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Logging etiqutte - long logs


BaSHful
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Writing long, descriptive logs is great! :)

Posting the same long descriptive log on every cache you found that day is not so great. :(

 

It might not be so bad if those 30-50 caches found had 30-50 cache owners, but posting the same log on 20 caches all owned by the same owner would get pretty annoying.

 

 

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In recent weeks I have changed the nature of the logs I write which has prompted one cache owner to take me to task and ask me to change (shorten) the log I wrote. I have also had feedback from another cache owner who enjoyed reading about my experiences.

 

I tend (mostly) to cache one day a week and typically find 30 to 50 caches in that day. The practice I have recently adopted is to write a comprehensive account for the whole day (400 to 600 words) and then copy and paste it into every log. If there is a major issue with any particular cache I will raise a separate "Needs Maintenance" log for it. I see this as a compromise between having something (hopefully) interesting to say and actually getting the logging completed. And, yes, it might eventually improve my GSAK badge for average length of log.

 

I welcome some honest feedback on this subject. I suspect there might be a range of views.....

 

If it helps, these are some of my recent logs:-

http://coord.info/GLB7R3Z4 The one that got the adverse comment.

http://coord.info/GLB053QT For which I received some good feedback.

http://coord.info/GLB1ZBAW Five days later.

http://coord.info/GLB61E05 Another recent one.

. I like the log book when you get there and write in it instead of online
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Writing long, descriptive logs is great! :)

Posting the same long descriptive log on every cache you found that day is not so great. :(

 

It might not be so bad if those 30-50 caches found had 30-50 cache owners, but posting the same log on 20 caches all owned by the same owner would get pretty annoying.

I post the same log I mean same day same events

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As a CO of quite a few caches, I welcome your long story of the whole day and I don't mind if you copy and paste it to each find. I'd prefer if there were a few sentences in there that relate to each cache, but I'm smart enough to recognise it's the same story and not read subsequent logs that come through the same.

I'm not as concerned about how it affects the CO as how it affects other seekers looking through the caches in the area. It's particularly bad when I'm in the field looking at logs for clues, and every single log in the area starts with 30 lines having nothing to do with the cache. Which reminds me: you know that cache relevant information people stick at the end of their cut&paste log that they think makes it OK? I never see it because after seeing the second cut&paste, I'm not going to bother hunting through the repetition to find the unique content.

 

Wow, some of the really strong negative opinions being expressed here surprise me - not being critical of anyone's opinions, it's just surprising me, and I'm learning something!

I'm not being critical, and I'm not convinced other responders are, either. I understand completely and am sympathetic about where the cut&paste idea comes from. But it's important for a habitual cut&paster to know how other people see the practice.

 

What we really need is a "trip log" that a bunch of find logs can be attached to. The cache logs have only info about the cache, but if I want to read about the entire trip, GC.com provides a link I can follow to the attached trip log. You could do something like that manually, as someone else has already mentioned, but I think it would be a useful feature integrated with bookmark lists.

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I'm not as concerned about how it affects the CO as how it affects other seekers looking through the caches in the area. It's particularly bad when I'm in the field looking at logs for clues, and every single log in the area starts with 30 lines having nothing to do with the cache. Which reminds me: you know that cache relevant information people stick at the end of their cut&paste log that they think makes it OK? I never see it because after seeing the second cut&paste, I'm not going to bother hunting through the repetition to find the unique content.

 

A log will never please everyone. I mainly write my logs for myself and for a few friends and not for other cachers who look for clues online. Typically my logs tell a lot about my way (hike/bike ride) to the cache and deal only shortly with the search for the container and the container.

 

I'm not using copy and paste, but except when I do a long multi cache which is the only cache of the day, I need often to include information about the way between the caches to one of the logs in order to write about what's important for me. I do not care about containers at all.

 

Cezanne

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on caches that there isn't much to say it's understandable

I just like to see if they come up against any trouble like muggles or they couldn't see it even though it was right in front of them. or that they took the long way to the cache.

 

On caches that are in nice areas i expect a little more then found or tftc.

 

Thanks...that's the sort of thing I'm trying to do now. :)

 

On another tangent, I found it very difficult to write a log for a clever cache we found recently because I didn't want to give it away. Writing the story of what steps we took when searching and how we actually stumbled across the cache would've told future cachers exactly where and what it was.

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Wow, some of the really strong negative opinions being expressed here surprise me - not being critical of anyone's opinions, it's just surprising me, and I'm learning something!

I'm not being critical, and I'm not convinced other responders are, either. I understand completely and am sympathetic about where the cut&paste idea comes from. But it's important for a habitual cut&paster to know how other people see the practice.

 

I never said anyone was being critical. I said that I was not being critical of others' opinions but that I was surprised by the strong negative opinions being expressed.

 

As a CO of quite a few caches, I welcome your long story of the whole day and I don't mind if you copy and paste it to each find. I'd prefer if there were a few sentences in there that relate to each cache, but I'm smart enough to recognise it's the same story and not read subsequent logs that come through the same.

