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The lost art of logging


9Key
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I've been trying to write more lately, especially when care has been taken in placing it. Some caches have special meaning for the owner, and when done well, can also have special meaning for the finder. I don't do a lot of finds all at once; one or two that will take me somewhere special are about all I'm interested in most days, and I want the owner to know that a great cache is the best therapy money can't buy.

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On every log, I start with basic information (# x of y for the day; z total. Found at a with b,c,d while caching e." After that, I add what I find relevant to the cache. Sometimes, it's a simple "Found easily," but usually a little more. If it was a great cache, whether the hide or hike, I make sure I write more. Like others, I try to give the cache owner as much as they put into it. If the cache needs to be attended to (wet inside, log almost full, etc), I make sure to note that in the log as well.

 

 

I have to admit that I wasn't always this way. After placing some caches, most with puzzles involved, I got tired of the "TFTC" run through them. It seemed to me that if you take the time to solve the puzzle, you could take a little more to write about it. I then began seeing it through the owner's side. Since then, I've made sure I write *something* about the cache, even the easy ones.

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(# x of y for the day; z total)

 

I see this quite often and I certainly understand people wanting to share how many caches they've found that day, especially when it's an achievement. 13 in one day is my record.

 

Sometimes that's it for the log. I'd rather see TNLNSL.

 

I took the vow, and after finding a couple caches today I'm going to take a few minutes and write a log that is reasonably worth reading.

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... but personally, I can't do copy and paste logs. It just feels cheap.

 

I get a lot of emails about my logs. Some from owners who appreciate the detail I put into them and others from cachers who enjoy reading them.

 

Honestly, for me, a BIG part of the enjoyment of caching is in logging my finds.

 

And other than that, I just get a lot of pleasure in telling a good story.

 

 

Amen, brother.

 

I look forward to logging caches online almost as much as I look forward to seeking them out. For instance, when I was in Indiana recently visiting family, I completed IndyMagicMan's "A Little Indy Magic" series in just one day (with the exception of one I did the afternoon before due to the forecast of rain). I spent about 3 hours composing the logs for those 11 caches. I had as much fun doing that as I did finding them!

Edited by Western_Mass_Clan
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(# x of y for the day; z total)

 

I see this quite often and I certainly understand people wanting to share how many caches they've found that day, especially when it's an achievement. 13 in one day is my record.

 

Sometimes that's it for the log. I'd rather see TNLNSL.

 

I took the vow, and after finding a couple caches today I'm going to take a few minutes and write a log that is reasonably worth reading.

I don't have too many caches on which people leave the "# x of y for the day" log, but I agree that TNLNSL would be better if that is all the log consists of . . . :blink:

 

Even when I recently found a cache that might be classified as a "DPM," my log contained more than 50 words. :) I wrote unique logs (no cut and paste) about that length for each of the fifteen caches I visited that day. :)

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I usually try to write an interesting log, and I am very sensitive to the fact that my most avid reader will be the owner of the cache.

 

Usually, I first sit down and write something in my yellow note-book. Then I edit it briefly before I transcribe it into the cache log.

 

At the end of the day, I have fairly good notes that I can use as a basis for the on-line log. Sometimes I get new insights while doing the on-line part.

 

One of my rewards for this extra little effort is that, as I look back and re-read many of my logs over the four years I have been caching, I am often able to recapture some of the spirit and fun of the cache.

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I usually try to write an interesting log, and I am very sensitive to the fact that my most avid reader will be the owner of the cache.

 

Usually, I first sit down and write something in my yellow note-book. Then I edit it briefly before I transcribe it into the cache log.

 

At the end of the day, I have fairly good notes that I can use as a basis for the on-line log. Sometimes I get new insights while doing the on-line part.

 

One of my rewards for this extra little effort is that, as I look back and re-read many of my logs over the four years I have been caching, I am often able to recapture some of the spirit and fun of the cache.

 

GSAK hasa macro that will order your found caches by the longest logs. I've done this to read through the more enjoyable caches that I've found. :)
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I'd like to see examples of logs that are really good.

 

I was at an event last month, and when I introduced myself to some cachers, they said "you are the one that writes those really good logs".

I was very proud and happy to hear this. I like writing logs, I like to write stuff about my day and have people pay attention. I have had trouble condensing my log to fit within the 4000 character limit.

 

I totally agree that I write much more detailed logs for caches that are especially fun.

 

Here is a portion of one of my latest logs for a very cool multicache:

Hillside Cache

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pre-cache

I tried a few runfrog caches. It seams that Mr. R.U. nfrog and I have different ways of thinking about geocaching. I like a little walk in the woods with a nice prize at the end. He likes to be exposed to every possible challenge in the woods and get a little tube at the end with more coordinates to another equally nasty place to find. Why I like his caches - I don’t know. But I do know that I have trouble with them, so I’ve enlisted help for this one. When I saw that Gregwein had successfully done several of runfrog’s caches lately, and that he likes to take pruning sheers and make trails where thorns used to be, I asked if he wanted to do this one together. We decided to meet at 8am.

