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Repetitive Caches


zinger5656
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I have been caching for about 3 weeks now, and have already noticed too many similar cache types. Mostly of the urban variety. Stuff like micros in free town paper boxes, and micros under lamp pole skirts. There are too many of the same type, and it kind of takes the fun out of finding them because you know exactly where they are. Do you see common cache types in your area? If you do, what are they?

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I'm also tired of taking a long hike in the woods on a beautiful day and spotting the cache from 20 yards because it is under an obvious pile of sticks. :laughing:

 

Seriously-welcome to the addiction. There is lots of repetition because there are lots of caches out there, and not everyone is creative with each and every hide. I don't own lots of LPC's but I do own one-I like to think it's a little bit different than the others and people smile once they arrive on site though.

 

Also for some-the fun is in retrieving a cache from a high visibility area. If it was hard to find, it might draw too much attention to the hide and seeker.

 

Try to focus on finding caches that are on recommended bookmark lists. That should help filter the signal from the noise a little bit.

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I have been caching for about 3 weeks now, and have already noticed too many similar cache types. Mostly of the urban variety. Stuff like micros in free town paper boxes, and micros under lamp pole skirts. There are too many of the same type, and it kind of takes the fun out of finding them because you know exactly where they are. Do you see common cache types in your area? If you do, what are they?

 

This is the sport where "you are the search engine".

 

Once you have mastered the task of searching, and simply finding a cache, you must then expand your technique to searching to find which caches are unique and interesting.

 

This can best be done by reading all the logs of a cache. This may take up some time, but saves time in the long run from running out to places you would rather not go.

 

Another way is to look for bookmark lists of great caches and check them out.

Edited by 4wheelin_fool
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Ah ... urban caching. The bane of my existence. Okay, not really but it sounds all dramatic and stuff, doesn't it? While I don't generally enjoy urban caching ... or much of anything urban, for that matter, there are some good ones out there. Some people actually enjoy hiding caches and being creative about it, while for others, it's just about their total number of cache hides. I grew weary of the "let's-throw-a-piece-of-Rubbermaid-out-in-the-woods-and-toss-some-leaves-on-it-and-call-it-a-cache" syndrome we see so much of lately so I stopped looking for caches unless one comes up with a decent terrain and difficulty rating. Those are few and far between in my area.

 

This was an extremely creative cache. Hidden in plain sight in downtown Seattle, it was a prime example of what a little thought and creativity can accomplish.

Edited by ...The Girl
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I have very few finds under my belt(30) so far. But a couple were the light post skirt and a couple others that were similar. I now have 4 hides under my belt. While one is a level 1/1 because it was placed in a new park and is meant for families and kids, the other 3 have been 3/1 and one that is a 3/3.5. I have used my creativity to come up with things that will challenge most cachers. Although some guys and gals have been doing this fo a long time and it is hard to come up with stuff they have not seen. I want to come up with stuff that is different. If I place easy ones than I will let people know so they can take the kiddies. My boys do not like micros ( no treasure inside) so sometimes I will leave ones for the kids. I wish people would be more creative and not worry about quantity too. My only problem now is that a couple rather well known and well regarded cachers

have made some really complimentary comments about my hides and now I am under great pressure to at least improve on the future ones.

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Heh, I find that cache modification is more important with a well designed urban hide than one out in the woods. There is something quite satisfying about the knowledge that 100's of unsuspecting souls have walked past my cache every day, and perhaps looked right at it without any awareness that something wasn't quite right. :D

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... Do you see common cache types in your area? If you do, what are they?

 

They all seem to have a container and a log. That gets old. I'd like some to use DNA find verification technology with autologging of TFTC once I'm a verified premium member. But that's just a pipe dream. Beside the thought of having to touch a cache slimmed with other peoples DNA doesn't do much for me.

 

I'm also tired of waterfalls. They never put the cache in the cave behind them. It's always from a vantage point near them. They need to put them in, on, under, or behind the waterfall.

 

Caches should be harder to retrieve. they all seem to be "just grab the dang thing" when you find them. That's boring. They should put up a good fight like landing a salmon. Maybe an Indiana Jones style run for your life once you have it in hand. Wrestling a guy named Sven or a Greesed up Greek with a big grin would keep it interesting. You get the idea, the retrieve should be interesting as well.

 

Actually having to load up my gear, GPS, and the like is old. I want geocaching sherpa's to do it all for me.

 

There are other things but I guess I'll close with, I want to find caches placed by Famouse People. Then I could be a cache groupie. It may not be fun but it sounds better than finding a cache by someone called "spudman".

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I have been caching for about 3 weeks now, and have already noticed too many similar cache types. Mostly of the urban variety. Stuff like micros in free town paper boxes, and micros under lamp pole skirts. There are too many of the same type, and it kind of takes the fun out of finding them because you know exactly where they are. Do you see common cache types in your area? If you do, what are they?

