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Logging a DNF on a first run


karmabottle
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Our family is new to geocaching (just under 100 found since June), but I've noticed something odd. Lately I've twice noticed people logging DNFs on caches that just got placed and published. I saw two last week where before there was even an FTF, someone or several someones had logged it as a DNF.

 

Another recent incident was when someone logged a DNF while writing in the log entry that they didn't even have their GPS with them, had not looked at the location prior to going, etc.

 

Our family has an unspoken rule: we don't log a DNF until we've tried it 2-3 times with serious, serious effort! It almost seems like bad "etiquette" to log a DNF on a cache that:

 

1. just got published and hasn't even got a FTF yet

2. you admittedly didn't look too hard for or admittedly didn't look properly.

 

Am I crazy? Is it acceptable form to do this, or is it better to give it a few tries before you report a DNF? It probably doesn't matter, but that's our rule because we don't want to give the impression that the cache is the one with the problem when chances are it is us with the problem! LOL.

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Our family is new to geocaching (just under 100 found since June), but I've noticed something odd. Lately I've twice noticed people logging DNFs on caches that just got placed and published. I saw two last week where before there was even an FTF, someone or several someones had logged it as a DNF.

 

Another recent incident was when someone logged a DNF while writing in the log entry that they didn't even have their GPS with them, had not looked at the location prior to going, etc.

 

Our family has an unspoken rule: we don't log a DNF until we've tried it 2-3 times with serious, serious effort! It almost seems like bad "etiquette" to log a DNF on a cache that:

 

1. just got published and hasn't even got a FTF yet

2. you admittedly didn't look too hard for or admittedly didn't look properly.

 

Am I crazy? Is it acceptable form to do this, or is it better to give it a few tries before you report a DNF? It probably doesn't matter, but that's our rule because we don't want to give the impression that the cache is the one with the problem when chances are it is us with the problem! LOL.

 

Well, I predict this will be a long thread, and be all over the place. I'll start out by saying if you looked for a cache, and didn't find it, you didn't find it. So why not log a DNF?

 

There are many reasons (or excuses, I guess I could say) why people don't log DNF's, for example, if they "didn't look hard enough".

 

Bottom line, a lot of DNF's never get logged. No one will ever have any statistics, and no one will ever know the reason why so many don't get logged on the website. I Certainly don't know, I'm not an amatuer sociologist, nor do I play one on the internet. :rolleyes:

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you post a log to a cache to tell the world something about the cache. if it's just something, it's a note. if it's because you looked and didn't find it, it's a DNF. if you've looked and found it, it's a found. if you don't have anything to say, you don't post at all. it's as simple as that.

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We log DNF's all the time. You can't find them all. If you go out and search and do not find the cache for whatever reason it's a dnf. Make a funny log on how you couldn't find the cache and try again later. I've logged a dnf on a new cache a few times. On another note dnf serve a purpoe for the CO to maybe check on the cache as well. We have over 175 dnf's. No shame in a DNF. Just have to try again. :rolleyes:

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Our family is new to geocaching (just under 100 found since June), but I've noticed something odd. Lately I've twice noticed people logging DNFs on caches that just got placed and published. I saw two last week where before there was even an FTF, someone or several someones had logged it as a DNF.

 

Another recent incident was when someone logged a DNF while writing in the log entry that they didn't even have their GPS with them, had not looked at the location prior to going, etc.

 

Our family has an unspoken rule: we don't log a DNF until we've tried it 2-3 times with serious, serious effort! It almost seems like bad "etiquette" to log a DNF on a cache that:

 

1. just got published and hasn't even got a FTF yet

2. you admittedly didn't look too hard for or admittedly didn't look properly.

 

Am I crazy? Is it acceptable form to do this, or is it better to give it a few tries before you report a DNF? It probably doesn't matter, but that's our rule because we don't want to give the impression that the cache is the one with the problem when chances are it is us with the problem! LOL.

You're crazy - but that's a given if you cache!

 

Some of my favorite FTF's have been when I've seen a series of DNF's on a new cache and then I go a find it. So DNF's on a cache without a FTF are good.