 

7:18am

The cache owner is currently in Albequircky, at a frog reunion or something, but since he generously gives out his cell phone number in the cache description, I gave him a friendly ‘Hiya’ text to make sure he was ready to hear our whines and pleas for help. He texted back that it is 5:19am where he is and he is going back to sleep. Oops, now that I’ve disrupted the frogs sleep, I hope I haven’t ruined my chances for help with the cache.

 

Parking Lot

We haven’t even started the cache yet, and have to make a decision already. Where to park??? Two spots, both about the same distance from Stage 1. After much debate I picked Parking #2. This ended up being the right choice. I suggest you take a cooler, fill it with frosty cool beverages and perhaps a grill with some burgers since you will pass this parking lot several times when doing this cache. Plus, it takes all day, so you may get hungry.

 

Stage 1 ‘Dead’

The phrase ‘Needle in a Haystack’ applies here. We learned that two GPS’s can be next to each other, and have readings that are up to 300 feet different. Who knew?

I was totally ready for the stream crossing with my watershoes, and my inflatable rowboat with oars, but alas, we didn’t need it because there was just a trickle of water in the stream bed today. It was just a hop across. Does that lower the terrain? If so, it was a terrential water forge and I needed Greg to throw me the life jacket and I had to use my scuba oxygen tank just to stay alive.

Around GZ, the GPS would say 35 feet with 40ft accuracy, or 10 feet with 60ft accuracy, occasionally one of us would get to 10 feet, or 6 feet, but never in the same area. We kicked, shoved and moved around every stick, leaf, log, tree, plant, rock and dead animal and found nothing. Then when walking in yet another circle, there it was – laying in the open. We must have made it a projectile somehow. I’m not really sure how. Or maybe runfrog pressed his magic button that made it ‘appear’. Who knows? I did the happy dance and we moved on.

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another thought....

 

If I don't have much to say about the cache, I like to write about the area where the cache is located.

 

Here is a log from another recent cache:

Beach of Sore Eyes Cache

 

I have been watching this new cache every day, thinking that it would be found. With the onset of new caches in the last few days, this one is buried off of the main page, but still not found. Today I had some free time, and there is no FTF yet, so off I went...

In 1988, the song 'Get out of my life and into my car' by Rick Ashley was playing on the radio. As that song was playing, my boyfriend proposed to me on this very beach.

Well, that didn't work out too well, but this FTF did.

After the DNREC guy left, I was alone at the beach today on an overcast, breezy 65 degree summer day. There are several million places to hide a cache in this location, and I looked in many of them before finding the cache. I was wondering weather all the rain we had may have washed the cache away. I was wondering what was going through debjoey's head hiding a cache here. I was wishing I hadn't found it yet so I could spend some more time here! It was very relaxing being out here with the water and the birds.

TN, Left $1,000,000.00. Thanks to DebJoey for the cache!

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very last thought (OK, I like to write!)...

 

There is a series of caches in Virginia that are simple mostly guardrail micros off the interstate. They are called JOE (Just off Interstate). I did eight of these in one day. There really wasn't much to write about, but as I was driving I started 'talking' to the next JOE cache. My logs are below. I got a very nice email from the cache owner saying he loved the logs. That made my day.

 

Here are my logs:

 

JOE,

It has been very nice meeting you today. You are very easy to get along with and bring me much joy. I hope to see more JOE's today.

JQ

 

JOE,

Wow, you sure get around; this is our second meeting today. I have enjoyed finding you again, and I am happy you have changed a bit since our earlier meeting. I wouldn’t like it if you were the same every time we met.

JQ

 

JOE,

Our third meeting today, and I am still happy to be finding you! You bring excitement to my life! Plucked you off, did my thing, and put you back. Easy!

JQ

 

JOE,

This is the forth time we have crossed path’s today, I hope you don’t think I’m stalking you. I just enjoy your company. TFTC!

JQ.

 

JOE,

Yipee, you are one reliable, steady friend. This is our fifth meeting today, you are easy to find and I have enjoyed you every time!

JQ

 

JOE,

Now that we have met six times, I feel it is time to come clean with you. I enjoy other, more fruitful types much better, but I am enjoying you today.

JQ

 

JOE,

We have seen each other seven times today and I feel it is getting a bit excessive. I feel the need to start exploring other types out there. I see a cacher I know from home pbookman has visited you recently. I had no idea other Delawarians were seeing you. Know I know.

JQ

 

JOE,

Now that we have run into each other eight times today, I need to break off our relationship. I need to seek other, more challenging relationships. Thanks for being here today when I needed you.