I'm not as concerned about how it affects the CO as how it affects other seekers looking through the caches in the area. It's particularly bad when I'm in the field looking at logs for clues, and every single log in the area starts with 30 lines having nothing to do with the cache. Which reminds me: you know that cache relevant information people stick at the end of their cut&paste log that they think makes it OK? I never see it because after seeing the second cut&paste, I'm not going to bother hunting through the repetition to find the unique content.

 

Here's where I'm going to have to be a little critical though, because I feel something needs to be said. I have never seen it written anywhere that logs on caches should be written for the purpose of subsequent finders to find clues about the hide. On the contrary, logs are for the finder to record their experience, and consequently, the hider to receive feedback based on the positive/negative experience.

 

If I ever received a message from some third person asking me to shorten my logs so that they can more easily find clues from the log history (as I've seen mentioned once or twice in this thread), I'd have to take a moment to decide exactly how to respond - but it would undoubtedly consist of me politely telling them where to get off! Sorry, but that's just how I feel about one person enforcing made up rules on how another person should go geocaching.

 

I love reading long logs, so on any of my 370+ caches, bring 'em on! :)

Edited by funkymunkyzone
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I love reading long logs, so on any of my 370+ caches, bring 'em on! :)

 

I'll bet the same identical five paragraph log on twenty or thirty of your caches on the same day would change your mind...or at least make you qualify that statement.

 

Then you've already lost that bet! :)

 

As a CO of quite a few caches, I welcome your long story of the whole day and I don't mind if you copy and paste it to each find. I'd prefer if there were a few sentences in there that relate to each cache, but I'm smart enough to recognise it's the same story and not read subsequent logs that come through the same. Anything is better then "TFTC" or "." :)

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So this is how long cut and paste logs effect me.

 

I follow my GPS (Dakota 20)into GZ, usually looking at the description on the way to find out the size, and ratings etc. At GZ I give the area a good search for about 5/10 minutes, still no? Then I look at the hint (if there is one), search a little longer, still no? Then I look at logs to see if anyone has mentioned something that could assist me. Now here is where long cut and paste logs effect me. They can fill my limited GPS pages with useless information that has nothing to do with the cache in question, so instead of being able to read say 10 logs, I may only get to see about 5 logs.

 

I don't want to know what you had for lunch, how much fun you had at another cache miles away, etc, etc. I know others won't agree, but that is how I feel. Happy caching, RS.

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So this is how long cut and paste logs effect me.

 

I follow my GPS (Dakota 20)into GZ, usually looking at the description on the way to find out the size, and ratings etc. At GZ I give the area a good search for about 5/10 minutes, still no? Then I look at the hint (if there is one), search a little longer, still no? Then I look at logs to see if anyone has mentioned something that could assist me. Now here is where long cut and paste logs effect me. They can fill my limited GPS pages with useless information that has nothing to do with the cache in question, so instead of being able to read say 10 logs, I may only get to see about 5 logs.

 

I don't want to know what you had for lunch, how much fun you had at another cache miles away, etc, etc. I know others won't agree, but that is how I feel. Happy caching, RS.

 

And correct me if I'm wrong, but you're just talking about long logs, not necessarily cut & paste logs...?

 

I honestly am saddened that anyone would want to diminish someone else's enjoyment (I enjoy writing up long logs when I've had a great experience - and I often go back and re-read them later) just for their own convenience, or due to their own equipment limitations.

 

I guess you'd hate to see some of my logs on caches you are looking for, eg. http://coord.info/GL3C9WMN and http://coord.info/GL3CDZ8T - one of my best days ever caching, and unapologetically long logs, although not my longest.

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I mainly write my logs for myself and for a few friends and not for other cachers who look for clues online.

That sounds great! I cannot imagine someone writing for themselves or for their friends that would think it makes sense to say the exact same thing over and over.

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funkymunkyzone, at least your logs are not a cut and paste of everything you did that day, including what you did to find other caches. I've seen very long logs that have been cut and pastes that include nothing or very little about the cache in question. You can post a link to that sort of stuff if you want to. Each to their own I suppose, we all play the game differently. Doubt I'll ever get to Lesotho....looks fantastic.

Edited by Rainbow Spirit
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funkymunkyzone, at least your logs are not a cut and paste of everything you did that day, including what you did to find other caches. I've seen very long logs that have been cut and pastes that include nothing or very little about the cache in question. You can post a link to that sort of stuff if you want to. Each to their own I suppose, we all play the game differently. Doubt I'll ever get to Lesotho....looks fantastic.

 

Fair enough. I guess my point is what I have highlighted in bold above. Writing long logs, even with cut&paste content, is the prerogative of the finder and is not there for the purpose of others to use to find clues to the hide. One is free to check previous logs for clues, of course, but if they aren't written in a manner convenient, it's unreasonable to ask them to modify the way they enjoy playing the game.