 

As someone mentioned, any time you don't find a cache you can/should log a DNF. Yes, sometimes they can mean a problem with the cache, and sometimes they just mean the seeker didn't find the cache. The content of the log will let people know if there is a problem, not just the presence of the log.

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We log a DNF if we did not find the cache. We do it on the first visit, if we have made an attempt to find the cache. There are a few caches that have more than one DNF from us - some we eventually found...some not.

We logged a find on a cache we did recently with no coords, hints or description on hand - we just had a vague idea of where it might be. If we hadn't found it we would have logged the DNF. Each to their own, as far as I'm concerned. You're not crazy.

As far as the DNFs on just published caches...I don't have a problem with that at all...we've done it. Some can be tricky....

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I'm guessing the TS is thinking and practicing the idea that if there is a DNF people will not go look for it and the cache owner may run out to check on it. Although the people not looking for it is probably somewhat true, I think its usually multiple DNF's that scare people away and motiviate active cache owners to do a maint. run.

With a new cache, quite a few cachers will wonder if the coords are good, especially if its a relatively new hider and may wait for a find. I still think that it is perfectly OK to log a DNF on any cache you DNF. No one should have a problem with it if you looked and didn't find. I like finding caches that other DNFed on. Just one more quirky challenge that I enjoy.

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is it better to give it a few tries before you report a DNF? It probably doesn't matter, but that's our rule because we don't want to give the impression that the cache is the one with the problem when chances are it is us with the problem!
Don't worry about causing concern. If you didn't find it, log a "Did Not Find". There are many possible problems with a new cache placement, and cache logs are useful.

 

If you can't find it, maybe it's not as easy as you thought. That DNF log tells me I might, for example, need to set aside a little more time to search. If you don't do any DNF and it's all "Found Its", it definitely will be harder to find than I expect.

Edited by kunarion
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Logs on caches give other cachers information. DNF's are part of that. I personally appreciate others logging them. As a cache owner it can help you gauge if your difficulty rating/coords are accurate, or signal that their may be a problem. If it is a simple cache it can let the owner know to check on it. On more challenging caches it let's other cachers know they kind of challenge they are looking at. I don't see any problem with logging DNF's... it doesn't negatively effect the cache in anyway and it is just another piece of information for other cachers.

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I'm guessing the TS is thinking and practicing the idea that if there is a DNF people will not go look for it and the cache owner may run out to check on it. Although the people not looking for it is probably somewhat true, I think its usually multiple DNF's that scare people away and motiviate active cache owners to do a maint. run.

it's been mentioned many times before: there's a psychological aspect to DNF logs (and also to found logs for that matter). it's quite common for a cache which usually gets found logs on a regular basis, let's say once a week, to suddenly stop getting logs. a month may pass, maybe two, until somebody posts a DNF. then suddenly DNF logs start pouring in. as it turns out, the cache had been missing all that time.

 

it also works the other way around: a cache which gets found logs less frequently, let's say only once a month, because it's somewhat harder to find, gets a DNF log. again, suddenly the DNF logs start pouring in and nobody seems to be able to find it any more. the owner thinks it may be missing and goes to check, but it's there. he posts a log saying that it's there. suddenly the DNF logs stop again, and the infrequent found logs pick up again.

 

that doesn't mean you shouldn't post DNFs. just something to be aware of.

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Our family is new to geocaching (just under 100 found since June), but I've noticed something odd. Lately I've twice noticed people logging DNFs on caches that just got placed and published. I saw two last week where before there was even an FTF, someone or several someones had logged it as a DNF.

 

Another recent incident was when someone logged a DNF while writing in the log entry that they didn't even have their GPS with them, had not looked at the location prior to going, etc.

 

Our family has an unspoken rule: we don't log a DNF until we've tried it 2-3 times with serious, serious effort! It almost seems like bad "etiquette" to log a DNF on a cache that:

 

1. just got published and hasn't even got a FTF yet

2. you admittedly didn't look too hard for or admittedly didn't look properly.