JQ

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I was relatively simple in my logs until I started placing caches. When I did, I started enjoying what people wrote (most of the time), and decided to get more detailed with my logs. I usually have some cut-and-paste ending, such as "This was 1/23 on a caching trip to (this area) - TFTC!", but always start off with something more about the specific cache or site, since there's always something to say.

 

I do hate it when I get people that find mine, and always say the exact same thing. There is a finder in our area who always says

 

THANKS FOR THE HIDE

 

in all caps, which is irritating to start with, but never says anything.

 

I also have my notifications set to let me know if there are any logs posted in my area, because I like to see how people are finding caches in the area. Yes, i'm nosy :) - Anyway, it is interesting to see who does that all the time, and read some of the experiences in my area with caches I'm familiar with. But the people who always post the same thing, cut-and-paste, is very irritating.

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I do hate it when I get people that find mine, and always say the exact same thing. There is a finder in our area who always says

 

THANKS FOR THE HIDE

 

:) , I did get a little more out of the guru a couple of times and I was shocked :blink:

 

HAD A GREAT TIME WITH THE GROUP. THANKS FOR THE HIDE

and not in caps

Would not want to try this one in winter TFTC

:)

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I agree with 9key. Even if the hide was a stinker, try to say it politely in a few words. The cache or the log isn't the real story though, the hunt is. Or maybe, the circumstances and your actions are. Who knows!

 

I do consider it funny that my longest log was for a bison tube in a picnic area. It wasn't the hide, or the container, or the location. It was merely me telling the story of my own ineptness and the extra effort to correct my screw-up. Face it folks, if we can't laugh at ourselves, we can't laugh at all. :)

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I agree with 9key. Even if the hide was a stinker, try to say it politely in a few words. The cache or the log isn't the real story though, the hunt is. Or maybe, the circumstances and your actions are. Who knows!

 

I do consider it funny that my longest log was for a bison tube in a picnic area. It wasn't the hide, or the container, or the location. It was merely me telling the story of my own ineptness and the extra effort to correct my screw-up. Face it folks, if we can't laugh at ourselves, we can't laugh at all. :)

Those are the best logs! I enjoy logging my blunders as well. I love it when funny stuff happens to people. :blink:
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Here's a short list of things you can comment on if you can't think of anything to write in an online log:

 

* what was the weather like?

* see any animals, pretty flowers, nudists, etc?

* condition of the cache?

* logbook full?

* condition of swag?

* easy to find? tough?

* coordinate accuracy - good or bad?

* accuracy of terrain and difficulty ratings

* travel bug inventory

* history of the area

* memories of previous caches in the area

* comment on the state of the cache's camo, or lack there of

* did you like the cache?

* any park weirdos?

* talk to any muggles or LEO's?

I could go on and on!

 

Don't get me started on put-and-paste logs... :)

It was my experience that when i logged creatively and honestly and mentioned these points, far too many times (although admittedly there were only a handful) the cache owners or some busybody who read the logs female dogged about it.

 

I used to enjoy logging. To me it was the highlight of the day to come home and write about it. But after a while i got tired of setting myself up for abuse. (I don't know why I still do it in the forums...)

 

If the owner considers the logs a return gift for their gift of the cache, then the owner must simply say "thank you" when someone logs- or say nothing at all.

 

If enough times a person is made to feel sorry they logged, their logs get shorter and ultimately disappear.

 

This may not be what's causing your observation so much as the general micro spew, but perhaps worth the community's consideration.

 

Courtesy has to go both ways or it fails.

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I only write longer logs if the cache was memorable or fun for me. I know a lot of people log this way.

From this, it sounds like the majority of caches you do are neither memorable nor fun for you.

 

So why do you do them?

I'm not sure how you deduced "majority" out of what I said. It is actually closer to a minority. I am trying to make it more of a minority. So I have adapted my behavior in the last year and I am trying to skip "short log" caches, but sometimes it's hard to tell which ones those are. Plus the true test is whether or not I can remember them when I log them online the next day. :) Edited by TrailGators
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I only write longer logs if the cache was memorable or fun for me. I know a lot of people log this way.

From this, it sounds like the majority of caches you do are neither memorable nor fun for you.

 

So why do you do them?

 

I used to feel the same way but I've kind of adopted the policy that it's up to me to make my own fun in this world. I can usually find something to write about at or around the cache.

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I only write longer logs if the cache was memorable or fun for me. I know a lot of people log this way.

From this, it sounds like the majority of caches you do are neither memorable nor fun for you.

 

So why do you do them?

 

I used to feel the same way but I've kind of adopted the policy that it's up to me to make my own fun in this world. I can usually find something to write about at or around the cache.

I guess what I said came off as sounding negative. So I'll try to restate it in a more positive way. You are 100% right. It is up to us to make our own fun. I really enjoy the camaraderie and the experience of being out my caching friends. It's a new group each time and it's fun to see who will show up. Also being outside in the fresh air and beautiful scenery is what's most fun for me. The caches are what got me there and I'm always appreciative of those types. I always "try" to write one positive quality that a particular cache had. :) Edited by TrailGators
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I've been guilty of cutting and pasting the same log for multiple caches, especially now that, like most cachers, I tend to find 20+ caches in a day. They tend to blur.

