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Stop the Whoring of Geocaching!!!!


Squealy
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I love Geocaching! Let me start with that. I am totally addicted.

 

However, I think that it should continue to spread by word of mouth not by the media. People who participate in articles by the media only help to create the off-shoot of Geocaching.com - Geocrashing.com (Thanks NancyCz for the phrase).

 

It is simply a matter of time till others think it is cool to find caches and eliminate them. I 100% believe in letting others know about our hobby and involve "muggles" in it, I am just not sure media articles and their slants are the best way to go...

 

What do you think? Please post your responses - I'd love to hear them -

 

-Squealy

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As a former journalist, my thoughts are: Yes the media may distort geocaching (and therefore create a geomugglemonster), but it is never constructive to argue with a newspaper/TV/radio station.

 

"Never declare war on a man who buys his ink by the gallon."--Jolly B Good

 

The media is always going to be there, so the most positive thing that can be done is to "cooperate" and to tell the story as truely as possible and to "guide" the media the way you desire.

 

Once again:"Never declare war on a man who buys his ink by the gallon."--Jolly B Good

 

==============="If it feels good...do it"================

 

**(the other 9 out of 10 voices in my head say: "Don't do it.")**

 

.

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If it weren't for the media, I would have no idea Geocaching ever existed and I doubt I ever would've.

 

There are some inherent problems with the media being biased towards making sensationalist assertions in order to keep a Geocaching story "lively", that's for dadgum sure. And that can create a negative stereotype in some instances. But like every single thing in this world, you have to take the good with the bad.

 

I'm glad the media lets others know about it because after a stale period an article comes out and then there's more caches to find and cachers to find mine. icon_wink.gif

 

Team Kender - "The Sun is coming up!" "No, the horizon is going down."

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I agree for the most part.

 

Having the media coverage means more good cachers and more caches to find, and more business for Groundspeak (which is a Good Thing).

 

The problem with it is that it's indiscriminate in who it's reaching. There's no control over who sees the article/report and thus, no quality control over who discovers the sport and decides to enjoy it - however they see fit. I'm not talking about McToys, here, either. As more people find out about it from sources which just blast their stories out for everyone to see/hear, and as GPSrs become cheaper and more mainstream, there's going to be more theft/plundering/general geo-nastiness.

 

There's going to be a balancing point reached with the number of people involved on one side and the sport no longer being enjoyable (or even viable) on the other. Once we reach that critical mass of people, things are going to start going the other way.

 

We've already started to see (or at least I've noticed) more missing/plundered caches being posted about in the forums. I don't see the problem getting any better as time goes on.

 

The only solution will be for people to make more and more caches members-only. This probably won't be necessary in the more rural areas, but in the cities, I think it will be.

 

Word of mouth is the best advertising, for a lot of reasons. In this case, it's particularly good because cachers are generally only going to tell people they know and trust to not screw around.

 

--

Pehmva!

 

Random quote:

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quote:
Originally posted by Squealy:

What do you think? Please post your responses - I'd love to hear them -

-Squealy


 

OK, so how is Geocaching getting "whored out"? Maybe once we start seeing pop-up ads in here like "Gatorade-the official soft drink of Geocachers everywhere", then, yes, I would tend to agree with the title of this thread.

Perhaps a better title would have been:

"Stop the Media slanting of Geocaching", or something along those lines.

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I definitely agree. I don't think the post was referring to GeoCaching being at fault or commercializing itself... I think it's simply a matter of safety and ownership. No one wants their favorite place to hang out to be destroyed or even tampered with. For GeoCachers, our stomping grounds are wherever we feel like heading -- in the past 10 days I've cached in northern vermont, southern vermont, mass, nyc, and long island -- and each of those places was unique and beautiful and a new experience that I really enjoyed. I take my caching seriously and I hate hearing about caches getting plundered.

 

I found out about geocaching from a friend. I introduced three people to it. One of those people has introduced others. I definitely wouldn't tell some random man in the park what I was doing... and while I support GeoCaching getting as many players as possible, I do have to say that all the newspaper articles raise my hackles.

