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Fence Post Caches


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To everyone who made a fence post cache, were the caps loose already or did you need to wiggle it a little bit to get it off so you could make the hole hide-y?

 

what?

 

I gues and also I'll add another of the w's... why? I go fetal without context :P

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To everyone who made a fence post cache, were the caps loose already or did you need to wiggle it a little bit to get it off so you could make the hole hide-y?

 

what?

 

I gues and also I'll add another of the w's... why? I go fetal without context :P

 

Seemed to me to have perfect context. Guess you never done one of those.

 

For the OP, I've never made a hide like that, but my guess is that the cap was loose otherwise it would get stuck and be a, ah, difficult to remove for the next person. All of the ones I have done have been loose. The thing I always wondered was how did they find them in the first place. Seems like a lot of work to me.

 

Jim

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I haven't done one yet, but the places I'd read about it at sugest finding a missing cap and replacing it with your own custom made cap. Of course, they were selling the caps with the film canister already glued in...

 

I think the tops cost less then 5$ at a hardware supply store.

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To everyone who made a fence post cache, were the caps loose already or did you need to wiggle it a little bit to get it off so you could make the hole hide-y?

 

what?

 

I gues and also I'll add another of the w's... why? I go fetal without context :P

 

Seemed to me to have perfect context. Guess you never done one of those.

 

For the OP, I've never made a hide like that, but my guess is that the cap was loose otherwise it would get stuck and be a, ah, difficult to remove for the next person. All of the ones I have done have been loose. The thing I always wondered was how did they find them in the first place. Seems like a lot of work to me.

 

Jim

 

sorry! just not a thing up where I live and I didn't get it :D

 

apologies for the, what seems to me now, rude posts. I haven't been at this for long and I never done one of these I guess.

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To everyone who made a fence post cache, were the caps loose already or did you need to wiggle it a little bit to get it off so you could make the hole hide-y?

 

what?

 

I gues and also I'll add another of the w's... why? I go fetal without context :P

 

Ahhh, such sweet, blissful innocence!

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To everyone who made a fence post cache, were the caps loose already or did you need to wiggle it a little bit to get it off so you could make the hole hide-y?

 

what?

 

I gues and also I'll add another of the w's... why? I go fetal without context :P

 

Seemed to me to have perfect context. Guess you never done one of those.

 

For the OP, I've never made a hide like that, but my guess is that the cap was loose otherwise it would get stuck and be a, ah, difficult to remove for the next person. All of the ones I have done have been loose. The thing I always wondered was how did they find them in the first place. Seems like a lot of work to me.

 

Jim

 

The first cache I ever placed is like this. It's a small park across the road from where I live. There is a chain linked fence surrounding three sides of the park. There are two fence post caps that are not like the others and both of them were loose. Anyone with a bit of experience would find it right away but it's also a good beginners cache as it demonstrates that there is more to geocaching than tupperware/ammo cans in the woods or hide-a-keys on a guard rail, yet it's an easy find as there are few possible hiding places. Hopefully it will inspire new cachers to use a little imagination when placing their first cache.

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In the UK along the by passes, there are marker posts to tell the emergency services where you are in the event they are needed.

 

Each one has a lid in the top that can be maid lose with your fingernail, removed, plastic bag inserted, then cache dropped in and lid replaced.

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To everyone who made a fence post cache, were the caps loose already or did you need to wiggle it a little bit to get it off so you could make the hole hide-y?

I have had a couple...

 

Honestly, I look for the missing caps...go the hardware store and buy a new one and alter the one I bought...

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Gluing a film can to the inside of the cap? Oy, once the glue fails (and it will fail), the film can drops out of reach.

 

I've seen magnetic micros clamped to the inside of the (metal) post. That sounds like the most durable approach. (Unless it's a dollar-store key holder, with even worse glue on the magnet; I can't imagine anybody trusting a $100 key to those pieces of junk...)

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Whenever I come across a loose fence cap, I think about these type of hides. There is one between where I work and the bus stop, and I generally turn it just a bit when I am walking by. I am sure that most of the fence post caches were loose and some of them or otherwise open and the cache owner got a cap that fit. But a friend of mine placed one in a fence post at the top of a very steep climb, a couple of hundred feet or more. So it was in an isolated area. He told me that two or three people spent quite a bit of time hammering away (gently I presume) to get it loose. However, I would not recommend defacing or changing existing structures.

Edited by Erickson
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Gluing a film can to the inside of the cap? Oy, once the glue fails (and it will fail), the film can drops out of reach.

 

I've seen magnetic micros clamped to the inside of the (metal) post. That sounds like the most durable approach. (Unless it's a dollar-store key holder, with even worse glue on the magnet; I can't imagine anybody trusting a $100 key to those pieces of junk...)

Actually...no...

.

.

.

Course saying this will give away what to look for with my post caches...but...

.

.

.

I use a small stove bolt to secure a bison tube to the inside of the cap...

