Jump to content

I Placed A Geocache, And Afterwards A Capercaillie Attacked Me


Followers 2

Recommended Posts

We have a sport here called 'To the Top 2006'. This year it's included totally 8 heights and tops in the area, with a sign placed on each top. On the sign there's a keyword we have to write down to prove that we have been there. I have made waypoint for alle the tops and loaded them in the 60CS.

 

May 20th 2006 I went to the height Tikneppen, a very nice hike. I placed a geocache Sirkus1 near by the top. Last week shows that this cache is popular.

 

On my way back I suddenly heard a 'klonk' behind me. A capercaillie was ready to attack me. I stopped and took some pictures of him. Suddenly he attacked, and I ran 15-20m and stopped, turned around and took some more pictures, I just had to get some pictures of this stately tough chap. I also managed to film some of the capercaillie performance. He attacked again, and now I ran a long way from him.

 

The capercaillie males fight in the autumn, the autumn play. Ca 5% of them don't stop to fight when the fighting season is over, but they continue and some of them also attacks people. That's normal. They are called nonsense-capercaillies, nonsense to us but normal for them.

 

The pictures are here:

http://www.navigate3d.de/mbbs22en/photos/p...s.asp?albumid=5

 

The film of the big fight is here:

http://www.navigate3d.de/mbbs22en/forums/t...posts=1&start=1

 

So this was a very special geocaching experience, and I'm very glad I had the opportunity to take pictures and make a video.

 

If anybody else have similar stories, I'm sure a lot of forum members would like to read them.

 

Enjoy.

 

Otto :lol:

Edited by OttoLund
Link to comment

On my way back I suddenly heard a 'klonk' behind me. A capercaillie was ready to attack me. I stopped and took some pictures of him. Suddenly he attacked, and I ran 15-20m and stopped, turned around and took some more pictures, I just had to get some pictures of this stately tough chap. I also managed to film some of the capercaillie performance. He attacked again, and now I ran a long way from him.

 

Let me be the first to admit that I had to click on the link to find out what a capercaillie is.

 

Great story, BTW.

Edited by CheshireFrog
Link to comment

On my way back I suddenly heard a 'klonk' behind me. A capercaillie was ready to attack me. I stopped and took some pictures of him. Suddenly he attacked, and I ran 15-20m and stopped, turned around and took some more pictures, I just had to get some pictures of this stately tough chap. I also managed to film some of the capercaillie performance. He attacked again, and now I ran a long way from him.

 

Let me be the first to admit that I had to click on the link to find out what a capercaillie is.

 

Great story, BTW.

 

Me too. And for anyone else who wonders it looks like a big angry chicken.

 

How big is that thing btw?

Link to comment

On my way back I suddenly heard a 'klonk' behind me. A capercaillie was ready to attack me. I stopped and took some pictures of him. Suddenly he attacked, and I ran 15-20m and stopped, turned around and took some more pictures, I just had to get some pictures of this stately tough chap. I also managed to film some of the capercaillie performance. He attacked again, and now I ran a long way from him.

 

Let me be the first to admit that I had to click on the link to find out what a capercaillie is.

 

Great story, BTW.

 

Me too. And for anyone else who wonders it looks like a big angry chicken.

 

How big is that thing btw?

 

You see the size on the film, behind my bicycle, a lot of meat, and it bites, grabs you with his claws and knocks with his wings:

http://www.navigate3d.de/mbbs22en/forums/t...posts=1&start=1

 

Otto :lol:

Link to comment

I too had to go see the pics to figure out what a caper-whatever was! I have a small research farm here, and we have a wide variety of chickens, Bantams, ducks, geese and Guinea fowl, and sometimes the geese (a very aggressive breed) and male ducks (again, a very aggressive breed, particularly in springtime, which is breeding and egg-laying season), and particularly Guinea hens with babies, will go into total attack mode when I am in the pens feeding them or hanging out with them. It is rather hilarious! I especially love it when our two 23 pound monster white geese bite my fingers when I extend my hand to them! I usually end up petting them and hugging them when they try to do this, and it drives them crazy! We have an adorable little Mallard-looking boy duck named Peter Duck. Whenever I am in the pen, he comes right up to me and nibbles my pants legs, and my fingers if I will offer them. And then he gets up on my lap and keeps nibbling my fingers, half affectionately, and half because of some ancient instinct to attack! It is hilarious!