 

Kids are bored these days. And what kid WOULDN'T get curious about a random container in the woods with a note on it about how it's a game piece, etc.? But I think it's better left that once in a while someone stumbles upon a cache. The articles I've seen done are really wonderful pieces that capture the spirit of the game, but I know when my students heard a colleague of mine and I talking about geocaching they were like, "I'm going to find out where those things are and steal them." And that's typical teenage behavior... it's NORMAL and to be expected... and so we have to take certain precautions.

 

Word of mouth is the greatest advertisement we have. It's an awesome activity and it's catching (I'll save the pun, but do know it was tough to pass it up!). Keep caching, keep placing, keep telling and taking your friends... but understand that when too much word gets out there, GeoCrashing.com isn't too far behind.

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I learned about geocaching from a newspaper article, as did many others here. Being that this sport is gaining popularity, the media will be drawn to it. If we geocachers don't participate by granting interviews, taking reporters out on hunts and stressing the positives of the sport, the only voices that will be heard are the naysayers.

 

quote:
It is simply a matter of time till others think it is cool to find caches and eliminate them.

 

It's not a matter of time. Its been going on since the sport began. Of course more exposure will bring out more of these miscreants, but additional exposure will also bring out more participants, which means more caches to find and more people to find our caches. Without new blood, the sport would certainly die.

 

"Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, he'll sit in a boat and drink beer all day" - Dave Barry

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For every thing that is done, there will be those who like it, and those who do not (and at different degrees of liking and disliking).

 

If you are part of either group, and you care about the image of your side, then you can use the media to your advantage. Either side can create their own media...whether by net or by magazine, or by some kind of organised system where articles or leaflets are spread out at regulated and controlled times and places...

 

...then there is the difference between INFORMING the public, and IMPOSING information on the public.

 

Just some thoughts.

 

Can stopping the whoring be entirely possible, or only minimized to some extent?

(non-rhetorical)

 

______________________________________________ Kanto

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Word-of-mouth is also indiscriminate in who it reaches. The person you are talking to at the office water cooler about your geocaching exploits could just as well be a cache plunderer should he have or obtain a GPSr.

 

In some ways, I think that limitation is one of the things that limit plundering. If you go through the expense of buying a GPS, you're not very likely to go out and vandalize caches. And people who stumble upon them without a GPS are not going to plunder them because they heard about it in the news. They will plunder them because they are jerks.

 

There is something called the wiki-web. This is a series of "open source websites" that allow anyone who visits the site to make changes. See the most-excelent http://www.wikipedia.com for example. The people who have set up these sites have discovered something wonderful; the vast majority of visitors add productive content to their sites and vandalism is rare. Humans are, for the most part, good people and will not cause damage simply because they can.

 

In the woods, there may be a slightly higher percentage of bored kids willing to cause trouble but, for the most part, people aren't going to plunder your cache. We simply hear more about plundered caches and not about those that were found and then left alone.

 

Think of it this way, of the 63,389 caches out there, how many haven't been plundered? For that matter, how many HAVE been plundered and what percentage of the total is that? We hear about more plundered caches on the discussion groups but how does the rate of increase in plundered caches compare to the rate of increase of caches overall?

 

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People are also inherently lazy and only motivate themselves to do what feels good. Plundering gets old fast and has limited rewards. However, with the rapid growth of the hobby, more an more post publicly and more frequently regarding problems. That'll continue. We'll know it's huge when there's one daily.

 

As for the media, no biggy. The local Hartford NBC affiliate did a segment recently and I haven't heard of any negative impact.

 

I think plundering comes more from caches that can be stumbled on readily--crimes of conveniance. Think of how many caches are infrequently visited and never plundered versus those that are! Plundering has more to do with placement than anything else in my experience. (Of local cachers, I place harder ones without plundering problems, another person places lotsa' easy ones with lotsa' plunders, and another places tons and tons more moderate ones with few issues.)