 

Am I crazy? Is it acceptable form to do this, or is it better to give it a few tries before you report a DNF? It probably doesn't matter, but that's our rule because we don't want to give the impression that the cache is the one with the problem when chances are it is us with the problem! LOL.

I have seen this a few times over the years. It could be the cache is just hard to find.

I have always seen cases in which a new cacher submits the new cache for review before placing the cache container. I guess they want to make it will get approved before the place. I some cases a good understanding of the guidlines would make placing a cache easier.

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The rules people invent for themselves never cease to astonish me.

 

The DNF log is not a strike against you, and it's not an attack on the cache owner. A DNF log can serve one or more of several purposes.

 

It lets you keep a record of caches you've searched for.

 

It alerts other geocachers to potential problems.

 

It keeps the owner apprised of the cache's status.

 

If you looked for five minutes and gave up because your hands were cold, it's OKAY to log a DNF - just make sure it's detailed.

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Lets see, I was the 2nd to respond, and now there's like 17 responses. This is all in the short time I forgot to add something to my post. Don't let these unanimous responses fool you. Most people never log DNF's!! :rolleyes: But if you don't, how are you ever going to qualify for one of the dozens of challenge caches around that require you to join the "century club" of DNF's (i.e 100 or more logged DNF's)? That inspired me to check, 321 logged DNF's since 2003, baby. :anitongue:

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I always log a DNF if I "Do Not Find" the cache. However, I never log multiple DNFs. I will go back and edit my original post to indicate that I have searched 2, 3, or 4 times without success, but I don't like to clog up the logs by posting multiple DNFs for the same cache--just my own thing. :rolleyes: To each his own.

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Lets see, I was the 2nd to respond, and now there's like 17 responses. This is all in the short time I forgot to add something to my post. Don't let these unanimous responses fool you. Most people never log DNF's!! :rolleyes: But if you don't, how are you ever going to qualify for one of the dozens of challenge caches around that require you to join the "century club" of DNF's (i.e 100 or more logged DNF's)? That inspired me to check, 321 logged DNF's since 2003, baby. :anitongue:

 

I just looked at my DNF's

 

495 DNF logs with 4812 finds, greater than 10%

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We only log a DNF if we gave the cache it's due respect - if we only had five minutes or so we don't log it because we didn't really try.

 

But if we hunt that cache HARD we always log the DNF, with the tag that 'we hope we just missed something'. A lot of times we did 'just miss something', and those gnaw on us and we go-back-and-go-back until we get the sucker.

But a lot of times our DNF leads the CO towards disabling the cache because our DNF alerted them that it was missing.

 

Posting a DNF is a pure *Golden Rule* situation for us. What would you have liked the previous visitors to log if their experience is the same as yours?

 

There are times that our schedule doesn't allow us to attempt a cache with a recent string of DNF's, so we have to trust that those DNF's indicate honest tries. That is why we only DNF honest tries. And if that means we are on public record for missing the 'trick', oh well... we are forever acknowledging that we are just as human as everyone else.

 

At least we don't contribute to situations like when we worked a cache hard only to find out later that a lot of other cachers had been there, came up just as empty as us, but out of pride or whatever didn't log their DNF.

 

I am comfortable with our judging our DNF posts via the *Golden Rule*.

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Lets see, I was the 2nd to respond, and now there's like 17 responses. This is all in the short time I forgot to add something to my post. Don't let these unanimous responses fool you. Most people never log DNF's!! :anitongue: But if you don't, how are you ever going to qualify for one of the dozens of challenge caches around that require you to join the "century club" of DNF's (i.e 100 or more logged DNF's)? That inspired me to check, 321 logged DNF's since 2003, baby. :anicute:

Like Mr Yuck says. Some cachers just will not log a DNF. One cacher that I have done af caching with is like that. When we would go out and spend a day finding caches there would also be a few DNF's. I would tell him not to forget to log his DNF's and we would respond "I always log my DNF's" well I have never seen him log a DNF :rolleyes: and we cached together 3 or 4 days a week for about three years until I went back to school two years ago. :anitongue:

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I log a DNF if I gave it a really good try without success. If it was half-hearted due to weather or time constraints, then I don't log it.