 

Don't get me wrong, I don't doubt for a moment that you weren't polite or that you demanded anything of the person you PMed about long logs, but I just think it's wrong to ask them in the first place. It puts them in an uncomfortable position - they're just happily playing and enjoying the game, they have no beef with you, but will they now if they don't comply with your polite request?

 

In any case, you should come over for our mega event in Auckland in October and we can discuss it over a beer! (And commiserate over the cricket results too) ;)

Edited by funkymunkyzone
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As much as I enjoy longer logs I can see how some people might be annoyed by long cut and paste logs. I admit to doing some cutting and pasting during a day of caching, usually the first paragraph of the log describing the day and who I'm with. But the subsequent paragraph are always unique to each cache.

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As much as I enjoy longer logs I can see how some people might be annoyed by long cut and paste logs. I admit to doing some cutting and pasting during a day of caching, usually the first paragraph of the log describing the day and who I'm with. But the subsequent paragraph are always unique to each cache.

 

this is what i try and do.

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I love reading long logs, so on any of my 370+ caches, bring 'em on! :)

Whilst I don't own 300+ caches, I do own quite a few, and I feel the same way. I love to read. I'm like a mental wet-vac where the written word is concerned. (Yes, sadly, I've even read the user agreement when joining new websites) :lol: If the words are related to my favorite hobby, so much the better. I was once in a conversation at an event regarding hiding styles, and I was asked what kind of cache I liked to hide. My reply was, "I like to hide caches that generate long logs". The person who asked that took me to task by asking the obvious follow up question, (How?), and I had a tough time coming up with an answer. He also hid caches that generated long logs, so we discussed it at length, eventually agreeing that, for the most part, those caches which offer the greatest adventure for the individual seeker, (however they define adventure), will generally lead to those seekers writing logs longer than they normally would. It's an imperfect science, to be sure, but it seems to work.

 

My logs are almost exclusively bloggish, and are copy/pasted.

 

I do it this way because I enjoy telling my tale in this manner. I oft run afoul of the 4K character limit, and have to resort to one Found It and the rest on notes. To date, I've had no complaints, other than one cache owner who deleted my notes, leaving just the find log. Out of almost 2000 finds, I'd say this was at least a reasonable testimony that my local community accepts the practice.

 

As a qualifier, I'll add that I am not particularly attracted to power trails and other similar ilk, so for the most part, the hides I go for are owned by multiple cachers. Also, I don't hunt more than a handful of caches in any given day.

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The online log is there to record YOUR experience, share your experience with your future self, share your experience with the cache owners, and share it with future cachers, past cachers, and "interested" cachers. Do not limit yourself.

 

This article (likely quoted many times) can help most cachers organize their thoughts, find some key points to write about, and overall make a better online log even if you are not a "writer". http://geocacher-u.com/?page_id=13

 

Using the 4 T's above and evolving to the style/structure Briansnat eloquently outlines below seems a sound log strategy however long they may be.

 

As much as I enjoy longer logs I can see how some people might be annoyed by long cut and paste logs. I admit to doing some cutting and pasting during a day of caching, usually the first paragraph of the log describing the day and who I'm with. But the subsequent paragraph are always unique to each cache.

 

The implication that a long cut and paste log is the same as a "TFTC" can be true, however some thought, organization, and effort was put into that long cut and paste log which cannot be said for most "TFTC"'s. Once posted the long log (even a cut and paste) is a much more valuable record of your experience viewed in the isolation of cache visits and time.

 

Although, sometimes hints and clues are mentioned in logs that is not the raison d'etre. The scanning of logs for clues can be fruitful sometimes however the potential for them being in the last five or last ten logs is small. Further the possibility of the long log preventing someone from "finding" a clue in those five or ten is much less than that. Research and/or preplanning can overcome those difficulties or one can write a long pertinent log for the DNF.

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Hi Bernard,

 

Meant to talk to you about this at last night's Surrey Event, but completely forgot!

 

Like most (I think), I'd prefer to see your long, well-crafted log, repeated however many times, to a simple 'TFTC'. However, I can see how this can be negatively perceived.

 

I think a better compromise is to put your day's exploits in, say, the first log of the day, and a short 'cut and paste' summary (with a link back) in each of the subsequent logs. All logs should then include something specific to the cache. For the unmemorable, this may well be a simple 'TFTC'.

 

Finally, as far as I'm concerned the main purpose of a log is for the finder to record their experience and to provide feedback (and thanks) to the CO. Of course, I do look back through previous logs for clues when I'm struggling to find a cache in the field, but that's purely secondary and should in no way dictate how anybody writes their logs.