 

"C'est la vie" is something you can work around!

 

Randy

 

PS: I too believe in positive encouragement of the media to minimize negative slant and outright untruths--ironically, the reporters themselves sometimes get involved!

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They're going to write an article about geocaching regardless of whether you want them to or not. So the best approach is to give an honest interview.

 

Whoring is a bit extreme, isn't it? Usually the press is looking for a soft piece to stick in the news between the story of another dead soldier in Iraq and the trial of some evil person.

 

frog.gif Jeremy Irish

Groundspeak - The Language of Location

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The media has been reporting on geocaching for a couple of years. I have yet to hear of an area experiencing an upswing of cache plundering (please, not geocrashing - it's stupid, and the term "plunder" has already been long established in the GC world) due to a recent news report.

 

No one is going to go out and buy a GPS so they can plunder caches. Few kids have access to GPS units. It's just not a problem.

 

3608_2800.gif

"Don't mess with a geocacher. We know all the best places to hide a body."

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Wow - I didn't know that I was going to get such a response so quickly, thanks.

 

Is whoring too strong of a word? Possibly. This comment was not made in reference to Groundspeak either. I signed up for premium membership b/c I felt that it was to help keep the site going in other ways besides hunting and placing. As a matter of fact, I just bought a TShirt.

 

Perhaps maybe more of what I was getting at is the influx of new cachers who do not follow the rules and who draw attention to the sport.

 

Recently I found six caches that were hidden by digging, contained candy and some hidden in flower beds of a pretty popular park in NYC (not Central Park). The person hid about 12 and had never found one.

 

My concern is that these actions will lead to signs saying - Park Regulations: 1. No Dogs

2. No Alcoholic Beverages

3. No GeoCaching

 

it can happen. I was lucky enough to learn about my karate instructor from word of mouth - that is the only way to get into the class, if you come with someone already in. So when I was introduced to GeoCaching by word of mouth and saw the small community I hoped it would be much of the same.

 

As for the gentleman and his gallon of ink, don't roll over - buy your ink in 5 gallon containers.

 

For those of you who feel that it is a good idea to talk about it to the media - do it, just be careful of who you are telling your story to and who will see it.

 

Thanks for posting - some need to be less angry and go caching!

*yawn*

-Squealy

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Have you seen these signs posted?

No skateboarding! No bicycling! No dogs! No overnight camping! Soon to be No Geocaching!

There is always some idiot that ruin things for others no matter what the sport or hobby. It is my opinion that the sport of geocaching is in its golden years presently. Our sport will continue to be fun for maybe a year or two to come; then the slide will commence as more idiots and morons get GPS receivers and start geosmashing and geotrashing parks and open lands. It is a shame, but inevitable in my opinion. Perhaps I'm wrong and I dearly hope so. I can just imagine geoparties where a bunch of folks will hike in to a nice area containing a few geocaches; they will camp, party, hunt/find the caches, then depart the area leaving litter, trash, and trampled vegetation in their wake. I've seen this all too often on hike-in fishing trips; beer cans, Dorito's bags, used fishing line, cigarette butts, and......baby diapers full of "you know what" strewn about. (Sigh).

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Just as long as we take it easy, it should be alright. if it grows too fast, then we've got problems. Being a dog person, I look at various breeds as examples. Look what happened as the popularity of the Rottweiler took off. Now one of the most beautiful, loving, gentle, and loyal breeds has been turned into a "monster" with a few bad reports. On another note, look at the popularity of Dalmations after "101 Dalmations". How many of those people still have their dog(s)?

 

Just be careful.

 

~robert

Driver carries less than $20 cache.

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I pretty much agree with the sentiments expressed earlier. I've taken part in such an article (and the interview was reduced to one incoherent sentance too. icon_eek.gif) Anyway, as long as they interview experiences cachers, generally the articles tend to be positive, which IMHO counter balances those articles written by folks who DONT interview anyone and trash/smash us and the sport. Typically this would be someone who a wrongful impression of us, or who thinks wer're trashing the environment (the cavers come to mind here)

 

Cold it invite novices who will ruin things? perhaps. But thats no guarentee, and the positive impression is definately worthwhile. Besides there are new uses for GPS receivers every day so people are more & more likely to "git it" when we explain what it is that we do.