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:P

I have a couple of this type of cache, one gives the information needed to project a coarse to the final cache, the other is a small cache (log book, pencil, small trade goods) The caps when new are tapped on to the post, the caps have 3-4 ridges on the inside which grip the post as the cap is installed, Some of these will twist off (a strong wrist / arm) others will take a bit of tapping! Once off, I grind / sand the ridges down smooth with the I.D. of the cap.......good to go, also I've bonded bolts to the insiide of the caps to attach containers :D

CAPCache.jpg

NOTE: I stuff a wad of newspaper down the post / pipe, before installing the cache / Cap........if the adhesive fails (which I've had happen) you don't lose the container

Edited by GIDEON-X
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Wow :P I obviously didn't know that they were so prevalent but it seems like a neat idea -- especially would be neat in my local area where we don't have any like this :D Perhaps in Santa Fe but I haven't really cleared that out yet.. Thanks for the ideas and sorry for my initial confusion in the thread... Happy caching!

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I haven't done one yet, but the places I'd read about it at sugest finding a missing cap and replacing it with your own custom made cap. Of course, they were selling the caps with the film canister already glued in...

 

I think the tops cost less then 5$ at a hardware supply store.

 

Yes. That's what I did. The cap was missing, so I bought one, and put it in place.

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I haven't done one yet, but the places I'd read about it at sugest finding a missing cap and replacing it with your own custom made cap. Of course, they were selling the caps with the film canister already glued in...

 

I think the tops cost less then 5$ at a hardware supply store.

 

Yes. That's what I did. The cap was missing, so I bought one, and put it in place.

 

A quick giveaway if the cache is fairly new, those new caps stick out like a sore

thumb usually :D

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:D

NOTE: I stuff a wad of newspaper down the post / pipe, before installing the cache / Cap........if the adhesive fails (which I've had happen) you don't lose the container[/b]

 

The quote is a really good idea. As I've looked for one of this type that has gone down the pole twice now and needs replacement yet again.

 

I've found several of this type of hide. In one case it was a film canister clued into the inside of the cap. This one was not in good condision and needed recluing. I emailed the owner and made a suggestion about using epoxy glue.

 

That's the second type of this cache I've seen - epoxy glue used to clue a hook-eye in the inside of the cap. The log container is then attached to the hook-eye with a wire of small chain.

 

In fact, I just a half hour ago needed an inch or so of Mighty Putty (as seen on TV) and pushed it into a fence pole cap. The "hook" part is some heavy plastic coated wire I twisted togeather for strength and made into a loop to hold the wire/chain that will be attached to the log container.

 

As for the cap, I bought a new one and "aged" it by letting it stay outside for two months after using a little fine grit sand paper on it to get off the "new" shine and so that natural "stuff" would collect on it and it would oxidize. Another trick I have used on containers before is to use a matte finish clear coat spray paint, spray on the container and than toss a bit of dirt and whatever in it's general direction. The clear coat makes the container sticky for just long enough to have dust and whatever stick to it.

As if, it has been out in the weather for some time.

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Another thing that works well is to find a weather cap you like and replace it with your new cap. then use the old one for your hide.

pappy jaypee did one in a restaurant in Florida this winter quit a job tring not to be seen by the cliantel,

the cach is in side a caped drain pipe. :rolleyes:

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It just occurred to me that the larger posts (4" x 4" PVC posts for example) are large enough to hold a rather long piece of PVC pipe under the cap. Hmmmmmm...

 

Maybe a 'regular' size fence post cache is in order for my first hide... Now just where oh where. . .

 

BTW: newspaper stuffed down the post to secure items sounds like a great idea...

Edited by andynshe
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It just occurred to me that the larger posts (4" x 4" PVC posts for example) are large enough to hold a rather long piece of PVC pipe under the cap. Hmmmmmm...

 

Maybe a 'regular' size fence post cache is in order for my first hide... Now just where oh where. . .

 

BTW: newspaper stuffed down the post to secure items sounds like a great idea...

 

lol, that's exactly why I asked about them!

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The one I hid was loose already. I drilled 2 tiny holes, looped a really fine wire through them, and hung a bison tube at the end of the wire. Unless you specifically know what to look for you can't see the wire/holes and if you run your hand across it it just feels like a slight flaw in the cap. It's been out for 7 months with no problems at all.

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I used a fence cap at the starting point of my first cache GC19NZT to hold a laminated set of instructions for the puzzle. I figured it would help those who did not bring the cache page info to try it out! I figured it would be a pretty obvious pace to look if all you had were the coordinates. It is connected with a Nd magnet so you could take it with you while doing the puzzle. Worked out pretty good, I'll say.

 

Edit HTML doofage...

Edited by holazola
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The ones I've seen have either been secured with a hole drilled into the fence cap, and a wire put through it to a nut on the outside (obvious only if you are looking for it) or better yet, what looks like "Liquid Weld" which is a really good epoxy that works on metal, plastic and many other materials.

 

I found one that stumped me for a moment because the cap was on tight. A motorist drove up to a screeching halt in the middle of the street, blocking traffic and asked if I was geocaching. I said yes. He said, do you want a hint? He pointed out the one cap was different than the others. I had tried it already, so was glad to learn you had to really yank on this one!!