 

Just my two-pennyworth. :P

 

Regards,

Richard

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I love reading long logs, so on any of my 370+ caches, bring 'em on! :)

Whilst I don't own 300+ caches, I do own quite a few, and I feel the same way. I love to read. I'm like a mental wet-vac where the written word is concerned. (Yes, sadly, I've even read the user agreement when joining new websites) :lol: If the words are related to my favorite hobby, so much the better. I was once in a conversation at an event regarding hiding styles, and I was asked what kind of cache I liked to hide. My reply was, "I like to hide caches that generate long logs". The person who asked that took me to task by asking the obvious follow up question, (How?), and I had a tough time coming up with an answer. He also hid caches that generated long logs, so we discussed it at length, eventually agreeing that, for the most part, those caches which offer the greatest adventure for the individual seeker, (however they define adventure), will generally lead to those seekers writing logs longer than they normally would. It's an imperfect science, to be sure, but it seems to work.

 

My logs are almost exclusively bloggish, and are copy/pasted.

 

I do it this way because I enjoy telling my tale in this manner. I oft run afoul of the 4K character limit, and have to resort to one Found It and the rest on notes. To date, I've had no complaints, other than one cache owner who deleted my notes, leaving just the find log. Out of almost 2000 finds, I'd say this was at least a reasonable testimony that my local community accepts the practice.

 

As a qualifier, I'll add that I am not particularly attracted to power trails and other similar ilk, so for the most part, the hides I go for are owned by multiple cachers. Also, I don't hunt more than a handful of caches in any given day.

 

So, if I read this right...

You posted the same copy/paste log to several quality caches on more than one occasion?

 

Really? :sunsure:

 

It's going to take several shots of Tequila to get over this disappointment. :shocked:

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For me it's not about the length of a log, it's more about what was written.

 

The logs that I like most are those when a geocacher talks about the place he visited. Something special. It's interesting to read about how people liked a museum, or a lake, or some ancient manor or church, and (not really often but it happens sometimes) new facts they found being there. E.g. "we managed to talk to a local and this old man told us..." I don't mind if such story is longer than a usual log. When I myself find anything interesting (luckily, this happens almost everywhere I go for geocaching :) ) I write "thank you for getting me to this wonderful place... (and... )" - even if I'm actually logging a DNF.

 

I've also run into logs with useful data, e.g. changes in a bus timetable or recent restrictions on access to the territory. Again, it's not about the length of such logs. They provide information that may save me some time/health/money.

 

I know some geocachers around here who used to describe their geocaching adventures in details. "I got up at 8am, left home at 10am, missed my train, waited for the next one, the weather was sunny, it was hot, I was wearing a geocaching t-shirt, ...." etc. Just the same for the cache hunt: "First I approached the GZ from the train station, there was a pond... a cottage... two dogs, a collie and a terrier... my GPS lost signal... changed batteries... got through bushes... saw a squirrel..." I have nothing against anyone writing in such a manner but (sadly) I used to have troubles with these people publishing spoilers again and again. They used to discuss my hints, describe camouflage and enclose photos of themselves sitting near the hiding place. I'm not happy with such stories because it takes me time to read everything to find out if there's anything that should be removed/encrypted.

 

If anyone posts a log consisting only of "TFTC" I don't feel being insulted or anything... This doesn't mean much, I know. He/she may dislike the cache or just have not enough time at the moment or even don't know language good enough to write about his/her impressions.

 

I agree with people who talked critically about long copy-paste logs. Especially when I see such a log from geocacher who claimed several thousand finds and whose log is a whole paragraph of text. Sounds more like an advertisement then a geocaching log.

Edited by -CJ-
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I love reading long logs, so on any of my 370+ caches, bring 'em on! :)

Whilst I don't own 300+ caches, I do own quite a few, and I feel the same way. I love to read. I'm like a mental wet-vac where the written word is concerned. (Yes, sadly, I've even read the user agreement when joining new websites) :lol: If the words are related to my favorite hobby, so much the better. I was once in a conversation at an event regarding hiding styles, and I was asked what kind of cache I liked to hide. My reply was, "I like to hide caches that generate long logs". The person who asked that took me to task by asking the obvious follow up question, (How?), and I had a tough time coming up with an answer. He also hid caches that generated long logs, so we discussed it at length, eventually agreeing that, for the most part, those caches which offer the greatest adventure for the individual seeker, (however they define adventure), will generally lead to those seekers writing logs longer than they normally would. It's an imperfect science, to be sure, but it seems to work.

 

My logs are almost exclusively bloggish, and are copy/pasted.

 

I do it this way because I enjoy telling my tale in this manner. I oft run afoul of the 4K character limit, and have to resort to one Found It and the rest on notes. To date, I've had no complaints, other than one cache owner who deleted my notes, leaving just the find log. Out of almost 2000 finds, I'd say this was at least a reasonable testimony that my local community accepts the practice.

 

As a qualifier, I'll add that I am not particularly attracted to power trails and other similar ilk, so for the most part, the hides I go for are owned by multiple cachers. Also, I don't hunt more than a handful of caches in any given day.

 

So, if I read this right...