 

I wasn't even going to read this, because I figured it would be a thread turned ugly really quick. :D But I see from your avatar I'm from your area. I can offer unique perspective on those "free town newspaper boxes". Yes, there are micros in free newspaper boxes elsewhere, but not over 50 of them, identically named, where a GPS isn't even required to find them, just glance at Mapquest and you got a smiley. They're pretty much the easiest caches in the whole world, and you won't find them anywhere else in the whole world.

 

I don't know, after 5 years and 1,500 caches, I pretty much see all the same things as far as hiding methods, even out in the woods. I guess I'm more in it for the adventure, and seeing new locations.

 

I looked at your finds. That guy's cache that you found in Como Park yesterday? He's pretty much about as creative as it gets around here. And I see you've found several of his already. There are other creative people around, but I'll email you, I don't want to be throwing people's names around (and boring people who aren't from our area).

Edited by TheWhiteUrkel
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If there were a cache every 528 feet all over the Earth then there would be about 200,000,000 caches.

Mostly water caches but I'd bet that 90% of the land ones would be LPC or guarded.

 

P.S. These numbers are a mental estimate based on PI=3 and the radius of the Earth as 4000 miles.

 

I don't have access to fizzy-calc right now but I wonder what the GC numnber of the last cache would be.

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We went through your area last week on vacation. I saw a lot of caches that looked very nice. I only wish we had more time to find some of them. We planned to find quite a few in your area, but we spent waaaay too much time (and had a wonderful time doing it) finding the earthcaches at Niagara Falls and getting a DNF on this one there. I highly suggest you do that cache. I bet there aren't many like it around.

 

And then, if I were you, I'd try hiding some clever and unique caches for others to find. If other people like your hides they will be inspired by them. That's really the only way to combat redundancy--show them what they are missing.

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Trick is to find the good ones.

 

Yep. Wish it was an easy skill.

 

Oh yeah, 'cuz reading and taking a moment to check the location on satellite view is soooo fweakin' harrrd. /sarcasm :D:D:D

 

I tend to research every cache before I try for it.

 

That's a lot of moments reading and choosing. Most of them I don't ever have the chance to try for.

 

(sorry the web posted that too soon)

 

Lately I've been driving over 500 miles a week. I never know when I can pull off the road. It'd be nice not to end up searching the local stuffmart when I do have the chance to do a small 1 hour hike.

 

So...like I said.

Edited by BlueDeuce
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I have been caching for about 3 weeks now, and have already noticed too many similar cache types. Mostly of the urban variety. Stuff like micros in free town paper boxes, and micros under lamp pole skirts. There are too many of the same type, and it kind of takes the fun out of finding them because you know exactly where they are. Do you see common cache types in your area? If you do, what are they?
Well, in our area we tend to have a lot of micros in free town paper boxes, and micros under lamp post skirts, nearly every bus stop in town, and oh yeah, can't forget the nanos stuck to the bottom of the benches. I think that's a common issue which is why I really like the full sized Lock-n-Lock hide I recently put out right in the busiest part of town amongst the micros and nanos :D

 

What it kind of boils down to is to hide the type of caches you'd like to find and hopefully they breed by inspiring other local cachers to follow suit when they see how much fun they are.

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***I'm also tired of waterfalls. They never put the cache in the cave behind them.***

 

Have you tried my "HorseShoe Falls cache"? You have to take the Maid of The Mist to the base of the Falls, then jump off. Then you have to swim under and to the back of the falls to reach the cave.

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My advice to the OP is if you feel that way after 3 weeks then get out of the city and do some scenic caches out in the country before you burn out on urbans.

Yeah...what TrailGators said...

.

.

.

Try to get a bit out of the area and do some caching...get a little variety in area and, many times, hide styles...

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Dont get me wrong, Ive had some really awsome caches. Ive covered two parks in my area and have had a lot of great expiriences. I'm not in any way trying to start a war, nor am I slowing down in discouragement. I love G-caching. I was wondering what other types of repetitive caches are out there. Not all urbans are bad either, this one (GC17QKH) Ive been to 3 times and still cannot find.

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***I'm also tired of waterfalls. They never put the cache in the cave behind them.***

 

Have you tried my "HorseShoe Falls cache"? You have to take the Maid of The Mist to the base of the Falls, then jump off. Then you have to swim under and to the back of the falls to reach the cave.

D'oh! I went over in a barrel three times before I was able to time the jump just right (talk about repetitive!). That way would have been a lot easier.

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I have been caching for about 3 weeks now, and have already noticed too many similar cache types. Mostly of the urban variety. Stuff like micros in free town paper boxes, and micros under lamp pole skirts. There are too many of the same type, and it kind of takes the fun out of finding them because you know exactly where they are. Do you see common cache types in your area? If you do, what are they?