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Better yet, measure the height of the entire tube, put in a PVC pipe (clearly marked geocache) and make it as long as possible - the fun is putting it where you can watch and then watch cachers try to get it out of the fence.. lol

 

We've got one.. a "few feet" long

 

Then there is no epoxy - you take the end cap that screws off, drill that with a bolt to the top.. :P

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Better yet, measure the height of the entire tube, put in a PVC pipe (clearly marked geocache) and make it as long as possible - the fun is putting it where you can watch and then watch cachers try to get it out of the fence.. lol

 

That is a hilarious idea!

ROFL at the thought... I'm in, planning my next hide.

 

I can see it now, the look on the poor cachers face as he lifts and pulls, and pulls, and pulls, like some bad magicians trick...

 

That'll learn 'em

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Better yet, measure the height of the entire tube, put in a PVC pipe (clearly marked geocache) and make it as long as possible - the fun is putting it where you can watch and then watch cachers try to get it out of the fence.. lol

 

That is a hilarious idea!

Oh...I may have to get something like that in place for the next knowschad geocaching/mushroom pickin' road trip :)

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Better yet, measure the height of the entire tube, put in a PVC pipe (clearly marked geocache) and make it as long as possible - the fun is putting it where you can watch and then watch cachers try to get it out of the fence.. lol

I've seen a variation on this theme which I think is also worthy of merit: A regular "fence post-sized" cache with a "leash" on it which is long enough to lower the cache to the bottom of the post. A good leash material seems to be that plastic banding material you see holding boxes to pallets. It's stiff enough to stand up in the post and time/weather doesn't seem to affect it.

 

Pete

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:laughing:

I have a couple of this type of cache, one gives the information needed to project a coarse to the final cache, the other is a small cache (log book, pencil, small trade goods) The caps when new are tapped on to the post, the caps have 3-4 ridges on the inside which grip the post as the cap is installed, Some of these will twist off (a strong wrist / arm) others will take a bit of tapping! Once off, I grind / sand the ridges down smooth with the I.D. of the cap.......good to go, also I've bonded bolts to the insiide of the caps to attach containers :D

CAPCache.jpg

NOTE: I stuff a wad of newspaper down the post / pipe, before installing the cache / Cap........if the adhesive fails (which I've had happen) you don't lose the container

 

Good thought!

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I've always found loose ones.......I like to wedge cardboard or wood inside the hollow post and simply sit the cache on top ( sometime not quite visible from the ground ;) )

 

 

Thanks for that tip BAMBOOZLE. My son recently told me that he wants to hide a cache on a steel fencepost and name it after a superhero. Your technique will work perfectly.

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I'm currently placing one of these soon (in review) and the cap was loose already. I received permission for the Parks director but the reviewer is saying I am taking the fence apart. I am not altering anything and the cache is attached with wire run through an existing hole. 

I hope it gets published!

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12 minutes ago, KKS74 said:

I'm currently placing one of these soon (in review) and the cap was loose already. I received permission for the Parks director but the reviewer is saying I am taking the fence apart. I am not altering anything and the cache is attached with wire run through an existing hole. 

I hope it gets published!

You gave a good response to the reviewer and I expect once your reviewer reads that, your cache will be published.

 

Contrast your situation (hidden with permission, and in a way that doesn't permanently alter the fence post) with some of the other designs earlier in this thread (like welding something to the fence post cap).  It's because of complaints from land managers about "vandalism" to their property that reviewers will often ask for more details.  You had the right answers.

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2 hours ago, Keystone said:

Contrast your situation (hidden with permission, and in a way that doesn't permanently alter the fence post) with some of the other designs earlier in this thread (like welding something to the fence post cap).  It's because of complaints from land managers about "vandalism" to their property that reviewers will often ask for more details.  You had the right answers.

Huh... The FPCs that I've found have generally used a fence post cap that was visibly different from the other fence post caps on the fence. It seems to me that most FPCs use a fence post cap provided by the CO, not an existing one that has been vandalized. But I haven't exactly conducted a scientific study on the subject, so I could be wrong.

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32 minutes ago, niraD said:

Huh... The FPCs that I've found have generally used a fence post cap that was visibly different from the other fence post caps on the fence. It seems to me that most FPCs use a fence post cap provided by the CO, not an existing one that has been vandalized. But I haven't exactly conducted a scientific study on the subject, so I could be wrong.

 

That's odd, most we've found looked to be the original (style,color, not new...), with a noticeable ring and scrapes where it was pried off and a micro attached.  Go figure...    Most  looked like putty/weld with a bison in it, a nut to secure and a wire attached/dropped down. 

We haven't done attached to private property caches for some time, thinking I'd be the one that someone finally noticed and get blamed for it.  :)

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2 hours ago, joesdolphins said:

I have 1 or 2 fence cap hides. When walking the dog in the park I said there’s room for a cache here let’s see if that cap is loose. Yep so came back the next day to hide.

How did you modify the fence cap or post to place the caches?

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