You posted the same copy/paste log to several quality caches on more than one occasion?

 

Really? :sunsure:

 

It's going to take several shots of Tequila to get over this disappointment. :shocked:

'Tis shameful, I know.

Got a spare shot glass? :lol:

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OK, it's been a while since the last post so it's time to take stock.

 

1. Thank-you everybody for all the comments made.

 

2. As anticipated, there is a spectrum of opinion. It is clear it will be (nearly) impossible to satisfy all of the people all of the time.

 

3. I a result of all your feedback I have already modified my logging practice, though I'm still using a significant element of copy and paste.

 

4. I will never again write a log about every cache of the day and copy/paste it to every cache found that day.

 

5. I have been experimenting with the approach of writing a generic section that gets repeated for every cache and then a specific bit for each individual cache. This works well when I've done relatively few and diverse caches and very badly for a long power circuit. It can also take more time than I would like to devote to logging.

 

6. I am sure my logging practice will continue to evolve but I will always endeavour to keep in mind the comments you have all made.

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OK, it's been a while since the last post so it's time to take stock.

 

1. Thank-you everybody for all the comments made.

 

2. As anticipated, there is a spectrum of opinion. It is clear it will be (nearly) impossible to satisfy all of the people all of the time.

 

3. I a result of all your feedback I have already modified my logging practice, though I'm still using a significant element of copy and paste.

 

4. I will never again write a log about every cache of the day and copy/paste it to every cache found that day.

 

5. I have been experimenting with the approach of writing a generic section that gets repeated for every cache and then a specific bit for each individual cache. This works well when I've done relatively few and diverse caches and very badly for a long power circuit. It can also take more time than I would like to devote to logging.

 

6. I am sure my logging practice will continue to evolve but I will always endeavour to keep in mind the comments you have all made.

 

Thank-you. B)

This is the most anyone could have expected. :)

 

I'm certain the COs of caches you find will be much appreciative...even if they don't say so.

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When we have a big caching day I often publish with GSAK which is equivalent to using cut and paste but is much faster.

 

Every cache will have the same log telling the story of our day. Above that log I have a line of asterisks. Above that line I will add any information that is different for that particular cache. That way the CO does not have to read through the entire log to see if anything was added.

 

Here is an example from a few weeks ago.

 

 

Barriers stop ATV's but they know the way around. An ATV accessed the trail so PA took his license number as he went by. The driver stopped and gave PA hell and a few well chosen words and then sped off in a cloud of dust.

 

License number XWO 894

 

 

***********

 

TFTC

 

These logs were published with GSAK. The following is the same log for all the caches today. If there were additional comments, they are written above

 

Weather looked good so we head up to Bathurst area to do a bit of bike caching and of course we have to stop on the way to pick up an assortment of caches including a bunch of P & G.

 

Logging these around 4 pm. Will go out again later and get a few more.

 

And here is another one

 

.

PA got feet a little wet on the boggy terrain

 

***********

 

TFTC

 

Day 2 of Bathurst caching trip

 

These logs were published with GSAK. The following is the same log for all the caches today. If there were additional comments, they are written at the top of the log, above the ********

 

Today started vry early in the morning with a few caches in town and then we did some bike caching on the NB Trail . We finished with an assortment of caches including some walks on the NB trails and a bunch of P & G.

 

 

.

Edited by Ma & Pa
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I really like logs that tell a story or have info about the weather and / or the day in general. TFTC is boring. But your logs are a bit much with all the info about all the caches on one page. When I read a log about a cache I don't really care about all the other caches you found that day. However, logging is to each his own. So I say do what you like and enjoy the game as you enjoy it. Remember it IS A game.

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When I first started, I tried to write something meaningful on every cache, including being honest about the difficulties I had finding the cache so that the person after me might benefit from my struggles. Oh man, did I piss off a bunch of cache creators, including having a DNF deleted and receiving an e-mail that I should stop geocaching.

 

Those negative responses didn't deter me from continuing with my honesty. Because the thing is, not everyone thinks the same. The first light post cache I found was almost a DNF because I had never seen one before and would not have thought to touch a large utility pole. I ran into more experienced cachers at a park that day and they told me about that type of cache. Most of the other finders thought that was a standard cache, but it was totally new and difficult to me. Everyone playing the game is playing at different levels and coming from different places, so maybe I can give them a hand in my logs, you know? I also used to try to say something really positive if I had a great time at a cache.

 

What I've noticed is that people delete my photos or delete my logs or get pissed off at my honesty and assume I was attacking their precious cache. What I've also noticed is certain cache creators whose coordinates are consistently 30 feet off, badly written poems, really lame hints, general mocking of anyone who is new to the game, poor terrain ratings, and so on.

 

Which is to say, do whatever the hell you want. Nobody in this game is actually working to make the game enjoyable for everyone, they're making the game enjoyable for themselves. I photograph something at every cache, because I like photography. Cache creators regularly delete my photographs, because the game is about something else to them and they don't care that it affects my game. I no longer post meaningful logs, because I'm just tired of putting effort into something that I think no one really cares about.

