. There is lots of it

growing around here, and thus far I have never found a cache

in one, thank heaven.

 

Seriously that's just cruel. I'll never whine about pfitzer bush or Arborvitae caches again... B)

Lol, I've only found one at the base of a larger cholla, it wasn't too bad, fortunately. :blink: I was waiting for the thing to jump on me, but it didn't. :D

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Or cholla. :)

 

Only a real sadist would hide a cache in cholla. There is lots of it

growing around here, and thus far I have never found a cache

in one, thank heaven.

Without a doubt chollas are the worst. For those of you who dont know a cholla is also called a jumping cactus, because it seems like they do. Dont wear tennis shoes into a cholla forest, trust me.

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Here in Oregon we have LPCs, Evergreen Caches, and Guardrail Caches I would say are some of the most common. (I admit I even own a couple of guard rail caches... but they are because the area is interesting).

 

We own a couple guard rail caches. Ironically, we get some of the best comments on those caches, because they were placed for the view/interesting info. B)

 

That's great! I love it. There's one guard rail cache that we have placed in a little tiny town called Cheshire, OR and the guard rail really was the best place to put it there. We put it there because it is in front of a beautiful old water tank, and right across the street from the ONE store in town. We joked that we were "promoting tourism." People write comments often about how good the ice cream is at the store there :blink:

 

Kind of fun.

Cool! :D

 

Well, I place caches to bring someone to a certain spot. I'll look around for the best place to put a cache that is near that spot, and if if it's a guardrail, then so be it. :)

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With as many tin cans there are out in the desert, make a cache out of those.

Sheesh... and here I thought CITO was actually part of geocaching.

 

But, I do know the differences between pine and spruce, and fir and hemlock... we got lots of those, but no yuccas or lamp posts for that matter! B):)

 

Ask some of the San Diego cachers about tin cans out in the Anza Borrego Desert State Park

I suppose these are considered protected archeological artifacts.

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Here in Oregon we have LPCs, Evergreen Caches, and Guardrail Caches I would say are some of the most common. (I admit I even own a couple of guard rail caches... but they are because the area is interesting).

 

We own a couple guard rail caches. Ironically, we get some of the best comments on those caches, because they were placed for the view/interesting info. B)

 

That's great! I love it. There's one guard rail cache that we have placed in a little tiny town called Cheshire, OR and the guard rail really was the best place to put it there. We put it there because it is in front of a beautiful old water tank, and right across the street from the ONE store in town. We joked that we were "promoting tourism." People write comments often about how good the ice cream is at the store there :blink:

 

Kind of fun.

Cool! :D

 

Well, I place caches to bring someone to a certain spot. I'll look around for the best place to put a cache that is near that spot, and if if it's a guardrail, then so be it. :)

 

If they were all placed with that care I probably wouldn't exclude micros from most of my PQs.

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I'm allergic to evergreen bushes and trees, like pine and cedar/juniper. We have tons of it around here, it seems. It a very good place to hide caches, I'll admit. But when I'm looking through a juniper, I immediately start getting itchy, no matter how careful I am, and the ones that are prickly leave me with a rash. And if you don't wipe or wash your hands right after, it can get all over face when you rub it or touch it. :)

 

In the early days of caching, when there were more places to hide caches (they didn't always have be hidden in that stuff), I had a friend who made the habiit of hiding his caches in juniper bushes. I always got on his case about how he was messing with my allergies. :D Then one day, I finally hid a cache in a juniper, because it was the best option at that site. Oh, boy, you can bet that he gave me heck on that one. B):blink:

 

I have the same problem with juniper bushes. If I can't spot the cache by eyesight before I grab it, I'll just walk away. I can do without the itching/rash for the rest of the day.

Edited by Chumpo
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No matter what the temperature, if I cannot spot the cache in the juniper/holly/arborvitae within the first minute or three, I put my kevlar pat down gloves on. It's much more comfortable albeit a bit warmer.

 

Today I discovered that orange juice is much better than water at cleaning a swipe of sap off a forearm before heading into work after finding a cache or two on the way in. :)

(OK so I also stopped for a bojangles biscuit too.)

Edited by wimseyguy
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With as many tin cans there are out in the desert, make a cache out of those.

Sheesh... and here I thought CITO was actually part of geocaching.

 

But, I do know the differences between pine and spruce, and fir and hemlock... we got lots of those, but no yuccas or lamp posts for that matter! :P:)

 

Ask some of the San Diego cachers about tin cans out in the Anza Borrego Desert State Park

I suppose these are considered protected archeological artifacts.

 

Yeah go figure ??????

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I'm sure different regions have different "Oh no, not another one of THOSE!" caches.

 

In Florida its "Sabal Palm" trees, a pill bottle or film can stuck in one of the dead branch notches that go all the way around, top to bottom on the trunk.

 

yet another thread tonight that has me chuckling. (perhaps I just have the giggles)

 

anyhow moparots, I was about to post the same response.

palms, palms, palms.

I was at a cache last week and guess where the friggin film canister was hidden?! I mean I assume it was a film canister.....that is what I have seen and I assume it's because they fit in the branch notches so well (least the handful I have gone after)..... I don't actually know because I refused to go in after it. Hiders need to remember that as palms in the wild lose leaves/branches they just die and hang there. They do not fall to the ground usually for some time. This is what happens without a nice tree trimming guy to come and pretty it all up..... and then eventually there is a many month layer of dead, dry, stacked palm leaves waiting until they finally fall off. But the real hazard is that wasps LOVE to nest in those babies when they get like that.

121x54m.jpg

this isn't a Sabal Palm, but its gives you an idea of what palms look like in the wild as the leaves pile up. I thought I should post a picture for anyone who isn't familiar with what I am talking about. Sabals are a bit shorter and stalkier.

1zvqt5j.jpg

and here is a huge yellow jacket nest under the branches of a palm. This nest is pretty exposed but you can understand what I am getting at..... once the leaves pile up the nest becomes hidden and you wouldn't even know they were there...... well, until you started rustling around for a cache that is.

Other types of wasps like to just build multiple cone nests all within and under the dead leaves.

15zhzlz.jpg

and this has nothing to do with anything except that when you google for images of wasps on sabal palms he comes up as a result. Don't ask me, ask google.

 

So anyhow, the cache in that particular palm I was talking about that I didn't bother going after.....

I was looking at the tree and I bent down and looked up into the dead leaf folds and sure enough, HUGE wasps nests.

Take it as a public service warning: when hunting caches in the south hidden in palm trees with many dead branches PLEASE BE CAREFUL>

 

edited to add.

Edited by FiveDollarGuitar
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