I carry a note pad and jot down something about each cache, no matter how mundane. Also, I'm not in a rush to get them all logged. I found 50 caches in one day a few months ago and it took me a long week to get them all logged.

 

 

*grin* That's exactly what I do... I have my - well, I'm on my second 'little black book' of caches, I've already filled one memobook. Whenever I find a cache, I write down /something/ memorable. Especially if I know I'll find a lot of caches that day. My first paragraph in a log is always a cut-n-paste about who I was with or what I was planning on doing that day, and I write a second one detailing that specific cache experience.

 

If I'm finding a lot by the same cacher though, I skip the first paragraph after the first time. No sense boring anyone to death!

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Here's a short list of things you can comment on if you can't think of anything to write in an online log:

 

* what was the weather like?

* see any animals, pretty flowers, nudists, etc?

 

I don't suscribe to theory of long-winded glowing logs for every cache. (I wonder about cachers who do my two-mile seven-stage mystery cache, and log "Found it." But that doesn't bother me.)

I wrote one of my longer logs yesterday... And it's your fault that it includes:

Swimming is prohibited here. (Swimming only permitted in state parks at areas with life guards.) And I encountered the first nudist I've encountered in three years of gocaching!

:D

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Hi there... I'm new to geocaching... only 4 finds so far, and in my case, it was complete ignorance. I've seen a few people do some really neat logs, and I agree that they are far more interesting, and much more fun. This was a good topic to start... even if you just reached me! Now I know. :D

 

Happy Caching.

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One of my favorite parts of hiding caches is (or was) receiving emailed logs from the cachers that have found or not found my caches. My enjoyment of this part of the game has diminished over the last couple of years due to the increasingly poor logging practices of my fellow cachers.

Yes, I know, an LPC doesn't deserve a 100 word log and that's not what I'm talking about (I don't hide those anyway). What I'm ranting about today is the poor quality of online logs on quality caches.

"TNLNSL - TFTC" isn't an acceptable log on a cache that's on many people's favorites list. Many newbies seem to start off logging with the dreaded acronyms and never get away from it unfortunately.

I've asked some cachers that write turd logs why they do it and for the most part they say "I can't think of anything to write", or "I'm not creative". I'm not looking for a witty, creative, Kurt Vonnegut-type log, just something descriptive of your time hunting the cache. Its really not hard and only takes a few seconds longer than the "TNLNSL - TFTC" carp.

 

Here's a short list of things you can comment on if you can't think of anything to write in an online log:

 

* what was the weather like?

* see any animals, pretty flowers, nudists, etc?

* condition of the cache?

* logbook full?

* condition of swag?

* easy to find? tough?

* coordinate accuracy - good or bad?

* accuracy of terrain and difficulty ratings

* travel bug inventory

* history of the area

* memories of previous caches in the area

* comment on the state of the cache's camo, or lack there of

* did you like the cache?

* any park weirdos?

* talk to any muggles or LEO's?

I could go on and on!

 

Don't get me started on put-and-paste logs... :D

I tend to put a lot of tender loving care into all my find logs and my DNF logs, and they remain very creative and relatively lengthy. And, in turn, most of our caches -- particularly most of our Psycho caches -- continue to receive glowing and rather lengthy logs, full of fun detail (some examples appear below...). However, I do notice, particularly for many of the more generic lame urban micros which now litter the landscape, that most folks just sign "TNLNSL". And, it is true that there are some cachers who simply cannot leave a log entry much longer than four words -- perhaps they are just not very good with the written word, and that is all fine with me.

 

As promised above, here is an example of the kind of logs our Psycho caches receive... The logs below represent just some of the find logs from yesterday alone (Saturday, Sept. 1, 2007) from our really sick 5/5 Psycho Urban Cache #10 - Derelict Grunge Acropolis, and the logs represent finds by cachers from at least four states (NY, PA, DE, MD):

 

Cache Logs

:D September 1 by Eagleblazer (816 found)

WOW! My first PUC and what a one to start with. My son (he'll be 18 tomarrow)and I pulled up on a group of gathering cachers and parked along the side. After Matt Krull made his intro we headed off for the acropolis. Everybody went in one way and I another till I realized I needed a little more light. I came out and started climbing up to where my son was with couple o cachers, the rappers and helptech and started searching when Beau found it a few feet away. We all signed it and when I was trying to close it the rubber seal kept popping off but I got it and Beau rehid it. When we got down I escorted Jo up to their car to get a first aide kit as she got pretty scuffed up. While we were walking back we saw a guy walking toward the area and he wasn't looking for caches.After exploring all the tunnels and rooms and seeing just about everything Vinny listed; my son, Dr. Evil, skeeterbait?, and myself all climbed to the top and walked down to the other end to check out where the gun turrets used to be and when we came back there was a really big guy with his shirt off sitting on top of a wall watching everyone. Needless to say we went out another way and saw that everyone else had already left for #8. If it wasn't for all the nastyness, this would be a fun place to explore. TFTC

 

Just wanted to add that you will never fully apreciate the name till you've done this cache.