 

william

 

william

 

alt.gif

 

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quote:
Recently I found six caches that were hidden by digging, contained candy and some hidden in flower beds of a pretty popular park in NYC (not Central Park). The person hid about 12 and had never found one.


 

Issues like this should be addressed on a case by case basis. The first geocache was buried and so were several early ones, which is one of the reasons the National Park Service came down so hard on the sport from day one. We've learned alot since and this practice is now discouraged.

 

BTW, did you contact the owners of the caches in question? If you did and failed to receive a satisfactory response, did you request that the caches be archived?

 

Try to be part of the solution and take proactive measures to support and police the sport. We all must. It's part of our job as geocachers and an important part of our sales pitch when we're trying to sell the sport to land managers. And if someone asks you "who do you think you are? "The cache police?", say yes.

 

"Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, he'll sit in a boat and drink beer all day" - Dave Barry

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As many accurate and positive articles as there have been written about geocaching, I am probably just being paranoid, but I have a cautionary note:

 

As a media person myself, who is very careful of course would never, ever make a mistake icon_wink.gif I caution anyone who talks to newspapers, Radio stations, or TV about geocaching to be careful of what you say to the reporter; they sometimes misquote, make bad notes, and can pick up on something that you didn't intend to emphasize and run with that point and not the one you want to get across. so have a very good idea of what you want to tell them and stick to it.

 

If you are talking to a reporter, you are pretty much the PR person for the sport/hobby/game of geocaching, and just think of what you would want them to know about it that's good and positive, and stick with that. Ask to see a copy of the article before it comes out so you can correct any inaccuracies-- they may not do it, but it doesn't hurt to ask.

 

Not every journalist/reporter is as careful or as responsible as they should be in reporting a story, and it would suck if a badly-written or inaccurate article somehow trashed geocaching or gave people the wrong idea about what it is....

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quote:
Originally posted by mozartman:

I caution anyone who talks to newspapers, Radio stations, or TV about geocaching to be careful of what you say to the reporter; they sometimes misquote, make bad notes, and can pick up on something that you didn't intend to emphasize and run with that point and not the one you want to get across. so have a very good idea of what you want to tell them and stick to it.


 

I know at least two instances of people talking about being interviewed and focusing on environmental consciensiousness and the CITO aspects, with it not appearing in the final articles at all. So sometimes no matter what a person says, the article is just going to be slanted towards the "geeks tearing up the wilderness" or whatever.

 

Seems to me that in the past couple of years it has been reinforced that fear sells better than general interest.

 

Team Kender - "The Sun is coming up!" "No, the horizon is going down."

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I have only just scrathced the surface of this sport in the past week or so, but i wonder what will happen when the new generation cell phones roll out with GPS in them? I saw a proto type of one last week. I didnt have alot of time to play around with it, and didnt think to look and see what exactly it was capable of, but i can almost bet the service providers will be looking for new and exciting ways to make sure everyone pays their month GPS service charge.

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Originally posted by Prime Suspect:

(please, _not_ geocrashing - it's stupid, and the term "plunder" has already been long established in the GC world)

 

Ah... so once a term has been created we can't use something else? People were once covered in leeches to treat disease... should we still do that also?

 

Sorry, but I just don't think a forum is a place to get uppity.

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There was a Dallas Morning News article recently about Geocaching. It was a good article but the ending quoted someone as saying something like 'the cool thing is, it's kind of a secret society. It's like, I know something you don't know.' Well, yes, we try to be covert when retrieving or replacing a cache, but for us that's a very small part of it. We got into this for the excercise, met a lot of neat people, but secretive? No. Not that there's anything wrong with that (the freemasons for example), but it's not our thing. The media, almost by definition, will take the boldest or most sensational statement made and make that a much higher percent of their published content than it was in the overall context. Shame on the media for skewing meaning like this. Having said that, I am not a journalist and would probably see it differently as one.