 

F*ck etiquette. Play your own game. If a lengthy log is annoying, I can scroll past it and a cache creator can easily delete that e-mail. Honestly, your words are not a burden, and don't let anyone treat you like they are.

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I am a bit of a hybrid copy and paster. I never copy and paste multiple logs from a day of Geocaching. I always write what I was up to and my experience. The only time I give a simple TFTC is if your cache sucked and I have nothing to say about it. Even then I will usually say why I didn't like it.

 

Where my cut and paste comes into play is at the end of the log. Here are some examples.

 

I rode my bicycle to the far trail and then made my way back to GZ. At first I was searching near the creek bottom, then realized I needed to be over more. Then I easily spotted the cache. I took down the number and decided I had to go up for it. I checked into the location on Facebook and said if I didn't report back in 15 minutes, I would be laid out at the bottom of this tree and to come get me. The climb up wasn't too bad, but getting the cache with one hand for a short guy was tough. I eventually got it, snapped a selfie, and then coming back down was much easier. No rain while I was up there, but man was it hot and humid. TFTC!

 

Out on a late night/early morning Geocaching run. I had 11 finds with 1 FTF and two DNFs as I drove just about 100 miles to finish the prerequisites of the Scooby-Doo Mystery Series and work on my Pyramid Scheme - Base 10 http://coord.info/GC3AT1V requirements.

 

Notice I give a brief synopsis of the day at the end of the log.

 

Some more...

 

up the hill and I thought for sure he was going to jump into a yucca plant. He never did thankfully. After some searching around the rock without the hint, I eventually made the find. The hint wold have taken me right there had I bothered to read it on site. TFTC and the FTF!

 

We had to march back down the road and call the dogs a bit before they came running back up the road. I was worried for a little bit, but not much.

 

EIEIO and the two pups and I headed up the hill to get some FTFs on a Monday day off. We found 11 Geocaches, 7 of which were FTFs.

 

Again, just a quick blurb at the end about the day in general.

 

Even on my longest day...

 

I really was getting tired of running pocket queries and seeing the Slutty Munchie and TOW Series all unfound and not that far from my house. So in my typical fashion, I decided if I was going to get them, I had better get them all in the same day. I left Taft at about 455 AM and got to my first cache at 535 AM. I then proceeded to Geocache all day long and finally stopped at about 745 PM and headed to Mountain Mike's for some dinner and refreshment. My quick reference says I found about 240 caches for the day and had about 17 DNFs.

 

After finishing the Slutty Munchie series this morning, I was wondering how TOW was going to work out. Thankfully, TOW's containers and locations were just a little nicer so I actually enjoyed this series. It was less like work and more enjoyable over all. I think the containers is what made this series so fun. I knew what to look for, even though they weren't all the same. And the places they were hidden varied through out the day. I will definitely recommend it to others.

 

A nice spot to stop and use the restroom. I liked the easy to find container. Find #243 of the day. TFTC.

 

I did put my comments at the end for some reason, but I at least put a comment on each cache that day. If I couldn't remember the cache, I put I couldn't remember it. This is why I really didn't like doing two power trails in a day. I am more about the experience than just a bunch of numbers and my logs tend to reflect that.

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In recent weeks I have changed the nature of the logs I write which has prompted one cache owner to take me to task and ask me to change (shorten) the log I wrote. .....................I welcome some honest feedback

 

methinks your caching logs resemble more a blog...IMO, each cache find would be better suited with its' own account of your find with just a link to your day's blog page...then we may peruse your adventures at leisure & the phone cachers would have space opened up for more info on their screens...

 

having been regaled by a days' history like yours at many meet n eats, i look forward to cachers sharing those tales in person - yours, i'm sure, would be well received also...

 

personally, yes, I have been known to commit each and every sinful geo-complaint listed above in these thread posts...

having said that,i still strive to make my geo-adventures' logs Fun to read while wearing Humble Hyacinth lipstick :anicute: ...

continuing to ask my fellow cachers' forgiveness, as i may err again unintentionally...

 

good luck Bashful and others in your geo-literary quest of expression...

geocaching ROCKS and is very seldom dull...Life is still an adventure...

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In recent weeks I have changed the nature of the logs I write which has prompted one cache owner to take me to task and ask me to change (shorten) the log I wrote. I have also had feedback from another cache owner who enjoyed reading about my experiences.

 

I tend (mostly) to cache one day a week and typically find 30 to 50 caches in that day. The practice I have recently adopted is to write a comprehensive account for the whole day (400 to 600 words) and then copy and paste it into every log. If there is a major issue with any particular cache I will raise a separate "Needs Maintenance" log for it. I see this as a compromise between having something (hopefully) interesting to say and actually getting the logging completed. And, yes, it might eventually improve my GSAK badge for average length of log.