[view this log on a separate page]

 

:D September 1 by Bocco (1844 found)

Arrived at GZ to find about half of what would turn out to be around 15 to 20 cachers to go on a search thru the caves of Baltimore. took about 10 to 15 minutes and the crew kept getting smaller and smaller, so I asked Beau of COC if he had found the cache and he said yep! so I decided to go over where he was searching last and caught another group of cachers red handed signing the log. These types of caches are so much easier and more fun with a great group of cachers. TFTC

[view this log on a separate page]

 

:D September 1 by Fireguy15 (1170 found)

Well we were the last to arrive and many of the super sized group had already found and signed the log. So off we went for our attempt. We found a signing party and decided to hang back and wait till the area was a little clearer. Well we were very cautions to make sure no part of us came in contact with anything we did not have the intention of touching anyway. After the signing party departed we made our way to the cache to do what we came to do. Only thing is the cachers before us rehid the little bugger. Luckily JennySue made the find in short order and we were on our way. At one point I contemplated jumping off a ledge I was on and to the ground below because there was enough latex lining the area to ensure a safe landing (without worry of blowing out a knee) but science class flashed into my mind reminding me of the "equal and opposite reaction" and I was a little concerned on what would be flung up into the air upon impact. Thanks for another great addition to the Psycho Urban caches.

[view this log on a separate page]

 

:D September 1 by jennysue (615 found)

Arrived a little later then the group did, but it didn't matter everyone was still there and just finishing up signing the log. We made our way into the creepy place to look for the cache. Found it without any problems and headed back out to see where the group was headed next. Wow what a big group and what a place to hide this cache...Thanks for the fun...

[view this log on a separate page]

 

:D September 1 by coupleocachers (828 found)

Well after the being here before once with Redlights, Mrs. SeekPeeKr's and Vincehayter and a DNF there was no doubt that we would return as well. Since a couple of weeks ago, Team "No Name" was sucessful with a find. Well after the Summer Picnic, We decided to post a note on the MDGPS Caching partners thread for a group effort on this, knowing the area we wouldn't want to come alone. Well this group turned into a Supergroup as Mmammel stated below. Well were about third to arrive and meet up with our friends from NY and DE. Well we waited for a minute, and whats that in a distance a row of cars. A litle while waiting with about 6 people a guy came up to us asking if anyone we were looking for a "date" we all said no. Then the guy walked about 5 feet away and turned around and introduced hisself has Mat Krul. Best Greeting every, especially in this area. About 8 vechiles pulled in. Our group consisted of about 23 or 22 people. 1 who have already completed it. After our little M&G we decend our assault.

 

All of us arrived on top to figure out an approximately where GZ was. Then we decend into the gross tunnel with hard hats, head lamps, torches, yes torches, flashlights, gloves and everything Vinny pretty much said that we needed. What we forgot the ladder. Oops. But we found a much easier way up. A bunch of took one side, another took over there, another over there, a few there, a few here.

 

We took the area that had the cache. Took us about 10 to 15 minutes to find this little guy. Climbing and crawling. Beau probably crawled past the cache a few times. Eventually he finally spotted something out of the area. He was able to get the cache. Eagleblazer, Helptech3, and The Rappers was close by to sign the log first. We all are hush, and we then signed the log, and hide it the way we found it. After finding the cache, Eagleblazer and Jo were the first down, while on the way down, Jo scrapped her knee. After we got down and went out to Join our watcher. We let everyone know that we had found it, but didn't tell them where it was, and made them do the work theirselfs.

 

So we can finally put a find on this baby. Thanks Vinny & Sue for a fun cache. This is our 3rd PUC in the serries that we have completed. Can't wait to do more.

 

Now where off to PUC #8. Luckily we didn't find anyone looking for a "date" or "having any fun" and Not one of us backed in.

[view this log on a separate page]

 

B) September 1 by JPatton (1742 found)

I pulled up to see a large crowd already waiting at the parking area. After a few more cachers arrived, we set off to GZ, spread out and started searching. With a crowd this large, it didn't take too long before the cache was spotted. The location does live up to it's reputation, it's dirty, slimey and and totally disgusting. Our large crowd kept the residents away, but there was one guy in a suit and tie who came up and asked if we were looking for a date. After telling him no, he joined us on the cache hunt.