 

astrojr1&G-O-GardenerGal

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quote:
People were once covered in leeches to treat disease... should we still do that also?

 

Actually they have been experimenting with leaches to increase blood flow to reattached limbs icon_wink.gif .

 

"Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, he'll sit in a boat and drink beer all day" - Dave Barry

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The meaning of terms always change as do their contexts...at all levels from the individual, to any group, through to the world as a whole. It is difficult to stop or control this process.

 

Sometimes you have to precise in your terms, and othes times it just doesn't matter.

 

What does it matter in this case?

 

______________________________________________ Kanto

It is entirely up to you if a thing leads to something useful or not.

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I found caching through a very positive newspaper article, so I won't complain! I also saw a recent article in the Rocky Mountain News. Haven't completely read it yet, but it seemed very positive and covered things very well. It even mentioned Buckley's site and had a graphic section showing how to cache. I won't complain about that. As others have said, it will be written about anyway, why not aim for the positive?

 

pokeanim3.gif

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Weather you like it or not. Without the media geocaching will not grow very much. As new people get into geocahing because of word of mouth, others drop out. If you want growth, you will need the media. I have interviewd twice in the past few months about a Geocahing seminar in run in my area and have had no prolems with the media. I would like to see more cachers do seminars, this is a good way to bring new people into the hobby. And it is not very hard.

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My wife and I have been involved in several interviews here in NYC, all have been positive for geocaching. Further, the interviews have not been about geocaching.com specifically, but about geocaching in general. It would be remiss, however, for these articles not to mention "gc.com" as, right now, they are the leaders in providing services for the game. So far, the 5 interviews we have done have been very positive for geocaching. The recent article in New York Newsday ( a full 2+ pages about geocaching) was very positive for the game. In all, the ideas expressed by Brian are very true. Better to be able to shape, in some way, the information going to reporters then to sit back and let them try and figure it out for themselves, especially in this day and age. One interviewer asked me how geocaching was effected by 9/11. He allowed me to give some tips about "smart" cache hiding ideas (how not to draw attention by placing a cache in an area that might draw unwanted attention to the hider/seeker).

 

On another note, the caches that you have mentioned (placed by someone with no finds and were burried)were placed by a group of children and counselors who didn't really understand what was going on.They made a mistake, the children were really excited about the game. They probably learned about it from the media. Some local cachers are now encouraging them and even giving them ideas on how to place caches that conform to the guidlines. Better not to chastise them too harshly lest we drive them away from such a fun game. The potential to learn about several different things (e.g. care for the environment and a little science) far outweigh the mistakes that were made, especially because the mistakes can be easily fixed.

 

I hate to tell you, caches were being plundered from pretty much the very begining. Caches will be plundered in proportion with the amount of caches that are placed and the amount of people out there walking around in the woods. there is nothing we can do about it, except making sure it is well hid. Nothing is solved by hiding our game from the world.

 

finally, you have been involved in geocaching for what, 6 months? People here have been involved for a couple of years. Some of us have been doing interviews for about a couple of years. Don't you think we have been down this road before? Don't you think we have observed positive as well as negative reprocussions? Why not sit back and watch for a while, you will learn that what is going on now has been going on for a while (pludered caches, for example). By doing interviews, some of us are helping bring the game to the fore, ensuring that it lasts for years to come. Some of us have greatly enjoyed the benefits of geocaching and hope it is preserved for our kids and others as well.

 

danny

 

I hope you didn't find this post too angry.

SR and dboggny.