 

Yes, a lot of people are like jomouse and dnfu (pretty ironic name there, eh?), and they always come out of the closet in these threads. Then there are a lot of people like Johnny Vegas mentioned who don't log them, period. I too know a guy with about 3,000 finds who doesn't log them. I'll stop short of saying he's never logged one ever though. Pride, embarrassment, whatever. :rolleyes:

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Any chance you are using a smartphone to cache?

 

The app that I use I can pull up the logs. The notes, needs maintenance , published logs all come up as Did Not Find on the app. Not sure why. So I see a note listed as a DNF, but I realize it now that it's just the app listing it that way.

 

I use a BlackBerry. Might be the same with iPhone and Droid. Just a thought.

 

Example: Here I left a note saying I'm dropping a TB off. On the cache page it's listed as note of course. In the BlackBerry app it shows as a DNF:

utf-8BQ2FwdHVyZTdfMTlfNDIuanBn.jpg

 

Reviewer Notes get turned into DNF on the app too:

utf-8BQ2FwdHVyZTdfMjBfMS5qcGc.jpg

 

I have left notes for my hides BEFORE the cache was published. In this case, if you use a smartphone to cache, you'll see my note as a DNF before the Published log.

Edited by SeekerOfTheWay
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Any chance you are using a smartphone to cache?

 

The app that I use I can pull up the logs. The notes, needs maintenance , published logs all come up as Did Not Find on the app. Not sure why. So I see a note listed as a DNF, but I realize it now that it's just the app listing it that way.

 

I use a BlackBerry. Might be the same with iPhone and Droid. Just a thought.

 

Example: Here I left a note saying I'm dropping a TB off. On the cache page it's listed as note of course. In the BlackBerry app it shows as a DNF:

utf-8BQ2FwdHVyZTdfMTlfNDIuanBn.jpg

 

Reviewer Notes get turned into DNF on the app too:

utf-8BQ2FwdHVyZTdfMjBfMS5qcGc.jpg

 

I have left notes for my hides BEFORE the cache was published. In this case, if you use a smartphone to cache, you'll see my note as a DNF before the Published log.

 

Wow. That seems like an annoying pain it the posterior.

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Any chance you are using a smartphone to cache?

 

The app that I use I can pull up the logs. The notes, needs maintenance , published logs all come up as Did Not Find on the app. Not sure why. So I see a note listed as a DNF, but I realize it now that it's just the app listing it that way.

 

I use a BlackBerry. Might be the same with iPhone and Droid. Just a thought.

I have left notes for my hides BEFORE the cache was published. In this case, if you use a smartphone to cache, you'll see my note as a DNF before the Published log.

 

Wow. That seems like an annoying pain it the posterior.

 

Not anymore. I can tell by the content of the log if it's a DNF, note, needs maintain etc.

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If I hit GZ and don't find a cache around, then I log a DNF. I have one cache I've tried twice - once I was run off by heavy rain, the next time the stepping stones over the creek were under 6 inches of water and I'm a GIRL - I didn't log either of those visits because I was nowhere near GZ.

 

So I guess my personal rule is if I get to GZ at all, then I'll think about logs, be they finds or not.

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We log DNF's all the time. You can't find them all. If you go out and search and do not find the cache for whatever reason it's a dnf. Make a funny log on how you couldn't find the cache and try again later. I've logged a dnf on a new cache a few times. On another note dnf serve a purpoe for the CO to maybe check on the cache as well. We have over 175 dnf's. No shame in a DNF. Just have to try again. :rolleyes:

 

Agreed! Although when I post a DNF log I'm a bit down that I didn't find it. But when I go back to re-read the DNF (usually after I've found it later) it is pretty funny.

 

I hope at least my DNF pain makes the CO (or other seekers) laugh. Sigh.

 

DNF D1 T1

DNF and got lost

Edited by SeekerOfTheWay
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That was entertaining. I wish we had a local like that!

 

:rolleyes: Be that local.

 

I can't. Anyone calling my hide a lame turd would hurt my feelings! lol.

 

There's no caches around here that have that conversation style note posting in them. I like that!