[view this log on a separate page]

 

:D September 1 by helptech3 (34 found)

Found with monster group today it is always great to know there are scummier places in baltimore than what most people know about. Thanks for showing me this one. I dont want to know how exactly you came across this place but it definately goes down in my book as the most disgusting places I have visited. I am glad that while walking about I did not come across any of the uncomfortable situations previously mentioned in the logs, I think on this day we had the locals scattering. TNLNSL

[view this log on a separate page]

 

:D September 1 by mmammel (300 found)

Arrived here 2 minutes after the posted meeting time for the CoupleOcachers organized monster group, and already cachers had filled the fort. Fortunately when I crawled into the area of GZ, the earlier finders had cleared out and I was able to make the find myself. I was prepared with latex gloves and body armor to shield myself from the resident slime and microbial flora. Definitely a fun experience,

Thanks, Mark

[view this log on a separate page]

 

:D September 1 by trainbug (239 found)

Arrived a little early and Rapper from Delaware showed up few minutes later so we decided to get a start on it. We searched around a bit, determined about where it should be, and went back and waited for the rest to show up before starting the dirty work. By 10 everyone seemed to be there so we took off for it. With close to 20 people searching every nook and cranny it wasn't long before it was located and then it was just a matter of time while everyone got to the cache site to sign the log.

[view this log on a separate page]

 

End of the excerpt of some of the log entries (there are more on the cache listing page) from PUC #10 for yesterday, Sept. 1, 2007.

 

I am tempted to copy and paste an equal number of equally-lengthy and fun find logs from yesterday alone for our 4.5/5 Psycho Urban Cache #8 -- Ghost in Ancient Citadel, but I will leave that for later or for another thread, as I suspect that you are getting my point, that many geocachers continue to leave really fine and lengthy logs for really tough and creative caches! :D

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I agree with lots of what's been said on this and mostly have tried to put some detail in my logs.

We did a series of 10 micros today and I did put pretty much the same not on all, though thinking it through we could have put a sentence or two on each to differentiate the experience. However, I will send a separate email to the placer to say how much we appreciated the pretty drive through the Forest and all the picnic spots we didn't know about!

 

Another dimension to think about is that it's not just the cache owner that likes to read logs - once I've found a cache I like to go at least some way back in the logs and read other people's experiences.

Also, if we really can't find a cache, we'll read the logs before we look at the hint (we don't read them before we make the first attempt). Some details there about difficulty etc can be good pointers to us as to whether we're on the right track.

 

As to doing a lot in a day and not having time to write long caches/not being able to remember I think I'll heed the methods of someone else who wrote on this thread, taking a notebook with me to jot down interesting details and maybe taking a few days to log all the finds - or DNF's which I think are just as important to log.

 

Happy caching everyone,

TheWife

HoweFamily

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I've started using a notebook for camping/caching trips where I may find too many caches to remember everything at the end of the week. I make notes after each cache, or at least at the end of each day. It's much easier than doing it on the PDA. I find it frustrating to submit a log and then remember such-and-such event which would have made a great story.

English was my worst subject at school, but even I find no problem in finding something reasonably interesting or entertaining to say on most caches, so why do some people struggle so much? I think we all know the answer to that one. You don't have to write a lot, just something personal to the cache.

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I guess I have 2 things to say. One thing that Jeannette has taught me is that I should not base my happiness on the actions of others, that way lies grief.

 

The second, for those that say "I can't be creative on all my logs." With the exception of lame caches, yes you can, you owe it to the hider. Witness on of my more recent, and silly logs.

 

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/log.aspx?LU...34-62d03112cf7b

 

That's just what I was thinking about before, during, and after the cache run.

 

Paul

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Here is a great log and I am looking forward to reading all the logs on the thirty caches in the list. :anicute:

 

I haven't yet logged my finds from my desert adventure yesterday because I want them to be worthy of the caches I found, some of which were placed back in 2001 when people wrote good logs on the caches they found. :blink:

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Here is a great log and I am looking forward to reading all the logs on the thirty caches in the list. :blink:

 

I haven't yet logged my finds from my desert adventure yesterday because I want them to be worthy of the caches I found, some of which were placed back in 2001 when people wrote good logs on the caches they found. :anicute:

There were a lot fewer caches back then. Also most of those older caches took people to some pretty cool spots too! I still think that the better the cache, the longer the logs are. If someone throws a cache in a bush at Burger King, they shouldn't be too dissappointed when they don't get any long appreciative logs for that cache....
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I love "Its Not About The Numbers" so I can keep track of little things like this:

 

Log Length, words: Average: 55, Longest: GCZJWT 407, Shortest: GCN5BQ 1 (fixed so its now about 30 words, think I was in a hurry that day)

 

ranked 10th in WA. I recently got bumped down 2 spots, going to have to try harder I guess. :anicute:

 

 

Logs are the lifepulse of a cache IMHO. They give a cache an identity far beyond what a description can give. If it wasn't for interesting logs, I doubt I would bother making my caches as interesting. Same applies to TBs in my book, logs are what tells the story behind its travels.