 

I welcome some honest feedback on this subject. I suspect there might be a range of views.....

 

If it helps, these are some of my recent logs:-

http://coord.info/GLB7R3Z4 The one that got the adverse comment.

http://coord.info/GLB053QT For which I received some good feedback.

http://coord.info/GLB1ZBAW Five days later.

http://coord.info/GLB61E05 Another recent one.

 

logs are too short, logs are too long....geocachers are the most fickle whiney complaing bunch ninnies i ever met

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I don't really care for the cut and paste log entries, but I'm fine with it as long as they are accurate. I had a cache that I couldn't find on my watchlist because I am almost certain it's not there. One day I finally got a notification that it had been found so I went to the page to see if could learn anything from the log entry. It was a cut and paste job. I have my doubts that the person actually found the cache (it hasn't been found since their entry). I have a feeling they mistakenly logged the thing as found and pasted in their entry. I'd rather have a simple TFTC that was unique to that cache than a cut and paste job that doesn't really mean anything or help at all.

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If you leave me a favorite vote, feel free to leave a cut and paste log about how hot the weather was that day or if you prefer, a TFTC log works. Hell, you log can be a "." for all I care! Just gimme da votes :lol:

 

But yeah, in all seriousness, cut and paste logs are bad because 1) they usually tell you nothing about the specific cache and 2) often one or two caches owners get the same logs over and over from you.

 

For example, I have five caches in a shopping center. One time, a guy left the same CUT and PASTE log for each cache. It talked about how he woke up and that it raining and blah, blah, blah... but no information was given about the actual caches! I don't really care that you put the wrong shoes on in the morning, just let me know if you liked the cache or not! ARGHHHHHHH! B)

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I just stumbled across this topic and although it is dead (an there probably is a newer thread available) I'm going to leave my two cents.

 

I don't hide caches so my view is strictly from a "finder's" perspective. Personally I'm in it for the game and not the journaling. I'm one of the oddballs that have left a "TFTC! :)" and not given a second thought about it. Not that I didn't enjoy the cache. I just am trying to get my log in before I forget. When I read past logs I'm trying to get a hint. If I have to scroll through 10 paragraphs about your geocaching vacation testimony then I get slightly irked.

 

HOWEVER, I know that people celebrate in different ways. If you want to tell us a story...great. I'm sure someone will appreciate it. If you aren't much of a writer and just want to get the smiley...great, get those smilies!

 

Either way I'm glad that people are logging and finding geocaches. What would be bad is if the cache owners started to delete logs because they were "too short" or "too long". Who cares, they got to enjoy your cache either way. :)

Edited by ClearlyPixelated
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I'm one of the oddballs that have left a "TFTC! :)" and not given a second thought about it. When I read past logs I'm trying to get a hint. If I have to scroll through 10 paragraphs about your geocaching vacation testimony then I get slightly irked. HOWEVER, I know that people celebrate in different ways.

Curious where you'd get those hints from past logs if everyone wrote "TFTC". :)

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Me I would like to do and see logs that are at least a sentance or more but not a long drawn out novel unless there is a real good story about the experience.

What I don't like to see is TFTH and copy and paste more then a day. I copy and paste some during the day and add some extra if I can remember the cache, and may change the C&P as the day goes by. But recently I have been seeing logs on my caches by some cachers who are copy and pasting the same thing every day they cache. I look at the beginning of the log and just don't want to read the rest because I know how the rest will go. Be nice to be more creative and how many of you read logs just hoping for a little bit of a hint?

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I often stop reading long logs after three to four lines. I find them a little too much. In other words, you are talking too much.

I try hard to make my logs worth reading. If I can fit in useful info, a compliment, and maybe some humor into a tightly written log, I'll feel like I've played the game well. My game.

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The better the cache, the longer my logs B)

It seems CO's mostly appreciate my logs because I commented (complimented) on them. As I log with GSAK I make a template for the day and add a unique comment for every cache. If it's for a micro behind a tree/utility pole I will just write "easy find" but a 15 WP multi with quality tags will get an almost WP by WP story about the cacheroute (without giving things away, of course).

 

I've seen "TFTC" or even "." logs on caches that kept us busy for hours and where the CO must have spend countless hours a a lot of money to create them and I find that disrespectful to the CO. After all that effort you could at least "reward" the CO with more than TFTC.

 

In Belgium and the Netherlands CO's are increasingly putting a banner on their cachepages saying "This CO says NO to TFTC". I support them fully.

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Rare for me to cut N paste.

That'd mean I'd have to find more than one cache a day ! :laughing:

This past souvi weekend, I did have one sentence that I C&P onto another, just stating why I was out (have intentionally left local caches unfound just for days like this).

Odd that some do keep track, "Marty, the old fart finally found your cache"...

 

I write logs to thank the CO for the fun, and to give me an idea where the heck I've been/what I've done over the years.

Often wordy, but (so far...) never received a mail saying so.