 

Not if you designed it to be that way.

 

That cache was a bit unusual in that way. It is not normally a good idea to have that kind of conversation on the cache page but it fits in that particular case.

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...

Am I crazy? Is it acceptable form to do this, or is it better to give it a few tries before you report a DNF?

...

 

I think it's totally acceptible on the first attempt.

 

In the past, I've even logged a DNF when I couldn't start seeking because of something like high muggle activity. DNF is simply the header--it's assumed that the log entry itself will explain the DNF, from "Looked for 20 minutes and this one's just eluding me" to "I couldn't even attempt to seek it because of high muggle activity near GZ."

 

DNFs are very useful to cache owners in that repeated DNF's can signal the owner that the Difficulty rating may be too low (and to increase it a tick or two) or that sometimes, a cache has just gone missing and the only way that the CO will find out is to review recent DNF activity.

 

DNF's are also very helpful to other seekers. There are a number of 2.5-3.5* caches in the vicinity that have several repeat-DNF'ers and then finally a find from that seeker. That alerts me to expect that I'm probably not going to find this one on the first shot, or maybe even the second. Great for setting expectations.

 

DNF simply means "did not find"---it has nothing (generally) to do with the quality of the cache itself--it's simply a public admission that I was unable to hunt for or to find a particular cache. It also serves a purpose to me, in that I can quickly pull up my own DNF's and re-search for caches I've previously attempted.

 

In short, never be hesitant to log a DNF, especially when you've actually spent time trying to find the cache--for the most part, they're helpful to yourself and to others.

 

-Dan

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Our family is new to geocaching (just under 100 found since June),
Welcome!

 

but I've noticed something odd. Lately I've twice noticed people logging DNFs on caches that just got placed and published. I saw two last week where before there was even an FTF, someone or several someones had logged it as a DNF.
There's nothing odd about that. If I get to ground zero and search for the cache, then I log either a Find or a DNF. As you can tell from this thread, I'm not the only one.

 

Another recent incident was when someone logged a DNF while writing in the log entry that they didn't even have their GPS with them, had not looked at the location prior to going, etc.
I haven't seen this particular log, but I found hundreds of caches before I bought a GPS receiver. I logged a few DNFs back then too, including multiple DNFs on a single cache at times.

 

Our family has an unspoken rule: we don't log a DNF until we've tried it 2-3 times with serious, serious effort! It almost seems like bad "etiquette" to log a DNF on a cache that:

 

1. just got published and hasn't even got a FTF yet

2. you admittedly didn't look too hard for or admittedly didn't look properly.

There are 5-star hides that have dozens of DNFs before the FTF. There's nothing wrong with posting a DNF on a cache that hasn't been found yet. There's nothing wrong with posting a DNF on a cache that you plan to search for again, or that you could have searched for more thoroughly. All a DNF means is that you Did Not Find the cache. No more, no less.
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Interesting responses! I've learned a lot from a different perspective. I'm pretty sure we'll still continue to give something at least two tries before we log it DNF (that golden rule that DNFU mentioned), but I'll be sure not to let it bug me when I see them in the future!

Hopefully as you age into the game you will start to be more forthcoming with your DNF logs. I log all of my DNFs and hope others do as well. A DNF means that I did not find the cache. Nothing more and nothing less. If I hunt for a cache and do not find it I feel I am deceiving myself, the cache owner and future hunters if I do not log my experience, be it a find or a DNF. Do what you believe feels right at the time. :D

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Our family is new to geocaching (just under 100 found since June), but I've noticed something odd. Lately I've twice noticed people logging DNFs on caches that just got placed and published. I saw two last week where before there was even an FTF, someone or several someones had logged it as a DNF.

 

Another recent incident was when someone logged a DNF while writing in the log entry that they didn't even have their GPS with them, had not looked at the location prior to going, etc.

 

Our family has an unspoken rule: we don't log a DNF until we've tried it 2-3 times with serious, serious effort! It almost seems like bad "etiquette" to log a DNF on a cache that:

 

1. just got published and hasn't even got a FTF yet

2. you admittedly didn't look too hard for or admittedly didn't look properly.