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**On another note, the caches that you have mentioned (placed by someone with no finds and were burried)were placed by a group of children and counselors who didn't really understand what was going on.They made a mistake, the children were really excited about the game. They probably learned about it from the media. Some local cachers are now encouraging them and even giving them ideas on how to place caches that conform to the guidlines. Better not to chastise them too harshly lest we drive them away from such a fun game. The potential to learn about several different things (e.g. care for the environment and a little science) far outweigh the mistakes that were made, especially because the mistakes can be easily fixed.**

 

As an educator, I feel a need to address this. One of my students heard me talking about GeoCaching and thought it would be fun to place a cache. I leant him my GPS and suggested that he go find two local caches. He and his mom looked at the website and then went and found the two caches. I told him that he should read all of the rules before hiding.

 

That's fine that a camp counselor thought it fun to bring kids into caching -- kudos. However, when working with kids it's important to model what you are doing. For example, a truly authentic experience would have been to either print up the cache hiding rules and discuss them with the kids and then have them map out the type of cache, container, contents, etc. Kids are well aware that there are rules involved in things. It's never too early to teach responsible behavior. By showing the kids the rules, they would have had more ownership and would still have caches. Instead they created 6 caches which were quickly archived. These caches were also in unclean places... places these kids probably could have done without going to.

 

They should have gone on a hunt to SEE a cache, and then modeled there own after this.

 

I'm all for introducing GeoCaching to kids, however I feel that it is our job to teach kids to be responsible and to follow rules. No food, no digging... these are some basics of GeoCaching. Why not go for advice and guidance first? You are right, it didn't cause THAT much damage, but it's exactly the type of bad rep. we don't need... poorly researched and placed caches. Haven't you ever suggested a cache be archived because it was in an unsafe or dirty place? A place that would draw too much attention or wasn't wise? GeoCachers have this right... Squealy was totally within the realm of responsible GeoCaching when he pointed out that these caches were not following the rules. And I don't know if I'd use the word chastise... after all, isn't that what your post was doing? Let he who is without sin cast the first stone.

 

I read the Newsday article -- my mom mailed it to me and yes, it was positive. I don't think the idea was to ban the media from the joining the game, I think it was to raise awareness of being careful.

 

I haven't been caching too long, but in the time I have been I've tried to keep educated about it. And I do the same for my friends that I've involved. I take them with me, show them what it's all about, and hope for the best. I do the same with my students... because kids need to have good models when entering any activity.

 

BrianSnat -- you got me on the leeches... but I think you know what I was getting at.

 

Not trying to turn this into a war... GeoCaching is a peaceful, awesome activity. Just trying to point out that we all have a responsibility and I really don't think that hiding 6 caches that are against the rules was responsible.

 

Thank you,

NancyCz

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quote:
Originally posted by Clown Knife:

Have you seen these signs posted?

No skateboarding! No bicycling! No dogs! No overnight camping! Soon to be No Geocaching!

...


 

And people wonder why I come down hard on the "Anti" Crowd. There is more to life than staying home behind your closed and locked door. It ususally involves getting out and that steps on toes even if you are nice. To think that rollerblading (another one of those things that attracts signs) is evil along with biking, dogs, skateboarding is stupid and narrow minded.

 

The people that promote those "Anti" signs also have another sign they like to put up. "No public bathrooms - but do come in and spend your money on our overpriced junk"

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As a long-time PR professional, I can tell you that the press usually gets it about 98% right. The "insiders," however (those interviewed or involved) perceive the errors as glaring. It's just the way it is. It happens.

 

For those of you in this thread who are journalists, I challenge you to take a part in the spreading of the word, so to speak. Many "local" type publications (and some national ones) are open to by-lined articles by freelancers not on staff. What better way to tell the TRUE story, than have a geocacher write it?

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I think that if you have to ask if the post was "too angry" you already know that it was. What amazes me is that I put something up for people to repond to and discuss and I get personally attacked. That is pretty sad and pathetic.

 

Now as far as the caches in question - they were hidden in Flushing Meadow Park - (since you want to draw attention to the actual caches) by Hall of Science. You're saying they were hidden by kids and camp counselors, that is a great idea for a camp activity, however, when working with kids you need to be extremely responsible and teach them to follow directions and take responsibility for their actions. First and foremost, their adult counselors should have conducted the proper research into placing caches. This could have been turned into a literacy lesson through accountable talk. Perhaps even found a cache or two as an outing. When adults who work with and are the parents of children do not show them the right things, we are all in trouble.