I have been reading these forums for over 3 years now, and have already noticed too many similar forum threads. Mostly of the complaint variety. Stuff like repetitive caches, "lame" caches, micros, and specifically micros under lamp pole skirts. There are too many of the same thread type, and it kind of takes the fun out of reading them because you know exactly where they are. Do you see common forum threads in other forums? If you do, what are they?

 

 

Sorry. Couldn’t resist. :) I’m a baaaaaaad boy. I am now prepared to take my punishment.

 

Please carry on. This is a good thread, and I am enjoying reading it. :laughing:

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I have been caching for about 3 weeks now, and have already noticed too many similar cache types. Mostly of the urban variety. Stuff like micros in free town paper boxes, and micros under lamp pole skirts. There are too many of the same type, and it kind of takes the fun out of finding them because you know exactly where they are. Do you see common cache types in your area? If you do, what are they?

 

This has been the case in my area, but luckily, there are a couple of innovative hides to break the normal mediocrity ... one is beside a sewage dump site (very lovely - especially this time of year), and 'urinary track' (draw your own conclusions). Be careful what you wish for! :laughing:

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Ouch... that hurts.. way to slap a noob in the face. You've got to expect seeing similar posts over 3 years. Geocaching is a growing sport. And Noobs like me are going to post stupid things like this, I havn't seen any posts like this being that it was the first one I've ever done. Anyhoo I'd like to hear a good stealth story from you! Check out my other post on stealth techniques and share. :laughing:

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Ouch... that hurts.. way to slap a noob in the face. You've got to expect seeing similar posts over 3 years. Geocaching is a growing sport. And Noobs like me are going to post stupid things like this, I havn't seen any posts like this being that it was the first one I've ever done. Anyhoo I'd like to hear a good stealth story from you! Check out my other post on stealth techniques and share. :laughing:

Sorry. That wasn't directed at you. Wasn't really directed at anybody specific.

 

I was actually trying to make a serious point:

 

Threads like yours are extremely common for the very same reason that the caches you describe are extremely common.

 

You are correct – as a newbie, you have little experience, and it is therefore unreasonable and illogical for me or anyone to expect you to talk or act as if you have experience. Isn’t it, therefore, also perfectly reasonable for one to expect inexperienced cache hiders to hide somewhat repetitive hides?

 

Your post was perfectly reasonable. Doesn’t matter that many, many people before you have posted the very same thing. You didn’t know; you’re new. No problem. Isn’t it, therefore, also perfectly reasonable for one to expect newbie cache hiders to hide somewhat repetitive hides?

 

I sometimes enjoy the hides that others perceive as overly repetitive. I also sometimes enjoy the forum threads that fit the same description. Fact is, I regularly champion both: common hides AND repetitive opinions. I get beaten up regularly around here for daring to suggest tolerance over snobbish narrow-mindedness. Wanna see my scars?

 

I am not suggesting you are being unreasonable. Quite the contrary, in fact. Yours is one of the most levelheaded and least whiny posts on this topic I’ve ever seen. You didn’t call for any bans. You didn’t call for any rule changes. You didn’t claim your caching taste to be superior. You didn’t insult the caching preferences of others. You simply stated your own preference, and asked if anyone else’s experiences were similar. Very tolerant and mature – I respect that.

 

My post was an attempt to make a point via a weak attempt at irony. Sorta like this:

Ouch... that hurts.. way to slap a grumpy burnout in the face.
:)
You've got to expect seeing similar caches in three weeks. Geocaching is a growing sport, powered solely by amateurs, many of which are newbies. And newbies are going to place repetitive hides like the ones you’ve seen. I haven’t seen any posts quite like this being that yours was the first truly tolerant one I've ever read. Anyhoo I'd like to hear more good ideas from you! Ignore my other post, and carry on.

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This was an extremely creative cache. Hidden in plain sight in downtown Seattle, it was a prime example of what a little thought and creativity can accomplish.

The container:

7664e37f-673e-4416-92e1-a0c591b5e999.jpg

Hiding a micro only means you didn't try very hard to create something memorable.

Edited by Criminal
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I have been caching for about 3 weeks now, and have already noticed too many similar cache types. Mostly of the urban variety. Stuff like micros in free town paper boxes, and micros under lamp pole skirts. There are too many of the same type, and it kind of takes the fun out of finding them because you know exactly where they are. Do you see common cache types in your area? If you do, what are they?

 

I like that you are not happy with that sort of hide. You sound like a quality creative cache hider in the making. Go show them how it SHOULD be done!!

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This was an extremely creative cache. Hidden in plain sight in downtown Seattle, it was a prime example of what a little thought and creativity can accomplish.

The container:

 

Hiding a micro only means you didn't try very hard to create something memorable.