 

Am I crazy? Is it acceptable form to do this, or is it better to give it a few tries before you report a DNF? It probably doesn't matter, but that's our rule because we don't want to give the impression that the cache is the one with the problem when chances are it is us with the problem! LOL.

 

If I looked for it and didn't find it, I log a DNF. Because I didn't find it when I looked. Doesn't matter how prepared I was (if I was underprepared, I will note that in my log as a possible reason). Cache owners often rely on DNF logs to hint that maybe something might be wrong with the cache. If a cache gets a string of DNF's, the owner might schedule a visit to check on it. I logged a DNF on a cache recently that hadn't been found (no logs of any type) in more than a year. The GPS sent me to a location near to an area that looked like it had been through a forest fire within the past year. I noted in my log that I looked, and didn't find it. Then I described the conditions I found. I just noticed today that the cache owner paid a visit to the site recently and found that the cache was a victim of said fire and archived it. My DNF helped the cache owner find a problem.

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It almost seems like bad "etiquette" to log a DNF on a cache that:

 

1. just got published and hasn't even got a FTF yet

2. you admittedly didn't look too hard for or admittedly didn't look properly.

Well, my last DNF was on a cache that had zero finds, and I didn't even make it to Ground Zero. I think not posting a DNF would have been negligent. The only log that would have been more appropriate is a "Needs Archived" but at the time, we weren't sure the coords were right.
icon_sad.gifOctober 22 by Too Tall John (2043 found)

 

Out caching with Hipointer today. I saw this one had popped up while I was getting ready to go, so I loaded up the coords in case we might want to stop by. Hipointer was sure the Trail Mongers wouldn't come this far out of their way for a FTF, but who was there as we pulled up? The Trail Mongers!

 

They had already been looking & had actually just emailed the cache owner about the "Posted" signs that were everywhere. We chatted for a while and I made a quick search of some of the possible spots on our side of the posted signs. No luck.

 

We didn't let this stop us, though, we went on to have a great caching day, I found a total of 31 caches!

d5a02c6c-ea4c-430f-9b2b-8141036a5e93.jpg

3 Posted signs circled in red, GPSs seemed to bee pointing towards the green arrow

The pic was part of the log. This was a first time hide for the cache owner, who archived the cache, saying
traffic_cone.gifOctober 23 by TeamCache (25 found)

 

Posted Signs on property. We didn't see anything that said No Trespassing or Private Property so we thought it would be a good place to hide one.

Sadly, Trespassing is, in fact, specifically mentioned as something that shouldn't be done on Private Property in these signs. :D

gemplers-posted-sign-VYPS.jpg

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Our family is new to geocaching (just under 100 found since June), but I've noticed something odd. Lately I've twice noticed people logging DNFs on caches that just got placed and published. I saw two last week where before there was even an FTF, someone or several someones had logged it as a DNF.

 

Another recent incident was when someone logged a DNF while writing in the log entry that they didn't even have their GPS with them, had not looked at the location prior to going, etc.

 

Our family has an unspoken rule: we don't log a DNF until we've tried it 2-3 times with serious, serious effort! It almost seems like bad "etiquette" to log a DNF on a cache that:

 

1. just got published and hasn't even got a FTF yet

2. you admittedly didn't look too hard for or admittedly didn't look properly.

 

Am I crazy? Is it acceptable form to do this, or is it better to give it a few tries before you report a DNF? It probably doesn't matter, but that's our rule because we don't want to give the impression that the cache is the one with the problem when chances are it is us with the problem! LOL.

 

Just because you didn't find the cache doesn't necessary mean it's not there. You are simply recording your attempt. No shame with logging a DNF. It's all part of the hunt/fun.

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As for the DNF question, I always log a DNF if i looked and did not find. Even if i looked for only 5 minutes. As a CO i know that I like to be alerted of my caches activity, and possible issues.

 

As a cache owner I agree with you. I don't care if you looked for an hour, or a minute, I'd still like to hear about it if you didn't find it.

 

I've heard many excuses for not logging DNFs, including the OP's.