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Here is a great log and I am looking forward to reading all the logs on the thirty caches in the list. :blink:

 

I haven't yet logged my finds from my desert adventure yesterday because I want them to be worthy of the caches I found, some of which were placed back in 2001 when people wrote good logs on the caches they found. :anicute:

There were a lot fewer caches back then. Also most of those older caches took people to some pretty cool spots too! I still think that the better the cache, the longer the logs are. If someone throws a cache in a bush at Burger King, they shouldn't be too dissappointed when they don't get any long appreciative logs for that cache....

I agree strongly that the better and the more memorable the cache, the longer and better are the logs, with just a few minor exceptions (i.e., those folks who are "find log challenged" and who cannot for the life of them leave an online log entry of more than four words...); I think that my recent example (in the thread above) citing log entries from just one of our caches from September 1 illustrates this point quite well.

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I agree with mudsneaker:

 

"Logs are the lifepulse of a cache IMHO. They give a cache an identity far beyond what a description can give. If it wasn't for interesting logs, I doubt I would bother making my caches as interesting. Same applies to TBs in my book, logs are what tells the story behind its travels."

 

I don't think anyone is talking about not having a good log if someone throws a cache in a bush at Burger King, I wouldn't write a good log for a cache at one anyway. In fact I doubt I would ever do a cache at a place like that.

 

This cache has 267 finds:

 

A Criminal Education

 

While most of the logs could be described as good to great some are like this example:

 

Found it

 

The next person to log didn't even leave any words just blank space. I hope that was a mistake and maybe they will read this leave a comment.

This cache has a unique location for an urban cache and most certainly a unique and large container. It even has a simple puzzle to boot.

 

Surely that person can GIVE more to the cache owner than he took away that day.

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And other than that, I just get a lot of pleasure in telling a good story. This one was fun to write. :)

CYBret, great story. I was laughing hard enough I had trouble reading it aloud to wife, she just sat across the room and shook her head up to the finale. Then she broke down and laughed too. Thanks, great use of double meaning and entertaining.

 

I mentioned earlier that my longest log was one laughing at my predicament. Hope someone gets a chuckle from THIS.

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Personally, I try to write a bit about each and like to include photos that we take along the way too. I would have written more at times, but all I ever see are short logs. I figured no one would want my book...er log....

I think it might be the same for lots of newbies out there anyway. Now that I know that people like it, I'll write more.

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[*]Cachers are too busy trying to log all 50 to 100 finds for the day, rather than taking the time to write nice logs. [*]

 

Holy cow! I found 6 today and thought that was awesome! How does anybody find that many in one day? Are there geocaching super powers that I'm not aware of?!!

 

As for the logs, I try to say something about every cache I find. I know I'd love it in return, so I follow the golden rule.

Then again, I'm a writer at heart!

Edited by AustinSweetnSour
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I love "Its Not About The Numbers" so I can keep track of little things like this:

 

Log Length, words: Average: 55, Longest: GCZJWT 407, Shortest: GCN5BQ 1 (fixed so its now about 30 words, think I was in a hurry that day)

 

ranked 10th in WA. I recently got bumped down 2 spots, going to have to try harder I guess. :D

 

:) I'm not as wordy in general as I was when I started. But I have the two largest logs in Washington, on INATN. :)

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I love "Its Not About The Numbers" so I can keep track of little things like this:

 

Log Length, words: Average: 55, Longest: GCZJWT 407, Shortest: GCN5BQ 1 (fixed so its now about 30 words, think I was in a hurry that day)

 

ranked 10th in WA. I recently got bumped down 2 spots, going to have to try harder I guess. :D

 

:) I'm not as wordy in general as I was when I started. But I have the two largest logs in Washington, on INATN. :)

 

I checked myself on the "It's Not About Numbers" site:

Average log size: 40.3 words - Biggest log: 267 words - Shortest log: 6 words - Number of one-word logs: 0

Edited by TrailGators
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i don't really care when people write something like TFTC or just the plain and simple "nice hide" reasponse but i do love it when peolpe write detailed stuff about their adventure to my caches. i mean, when i hid my first cache it was so exciting and i put my heart and soul into the cache, but when someone writes something like.... "nice area TNLNSL" it's really disapointing. cuz some of the more experienced cachers just say the old thing over and over again- that kind of gets under my skin because isn't that like losing sight of what this game was really intent to be, not just finding the most but enjoying the experience?

also those cut and paste responses are annoying. sometimes i'll read one log from a cache and then i'll read the same thing again by the same person on a cache nearby.

 

all i can say is...., to all of you cachers who have written interesting stuff on the logs: thank you very very much, you bighten my day!!!! :)

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Well, here's my pet peeve : How come so many people type "cut and paste" then they probably really mean "copy and paste" ? I mean, do these people even think about what they're typing and what it means?