- So you folks with short attention spans...tough. :lol:

Most COs seem to be just happy they got more than a tftc (and often say so in mail).

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I'm with funkymunkyzone. I love reading long logs, whether on my own caches or other people's. I believe the log is for the benefit of the CO, not future finders. I would never put information in a log that I thought would help future finders. That's the CO's prerogative. It is up to the CO to decide how much information to give. Anything helpful in a log is a spoiler, although I make an exception for bad coordinates or changed conditions. If the CO has them wrong, I post corrected coordinates, or if the hint says waist high and it's now on the ground I'll mention that the hint doesn't apply now, but I won't say more. I don't have hundreds of active caches out there, but I do have dozens and sometimes people log five or six at a time. I don't remember anyone ever pasting the same long log on a series of caches. I've gotten a cut and paste short log on a bunch sometimes, which is disappointing, not because they're the same, but because they're short and meaningless. If I did get a long log repeated that discusses several caches, like the ones the OP posted links to, I would be delighted. His logs are well-written and enjoyable to read. Once I realized the second and third were the same, I would just delete the remaining emails, or just open them enough to see the length appears the same. That only takes a few seconds and would in no way detract from the pleasure of reading the excellent log in the first place. I have some of my favorite caches (by others) on my watchlist and look forward to the logs of finders who have had the same enjoyable experience with those caches I did.

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I believe the log is for the benefit of the CO, not future finders.

 

This is the only part that I might have some disagreement. The log records my experience - whether it is a stream of consciousness because something reminded me about an old girlfriend; an opportunity to comment on alien encounters; a line or two about whatever was on my mind; or simply an opportunity to post a photo of something that interested me and is vaguely associated with the area around the cache. That is why I never cut and paste, even when I did over 150 repetitive caches on a trail where I knew the CO or any future finder would not be reading them.

 

Sadly, too many of my logs veer towards the mundane - when nothing in particular comes to mind. What can I say about a letterbox hybrid with a store-bought stamp in a location that I would not have visited except for the LBH label? But generally, I associate a mundane line or two with my work having destroyed the last vestiges of truly creative writing.

 

Give me an interesting photo op, a place with some history, or a good title to the cache, and I might find something to write about. So in that respects a log might also benefit the CO. I would rather read about what resulted when something inspired a cacher than about finding a container - unless the adventure in getting there was what inspired a cacher.

Edited by geodarts
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We had one cacher a while ago who would copy and paste a long long log on every cache they logged. It wasn't even about the actual trip/day that they'd had but was more a long spiel explaining why they preferred long logs. At the end of the boilerplate text they tended to add something like 'Quick easy find. Thanks.'

 

We went out one day to do a series and found to our horror that they had been there the previous day. I was fine after the 15 mile walk that day, but my thumbs took two weeks to recover from the amount of scrolling required to get at any logs previous to theirs.

 

Question: if you're planning to C&P the 'overall day experience' then why not just put that in cache #1 and refer to that in each subsequent log?

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Question: if you're planning to C&P the 'overall day experience' then why not just put that in cache #1 and refer to that in each subsequent log?
I've done something similar on a group hike. My first log listed who was in the group, and explained that we were signing the logs as Karl's Krew. All the other logs merely indicated that we signed as Karl's Krew, with the name linked to the first log.
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I would never put information in a log that I thought would help future finders. That's the CO's prerogative. It is up to the CO to decide how much information to give. Anything helpful in a log is a spoiler, although I make an exception for bad coordinates or changed conditions.

 

While I'd never put anything in my log that gave away the hide, I'll frequently add tips about the journey to GZ. Often after finding a cache I discover there's a much easier route than the one I'd taken, like a track a few metres away from where I'd bashed my way through the scrub, or a thicket of thorny vines that would be best avoided. Maybe even an interesting little detour along the way that others may enjoy. We have a pretty cooperative caching community around here and these sorts of tips are generally appreciated.

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I often stop reading long logs after three to four lines. I find them a little too much. In other words, you are talking too much.

I try hard to make my logs worth reading. If I can fit in useful info, a compliment, and maybe some humor into a tightly written log, I'll feel like I've played the game well. My game.

I had read many of your logs and I enjoy them..but I cant say that for everybody. I like to read logs from finders that travel the world and give me a little peek into their world of traveling. When someone write long logs and never really travel outside 100 miles of their home base, I find them boring.

 

Humor does make me wanna read more.

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I believe the log is for the benefit of the CO, not future finders.

 

I totally disagree with that. I look for logs that will help me decide if that cache is for me. I often do that when I am traveling. Plus, I look for logs if there is problems. This might be just me, but I feel some CO ignore logs when the finders is trying to tell them there is a problem. When I am traveling overseas, I read many interesting logs to help me get to GZ. I been in area where only the local people know about that given spots and they look at you really odd and wonder what you are doing there! I love that feeling, but it can be dangerous. I am the only fat white american in the room! :lol:

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