 

Say my cache goes missing. Cacher A hunts it and can't find it, but doesn't log a DNF because he didn't make a "serious, serious effort". Cacher B goes after it and fails, but doesn't log a DNF because he's new and maybe "it's just him", Cacher C takes a shot and comes up empty and doesn't log a DNF because he plans to return. Cacher D looks and doesn't find it, and won't log a DNF because he doesn't want to look foolish. Finally Cacher F doesn't find it and logs a DNF.

 

As a cache owner I only know about 1 DNF, but there were actually 5. 1 DNF usually won't cause me to check on my cache, but a string of them certainly will. Since that string of DNFs has yet to develop I will delay checking on it and more people will waste their time looking for a cache that isn't there.

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Ummmm,you look, you don't find, what else do you need to log a DNF? That is exactly what happend, you didn't find it, so you log it! There has only been one I didn't log, that we parked, I got out and my 3 year old screamed bloody murder that she was starving, so we didn't actually look, but we were there, I do know some post those as well, but I figured if I didn't even start, then it didn't matter LOL There was one that a guy posted a DNF, "I drove by this one at 55 mph and had no where to turn around so I will be back later"

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Oh, another cache I went for a FTF on had been published on the 22nd of the month (we'll call it "Marchuary "). As of the morning of Marchuary 25, there were no logs on it. Hipointer & I went for it, but came up empty, the coords brought us to a bit of woods with no visible sign of the feature mentioned in the description or hints. When we got home from our cache run, there was a rash of logs:

icon_sad.gifMarchuary 25 by XXXXXX

 

kid & dog in tow... we hiked out this morning, happy for a new cache nearby... thank goodness we brought the bug nets for over our heads!! unfortunately.. didn't find this one. got to ground zero and looked and looked and looked. no luck at all. even using the hint - looked in areas specific to the hint. still no luck!! headed home for some lunch. may go back later today and try again....

Followed by a note from the owner:
icon_note.gif Marchuary 25 by YYYYYY

 

After reading the log from XXXXXX went out this morning to check on cache. Updated the coordinates. See short description. Refined hint too. :anitongue:

Then, came the finds:
icon_smile.gifMarchuary 25 by XXXXXX

 

came back this afternoon, used updated coords N43.12.345 and W70.54.321 as noted and came with in 30 ft. the bugs were too much for me to figure out how to mark my own coords, hubby & kiddo were leaving me behind, heading back to the truck. Anyway, this time we were able to find and sign the log. our hint is "look for the unusually placed rock" Thanks for the cache!

But then, read on:
icon_smile.gifMarchuary 25 by ZZZZZZ

 

Took two tries to find this one. After getting the corrected cordinates we were able to make a speedy find. And I do mean speedy we strang out of the sleigh . . . practically running between the barns hoping to be TFTF. It was a relief to make the find after spending a lot of time in the wrong area earlier. Oh, rat's we were a little late with TFTF but it was a find!I left a Dog Guardian Angel and took a blue whistle. Once again we had a feeling of accomplishment.SL TFTC

icon_smile.gifMarchuary 25 by VVVVVV

 

3rd time is a charm 2nd to find on third try would have been first with the right gps cord. quick find took caribiner left hedgehog and santa tftc

I was quite ticked off that people had been DNFing this for 2 full days without posting their logs. We had driven half an hour out of our way to try and nab this lingering FTF opportunity, and then spent 45 mins searching for the cache, which was nowhere near where we were searching. In my DNF log, I commended XXXXXX for posting a DNF and YYYYYY for fixing it so quickly, but mentioned that ZZZZZZ and VVVVVV had wasted everyone's time by not posting their DNFs.

 

YYYYYY then deleted my DNF log. :D

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I almost always log a DNF each time I search and do not find. My only exception is if my searching is cut short due to a non-caching reason, and I didn't feel like I gave enough effort. (e.g. I just start to search and I get a call to come home urgently). But this rarely happens, usually I search until my internal "that's enough" meter goes off, then I log a DNF.

 

To the OP; there is no bad "etiquette in logging DNFs. I've logged DNFs on caches which had not yet been found.

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