 

And what's with cache hiders who put "None needed" in the hints section of the cache page? Is that supposed to be a hint? I mean, if you don't have a hint, leave the freaking box empty!

 

Ahhh, now I feel better ...

 

Back on topic ... on Saturday I did 21 urban caches. All but maybe two were so mind-numbingly cookie-cutter "Altoids under an lamp post" that I barely remembered them when I logged then today ( two days later ). The lamers that I could remember just got a smiley, the two gooders got a couple of sentences or an actual sentence.

 

Today I did five caches, one a cool urban micro, another a regular in a cool place, and three excellent desert caches. I made sure that they all knew that I appreciated the cache with a decent online log ( or I hope that it was decent ).

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As a newbie, I must say that it is easier to write the acronyms and keep it very short even though most cache days are 4 finds or less for us. After reading this post, I see things from the other side: the hiders. If I went through the effort of hiding a cache, I would really want quality feedback. I hear you.

 

So from this point on, I will write in as much detail as I can remember and try to upload some pics (without disclosing any information on the cache).

 

I think we all need to spread the word both in the forums, PM's to the guilty and Geocache meets.

 

In this busy world, it is too easy to keep things simple/minimal and move on. For that very reason, I chose to participate in this sport AND teach my kids more than what they are subject to within our four walls.

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And what's with cache hiders who put "None needed" in the hints section of the cache page? Is that supposed to be a hint? I mean, if you don't have a hint, leave the freaking box empty!

 

Ahhh, now I feel better ...

Here's a good one. You arrive at the cache location and there are hundreds of rocks and the hint says "Under a rock." Thanks for the hint! :):)
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Logs are the lifepulse of a cache IMHO. They give a cache an identity far beyond what a description can give. If it wasn't for interesting logs, I doubt I would bother making my caches as interesting. Same applies to TBs in my book, logs are what tells the story behind its travels.

 

Mudsneaker's quote above is very appropriate. It IS the logs left by the cache finders which encourage a cache hider to continue to try to be creative (both with the cache page as well as the cache, itself) and give back something meaningful to the caching community. If all a cache owner gets is a barage of the stupid TNLNSL (or less) variety of logs, where is the incentive to continue to place interesting caches?

 

Consider this analogy. You spent all day preparing a wonderful dinner (and I mean the whole works from appetizer through desert, all homemade from scratch ingredients, nothing out of a box) to which you invited some very special people into your home. When your guests had had their fill of this wonderful repast, they simply got up, put on their coats, left your home with barely a "thank you." Wouldn't you think that after all the effort you had put into preparing this great feast that they were extremely RUDE? Would you want to invite them back again? No? Not hardly!

 

Well, my friends, that is exactly what a cacher finder is doing when they can't be bothered to say even a sentence or two about anything SPECIFIC to an individual cache! It's a slap in the face to the cache hider and RUDENESS in the first degree! Inexcusable.

 

Just my opinion.

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I don't know if it is an Ontario thing, something in the water, or an excess of creative genius, but I have found a great many of the logs here very entertaining. Maybe there is an unspoken contest to see who can be the wittiest logger (note to self: look into hush-hush witty logger conspiracy :) ).

 

I always try to write something that will inform and inspire other cachers to go to (or stay away from - for their own good... really) the caches I have visited. I personally enjoy the chance to revisit the scenery, wildlife, trials, tribulations, and adventures of each cache as I log the find. I also look at logging as an opportunity to sharpen "the force" within me by making connections between stupid actions I took, dumb mistakes I made, and things I forgot to do/bring/get again, so that I learn... eventually, and become a much better cacher.

 

Multicolor1

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And what's with cache hiders who put "None needed" in the hints section of the cache page? Is that supposed to be a hint? I mean, if you don't have a hint, leave the freaking box empty!

 

Ahhh, now I feel better ...

Here's a good one. You arrive at the cache location and there are hundreds of rocks and the hint says "Under a rock." Thanks for the hint! :):)

 

We walk away from rockpiles.

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A subject close to our hearts.

I noticed that using a pocket pc or palm in the field and trying to log from that shortens logs. As does any log made via wap.

To qoute our own profile page

 

 

We realised quite a while ago that as cache owners the online logs are about the only true reward for planting a cache. There is no better feeling than when someone else writes good things about your cache in the online log. This has given us the resolve to write a good log for every cache we find, of course writing generic log number five on a power trail differently to the other four logs is quite hard (hence part of our dislike of these) but we try to make the effort every time.

 

You may be thinking why bother with good logs for all the lame micros in the hedge or a lay by or at motorway services ?, well our reasoning is that if the owner gets a log like that just once out of the hundreds of other TFTC logs they will get that feeling of delight and maybe just maybe will try to plant something more interesting the next time they are placing a cache. Or wirite more interesting logs when they find thier next cache.

 

Average log size: 143 words - Biggest log: 800 words - Shortest log: 6 words - Number of one-word logs: 0

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