 

Yay me, I figuerd out the combination! :) It's _ _ _ ... :laughing:

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Another thing to keep in mind with these types of caches - In urban areas not all people have motor vehicles. They rely on public transportation, walking or riding a bike. If not for these caches they would not be able to participate. I hate LPC's and caches in high muggle areas myself. Being new myself I felt there were too many people around or they watching me so I would drive to out of the way caches in the parks and woods in rural areas.

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I have been caching for about 3 weeks now, and have already noticed too many similar cache types. Mostly of the urban variety. Stuff like micros in free town paper boxes, and micros under lamp pole skirts. There are too many of the same type, and it kind of takes the fun out of finding them because you know exactly where they are. Do you see common cache types in your area? If you do, what are they?

 

I wasn't even going to read this, because I figured it would be a thread turned ugly really quick. :laughing: But I see from your avatar I'm from your area. I can offer unique perspective on those "free town newspaper boxes". Yes, there are micros in free newspaper boxes elsewhere, but not over 50 of them, identically named, where a GPS isn't even required to find them, just glance at Mapquest and you got a smiley. They're pretty much the easiest caches in the whole world, and you won't find them anywhere else in the whole world.

 

I don't know, after 5 years and 1,500 caches, I pretty much see all the same things as far as hiding methods, even out in the woods. I guess I'm more in it for the adventure, and seeing new locations.

 

I looked at your finds. That guy's cache that you found in Como Park yesterday? He's pretty much about as creative as it gets around here. And I see you've found several of his already. There are other creative people around, but I'll email you, I don't want to be throwing people's names around (and boring people who aren't from our area).

 

Bore me, I'm coming to your area tomorrow through Wed.

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I have been caching for about 3 weeks now, and have already noticed too many similar cache types. Mostly of the urban variety. Stuff like micros in free town paper boxes, and micros under lamp pole skirts. There are too many of the same type, and it kind of takes the fun out of finding them because you know exactly where they are. Do you see common cache types in your area? If you do, what are they?

 

I wasn't even going to read this, because I figured it would be a thread turned ugly really quick. :) But I see from your avatar I'm from your area. I can offer unique perspective on those "free town newspaper boxes". Yes, there are micros in free newspaper boxes elsewhere, but not over 50 of them, identically named, where a GPS isn't even required to find them, just glance at Mapquest and you got a smiley. They're pretty much the easiest caches in the whole world, and you won't find them anywhere else in the whole world.

 

I don't know, after 5 years and 1,500 caches, I pretty much see all the same things as far as hiding methods, even out in the woods. I guess I'm more in it for the adventure, and seeing new locations.

 

I looked at your finds. That guy's cache that you found in Como Park yesterday? He's pretty much about as creative as it gets around here. And I see you've found several of his already. There are other creative people around, but I'll email you, I don't want to be throwing people's names around (and boring people who aren't from our area).

 

Bore me, I'm coming to your area tomorrow through Wed.

 

OMG! Don't find any of mine, I don't want it to get out that they're all 2 minute P&G's. :laughing:

 

Sending PM.

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Someone around here hid a series of urban caches called "Classics" - there was a newsrack hide, a bus stop bench nano hide, a lamppost hide, a fence post hide, and a fake electric plate.

 

Why are these hides "classics"? A successful geocache is one that cachers can find fairly easily, and that muggles won't find. These caches can last a long time with relatively little maintenance. If there is a DNF, the cache owner knows to go out an do maintenance right away since cachers shouldn't have trouble finding the cache unless there's a problem. So the cache is there to be found most of the time. The hider is happy and the finder is happy.

 

In non-urban areas you'll find the repetitive ammo can under sticks or rocks for the same reasons.

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You have a choice to search for caches you want to log and the choice to ignore the caches you know were they are hidden before you get there. Some cache owners may have a surprise for you on Urban Caches. Mainly this game is all about finding and signing the log book and seeing some wonderful vista's, visiting different towns, seeing and learning about American history, and so many more places that you have passed by hundreds of times and never stopped....That could include "smelling the roses"...Good luck and Happy Caching

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Chain link fence pole, under the cap or suspended by wire. Sprinkler control box. Fake sprinkler head. DNA tube in a street sign. Tiny bison tubes, camo'd, in pine trees.

 

I think that the challenge in an urban cache is how large can you make it and can you put a smile on the face. Decorate the container, etc.

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Just got this log on easily my most scenic cache..... http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_detai...42-0255b81c983a

 

Log Date: 7/26/2008

This was our first cache find, now my wife is hooked!

 

I think they best stay away from cities or caching could be rapidly downhill from there.......

 

e1c88c44-f77d-417c-9149-4a61cd01b4a9.jpg

 

Take a wild guess where the 50 cal ammo box cache is hidden???

 

UMMMM, 50 feet below the summit of the mountain peak in the distance?

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