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Do you log your DNF


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What are your feelings on logging a did not find? I know there have been people who have looked for some of my hides and it took more than one try to find but did not log a DNF. i know i am guilty of not logging all of my DNF mostly because i forget to. i guess its just another case of ethics and being that you are basically on an honor system threes not a whole lot you can do about it. i think that if you attempt to find any cache and dont sign the log (for any reason) you should log a DNF.

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I've logged three DNFs on the same cache, which happens to be the one closest to home. I was pretty sure it was missing after the first try, but I went back anyway. Now I'm really sure it's missing as several others have logged DNFs as well, making 8 consecutive DNFs over 9 months. DNFs are a bunch of things to many people, but when several string together they become a message to the CO and/or Reviewer that some attention is required. If one makes an honest effort to find a cache and DNFs, that report can be a help to the game only if logged.

 

Cheers!

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What are your feelings on logging a did not find? I know there have been people who have looked for some of my hides and it took more than one try to find but did not log a DNF. i know i am guilty of not logging all of my DNF mostly because i forget to. i guess its just another case of ethics and being that you are basically on an honor system threes not a whole lot you can do about it. i think that if you attempt to find any cache and dont sign the log (for any reason) you should log a DNF.

 

I usually log dnfs. I used to assume that most people do too, but the other day someone all but reprimanded those of us who had dnfed a particular cache. After thinking about it more, either I am a terrible cacher (possibly the case) or others are not logging dnfs. I'd sure like to hear from others about this.

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What are your feelings on logging a did not find? I know there have been people who have looked for some of my hides and it took more than one try to find but did not log a DNF. i know i am guilty of not logging all of my DNF mostly because i forget to. i guess its just another case of ethics and being that you are basically on an honor system threes not a whole lot you can do about it. i think that if you attempt to find any cache and dont sign the log (for any reason) you should log a DNF.
I log a DNF when I did not find the cache and I admit defeat. That is not even close to being unethical in my book.
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I log all my DNF's. Yeah I take some guff about them, I don't see a DNF as a bad mark. I see it as hey I looked for the cache, couldn't find it, hopefully next time, I'll have better luck. Not a sign of "skill" or lack of.

 

Heck some of my DNF's story's are better than my find story's and some get quite enjoyment hearing about them.

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I think it is important to log DNF's as part of the social contract between cachers and hiders.

 

If you get a DNF on your hide you know to keep an eye on it, more than one and I would suspect muggle activity. Of course this all depends on the difficulty of the cache, one DNF of a 5 star would perhaps make me (If I owned any 5 star caches) send a message to the DNFer to see if they had the spot (without giving it away of course) and maybe give them a little hint for the next time. If they describe the exact spot with no cache then you can suspend your cache and save others the wasted journey.

 

I think it only polite to log DNFs, had a few myself (61 finds, 6 DNF's only 1 of which was missing) mostly when we were a bit greener. Now we don't look at the hint till we have had a hunt around.

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Different people have different standards for logging DNF. If I did not start searching because of muggles, or never made it to GZ, I do not log a DNF. If I've started searching, I will, even if it is a 2 minute search. I typically do not log multiple DNFs.

 

Other than an indication of potential problem, and as your personal log, a DNF also serves to tell the cache owner that there are those interested in their cache, even if they did not manage to find it.

Edited by Chrysalides
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Please keep in mind you're asking folks on a forum, who represent only a very small percentage of the caching community....and of those who answer, you're sure to hear all the 'highly moral & righteous' answers, & even some few excuses.

 

But if ya wanta know the ugly truth, just plant a particularly difficult cache in a place that will show the signs of foot (& other) traffic -- somewhere that's convenient for you to re-visit on at least a weekly or shorter frequency. Then just compare the destruction that develops around 'Ground Zero' to the DNFs filed on your cache.

 

This li'l experiment should also serve as a lesson on where (& not) to place a cache, for future reference.