 

I am glad to see that some cachers are going to help them. I sent them an email explaining some of the problems with their caches and offered them some help. I recieved no response, and I do not believe that I chastised them - unlike this post to a cache:

 

July 4 by sranddboggny.us (dboggny) (73 found)

2nd cache of the day. this place is disgusting. dead brids all over the place and garbage and the smell today was horrible. at any rate, the parks dept. has begun to re-landscape the area as evidenced by the bulldozer tracks along the water, might want to check and see if it survived. second, i question the wisdom of placing a cache under a bridge in this day and age. we didnt look very long for this one. thanks anyway

becky and danny

 

Actually this was a great cache. It wasn't under the bridge. It was just off the walking path that hundreds use on a daily basis. My friend (who I introduced by word or mouth) and I had a great time looking for it.

 

And while we are on the topic of chastising, who do you think you are to chastise me? As a matter of fact I have only been caching for what? 4 months not 6. In that time I have found 127 caches in 4 states, and in many different areas of NY. I have introduced about 6 people to Geocaching by word of mouth. I am constantly astounded with people's constant connection between age, and wisdom and competence. The three are not related.

 

Sit back and watch and learn? I don't think so. I don't need to. I have learned a tremendous amount in the 4 months I have been caching. I have gained an even greater respect for our environment than I had had before. I actually pick up crap when I am outside. The only time I pick up garbage is on my floor in the school where I am an Assistant Principal. Oh yeah, I received that post when I was 27, and people questioned that too. Not a lot of time in education. Well I guess it was enough - the same as four months and 127 caches gives me the right and responsibilty to question the use of the media in advertising our sport. Again not saying don't do it - just saying be careful, they do tend to slant things.

 

Let's keep this to discussions, not personal angry attacks.

 

I hope this is a lesson you can pass on to your child that is on the way. I wish you and your wife all the best with that. A second generation cacher, that is very cool (maybe even the third?) and is what it is all about.

 

-Squealy

 

F--- the establishment!

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quote:
Let's keep this to discussions, not personal angry attacks.

 

Personal, angry attacks? I had to read every post in this thread again, because I thought I may have missed something. I saw a number of posters who disagreed with you, but unless you're very thin skinned, I don't see how you can consider them to be personal attacks.

 

"Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, he'll sit in a boat and drink beer all day" - Dave Barry

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I guess if my skin were thinner I'd think that was a personal attack, Snat.

 

And for the Doots eater, I'm glad you enjoyed reading my logs - one cache that I compromised was archived because it was buried in a dirty park, compromising my health and that of other cachers - and another brought in Syncore and Nostral who saw me at a cache site and whom I gave a GeoCaching pamphlet to, and both are now avid cachers.

 

-Squealy

 

F--- the establishment!

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icon_smile.gif And here I thought I was the only member of the d*** news media around here. icon_smile.gif

 

Really though...if it weren't for a group of nice geocachers sharing their story for our local evening news story, my family and I would have missed out on tons of fun in the past year and a half.

 

*if the grammar and punctuation suck...it's because I am just a photographer...we can barely read you know.*

 

-Sushi of the fisherKings

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quote:
Originally posted by Czarniecki314:

Sarcasm is a tool with which only the intelligent are equipped.


 

...and like all tools, it can be used properly or inproperly.

 

______________________________________________ Kanto

It is entirely up to you if a thing leads to something useful or not.

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ah, the life of a reporter...

 

"can't punctuate, poor sentence structure, yap yap yap..."

icon_rolleyes.gif

listen people, consider taking every cache placed by anyone who heard about this through newspaper, tv or magazine out of the mix, and see how many you have left. you can't have the publicity until it suits you, and then wish it away. have it, or don't. and whether you like it or not, you have it.

 

___________________________________

 

who's got the pig?

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