Also keep in mind, in some areas cachers are better about filing their DNFs....but in general, I believe my posit pretty much holds water.

~*

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If I look I log.

 

Most of the time my DNF logs are more fun to write. Then you get those pesky multiple DNFs. You write a log for each one, then one day you screw up and make the find! Oh how much fun is it to finally tie each story into a great conclusion.

 

But I also find it fun to write a story for each and every find I make. From the Nano to the ultra huge caches every one of them gets it's own individual story.

 

Not that I want to waste the cache owners time with a story, but in my logs I talk about the weather, the search, the people who cache with me, as well as the condition of the cache.

 

I'm sure there are people who see my name on their caches, sigh, and skip over the log, but there are others who write me e-mails thanking me for the fun logs. As long as I get more fan mail than hate mail I will keep logging the way I do.

 

Just remember what ever you do, you need to have fun with it.

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If I look I log.

 

Most of the time my DNF logs are more fun to write. Then you get those pesky multiple DNFs. You write a log for each one, then one day you screw up and make the find! Oh how much fun is it to finally tie each story into a great conclusion.

 

But I also find it fun to write a story for each and every find I make. From the Nano to the ultra huge caches every one of them gets it's own individual story.

 

Not that I want to waste the cache owners time with a story, but in my logs I talk about the weather, the search, the people who cache with me, as well as the condition of the cache.

 

I'm sure there are people who see my name on their caches, sigh, and skip over the log, but there are others who write me e-mails thanking me for the fun logs. As long as I get more fan mail than hate mail I will keep logging the way I do.

 

Just remember what ever you do, you need to have fun with it.

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If I am in the general area and I select a cache stored on my GPS and then select "goto". I have begun a search for that cache. If it ends with me not finding the cache. Then I am going to log a DNF.

 

Logging a DNF is not declaring the cache is missing or that there is neccissarily a problem. It is a simple fact. I see many cachers say they will only log a DNF if they "have given a good search". Isn't a DNF thats says I only looked 10 minutes going to convey that you may need to spend more then 10 minutes to another cacher??

 

I frequently see logs on my caches that say something like "finally found it on my 4th try" and yet I see no DNF logs (at all) on that cache. Don't you think it would help other cachers and the owner if we log all of our experiences?

 

...just sayin.

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While I don't log every DNF, I do log most. The one I dont log is when I'm out caching blind, no hints no clues didn't read the cache page because we're doing well lets get this one over here while we're at it. I'll write down the cache in my logbook go back review the page. If I read the page and clues and I should have found it I'll log the DNF if there's a spate of DNF's I'll log the DNF so the cache owner will go check it.

 

Any puzzle that I do, I'll log a DNF on and use a lifeline too.

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Like most people are saying, if I look but don't find, I try to remember to log a DNF on it. I'm sure I've missed one or two, and there were a couple I didn't find because I was rushed by the wife and only had a couple of minutes to look, so I didn't really count those as a DNF. I did go back the next day and gave them each an honest search, and found them. But currently, i think my stats are 34 Finds and 15 DNFs, and I'm perfectly OK with that. This isn't school, and it's not a grade, just a record of the past.

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What are your feelings on logging a did not find? I know there have been people who have looked for some of my hides and it took more than one try to find but did not log a DNF. i know i am guilty of not logging all of my DNF mostly because i forget to. i guess its just another case of ethics and being that you are basically on an honor system threes not a whole lot you can do about it. i think that if you attempt to find any cache and dont sign the log (for any reason) you should log a DNF.

As I have stated many times before I always log all my DNFs religiously, and I put even more tender loving care (TLC) into the log entry than I do into my find logs. On the other hand, my wife Sue, with whom I share a geo account, seems to be somewhat less conscientious than me about logging DNFs, and she does not tend to put as much TLC into them.

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Yes, We log all our DNF's. I don't see how some people can forget them & remember the finds?? You remember the cache no matter if you found it or not.

If when we get home & I start logging our finds & DNF's & I see like 2 or 3 DNF's before me & I will add a Maintenance Log after our DNF Log.

Got some nasty looking Log's from the owner of one not long ago cause they lived about 4 hours from a cache near us & said they wasn't going to run down here to check on it cause of a few DNF's. (4 DNF's in 4 months & That not counting maybe the people to chicken to say they couldn't find it,,lol) then they come check on it & Archived it cause they couldn't find it,,,lmao

But Yes, We Log each & Every DNF's if we get out the van or car & look, even if for a second.

If we don't get out the van or car because of Muggles or don't like the looks of things,etc,etc We then log a note why we didn't even start looking.

Being owners of 52 caches we love to see finds,DNF's notes about our caches. We got them in 3 States here & If I see just a 1 DNF or a note because of something in the area changed we go check on it the next day or within a weeks time.

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Once I searched for a particularly difficult hide, did not find it, went for lunch, came back later that day and searched for it again, and found it. There was no chance to log in between the two searches (on the same day), and I did not look for any other caches in between either. Should I have logged a DNF followed immediately by a Found It? That's how I would interpret the guidelines strictly, but it seems like a waste of time (mine and the readers) and electrons. I merely logged the find. Would anyone have handled it differently?

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If I get out of the cachemobile at all, I log the DNF. If I drive by and find that there are way too many muggles at that location at the time, and I never even start the hunt, then I do not.

 

I love logging the DNFs, because then i can go back through my own cache logs, and look for new logs on that hide that might provides new clues....

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Always log a DNF.

Log'em everytime you got to the location and looked, without finding.

Logging a find is your reward for a successful hunt,

while logging a DNF is your contribution to the rest of the caching community.

A DNF helps other cachers know if the cache is still viable or not.

and it helps the owner know if something might be wrong with the cache.

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Logging a find is your reward for a successful hunt, while logging a DNF is your contribution to the rest of the caching community. A DNF helps other cachers know if the cache is still viable or not, and it helps the owner know if something might be wrong with the cache.

Actually, it is reasoning like this that leads some beginners to not log DNFs. They're (I was) afraid that logging a DNF might give a false impression there is a problem with the cache, when it is very possible they're (I'm) just not experienced or lucky enough to find it.

 

I've since learned that one (or two, or even 10) DNF does not a missing cache make - though you have to figure out the odds yourself by reading the logs in detail.

 

And logging a find is also a service in addition to a reward, because it tells everyone interested it is still there on a certain date. It's also nice if the log contains something more than "TNLNSL, TFTC" but there's a separate, long thread on that...

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If I make a sincere effort to find a cache and don't, I log a DNF. If I'm just taking a quick look on the way to work, I don't.

 

I agree that logging a DNF, along with DNFs by different cachers *should* alert the CO to a problem, but sometimes they just figure they are that good at hiding them. Sadly, we have a few COs around here like that, although I suspect some of them simply replace a missing cache and indicate in the log it was not gone.

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I'm a newbie so totally unqualified to comment through experience - but via logic alone I would say there are several reasons why I would log a DNF:

1) so I have a personal record to compare with my successes - hopefully to show I get better over time

2) to let others know that the cache might be a little tricky i.e. if there are lots of other DNFs mixed with successes

3) to help flag up a possible missing cache to the owner

4) help to show the owner (and others) how many visits the cache is getting

 

...so, I would log a DNF on any occasion where I reached GZ and started an ultimately unsuccessful search - even if couldn't search for long (whether due to muggles/descending darkness/summoned home for dinner or whatever).

 

The only problem I can see with all this is that since there are several reasons why someone may log a DNF it may lead to confusion (particularly for the cache owner).

 

My answer...

 

When I log a DNF I would explain the situation in the log entry - eg

didn't search for long - will go back and try again one day

this is my 7th attempt and I don't plan to go back again

... or whatever.

 

If the owner sees the last 5/10/20/100 logs (there shines my lack of experience) were DNF with no finds at all, then a cache check might be needed.

 

That's all I have on the subject, I think.

 

Rather a lot to say for someone who doesn't know anything! :laughing: Thanks for humouring me anyway!

Edited by slartib
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Once I searched for a particularly difficult hide, did not find it, went for lunch, came back later that day and searched for it again, and found it. There was no chance to log in between the two searches (on the same day), and I did not look for any other caches in between either. Should I have logged a DNF followed immediately by a Found It? That's how I would interpret the guidelines strictly, but it seems like a waste of time (mine and the readers) and electrons. I merely logged the find. Would anyone have handled it differently?

 

No, that is exactly what I would have (and have) done. Wouldn't make any difference to me if were hard or easy. Wouldn't have made any difference if I found a cache in between. I guess I treat each day as one caching event. (But if the same had been two separate days, I would have a DNF on day 1 and a find on day 2.)

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Once I searched for a particularly difficult hide, did not find it, went for lunch, came back later that day and searched for it again, and found it. There was no chance to log in between the two searches (on the same day), and I did not look for any other caches in between either. Should I have logged a DNF followed immediately by a Found It? That's how I would interpret the guidelines strictly, but it seems like a waste of time (mine and the readers) and electrons. I merely logged the find. Would anyone have handled it differently?

 

No, that is exactly what I would have (and have) done. Wouldn't make any difference to me if were hard or easy. Wouldn't have made any difference if I found a cache in between. I guess I treat each day as one caching event. (But if the same had been two separate days, I would have a DNF on day 1 and a find on day 2.)

 

Who's to say when you've actually stopped searching & given up on a cache, other'n you? Nothing in the guidelines says anything about taking a break, nor when or where or how you spend the break time! I'd say some kind of balancing rationale - not one that provides some lame dodge - would need to come into play, & the 'day = session' is as good as any. (Opening the door for "but (spoken in a high-pitched, nasal whine) what if I camp overnight right beside it & resume my search the next morning" arguments from all our master debators.) :laughing:

 

DNFs serve several purposes. If logging one would not serve one of them, why waste the effort if it'd be meaningless? Bottom line - YOU know when you've given up & stopped looking, for this attempt....let your own conscience be your guide. You're the one who'll hafta suffer the guilt when you don't! :o

~*

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Wow, such lofty ideals and terms:ethical, defeat, social contract, politeness, contribution...

 

How about simply logging them because it is part of the cache history and my experience there? :laughing:

No shame, no pride, simply I was here and either I found it and signed the log, or I didn't.

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DNFs serve several purposes. If logging one would not serve one of them, why waste the effort if it'd be meaningless?

That makes perfect sense. Thank you.

 

On another note, I do wish there is an option to show my DNFs on the cache map page. Instead, I now see a box at the lower right that says "Sponsored Link" and it won't go away...

 

Edit : strange, it went away after I entered this post. Occult hand?

Edited by Chrysalides
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I wish that more people would log DNF if they don't find it after a hunt. It really helps out other cachers. Check out this cache: GCTWGJ. It's obviously in trouble. If people didn't log DNF, people would go all the way up there to look for this and not know something was up. What a total bummer! :laughing: Nothing that I hate worse than going all the way up someplace to look for something that isn't there. DNF can be helpful.

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When I first started I felt like a failure when I couldn't find my first cache and logged my DNF. It hurt so bad to do that so I didn't do it again! A little over dramatic but true! I've grown though after reading several threads about this subject and especially after I started hiding some of my own caches. Once I hid a cache I totally got the rush you get when someone finds your cache that you put a lot of thought into, and the "gotcha" when you get the DNF. Now I won't rob anyone of there derserved logs whether its a :o or :laughing: !

 

Logging DNF's only keep honest people honest!

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