 

A photo of our two attack geese, Filomena and Georgette, spending quality time with me is shown below.

e791e06c-a0e5-4065-97ab-45fc5c8bc4ae.jpg

Link to comment

On my way back I suddenly heard a 'klonk' behind me. A capercaillie was ready to attack me. I stopped and took some pictures of him. Suddenly he attacked, and I ran 15-20m and stopped, turned around and took some more pictures, I just had to get some pictures of this stately tough chap. I also managed to film some of the capercaillie performance. He attacked again, and now I ran a long way from him.

 

Let me be the first to admit that I had to click on the link to find out what a capercaillie is.

 

Great story, BTW.

 

Me too. And for anyone else who wonders it looks like a big angry chicken.

 

How big is that thing btw?

 

A big angry chicken on steriods even!

 

That thing looks mean!

Link to comment

What a beauty! I've never seen one of those before, such a stunning face with that red "eyebrow"!

I did not hear it make any sounds in the clip, do they not vocalize while being aggressive?

Thanks for posting your pics and video :lol:

It didn't make a sound when it attacked. They only make some 'klonk-klonk' sounds now and then between the attacks.

 

Otto :tired:

Link to comment

I figure that if something is attacking me, and I need to Google it in order to find out what it is, it has earned the right to eat me.

 

Sheesh, I'd save the googling for sleepy time after BBQ when I survived the attack and feasted on my foe.

 

I agree with the above. Looks like a cousin to the (wild) turkey. Maybe meaner.

Link to comment

You're welcome.

 

I found some information about capercaillie, capercaillie on the British Isles:

 

Tetrao urogallus

 

A huge woodland grouse, the large black males are unmistakable. They spend a lot of time feeding on the ground, but may also be found in trees, feeding on shoots. localised breeding species, found in Scottish native pinewood, a rare and vulnerable habitat, and in commercial conifer plantations. The UK capercaillie population has declined so rapidly that it is at very real risk of extinction (for the second time) and is a 'Red List' species.

 

Capercaillie, code red:

Red is the highest conservation priority, with species needing urgent action.

 

Source links:

http://www.rspb.org.uk/birds/guide/c/capercaillie/index.asp

http://www.rspb.org.uk/birds/guide/status_explained.asp

 

Later I'll' try to find some information about capercaillie in other parts of the world. F.ex., it's not at risk for extinction in Norway, for the time beeing :laughing:

Edited by OttoLund
Link to comment

You're welcome.

 

I found some information about capercaillie, capercaillie on the British Isles:

 

Tetrao urogallus

 

A huge woodland grouse, the large black males are unmistakable. They spend a lot of time feeding on the ground, but may also be found in trees, feeding on shoots. localised breeding species, found in Scottish native pinewood, a rare and vulnerable habitat, and in commercial conifer plantations. The UK capercaillie population has declined so rapidly that it is at very real risk of extinction (for the second time) and is a 'Red List' species.

 

Capercaillie, code red:

Red is the highest conservation priority, with species needing urgent action.

 

Source links:

http://www.rspb.org.uk/birds/guide/c/capercaillie/index.asp

http://www.rspb.org.uk/birds/guide/status_explained.asp

 

Later I'll' try to find some information about capercaillie in other parts of the world. F.ex., it's not at risk for extinction in Norway, for the time beeing :laughing:

 

One of them attacks me and he WILL become extinct!

Link to comment

Great pics!

When I was in my young teens, I was a Zoological Explorer Scout, and we worked at the Seneca Park Zoo on weekends. In those days, down by the large, hoofed animal area, there were a bunch of guinea fowl and jungle fowl that hung around the barn. The jungle fowl were fine until...

The big yellow boots were put on! :laughing:

They hated those boots! They would run up and leap into the air, trying to sink their spurs into your leg! I can still hear the pitter patter of angry chicken feet running up behind me! Once the boots were off, the returned to their normal, benign, jungle chicken selves. :laughing:

Link to comment

I hear they like to eat frogs hummmm

 

Hide the CheshireFrog

 

hehehe :ph34r::huh:

 

Wonderful.

 

As if I didn't have enough to worry about, now I have to keep one eye out for giant, mutant European chicken/turkey/ostrich hybrids that I didn't even know existed until this morning. Didn't the OP say something about this one eating his bike?

Link to comment

i really thought you made this animal up reading the OP. then i saw the pics, and i was sure you planted a stuffed animal. then i saw the video and couldnt believe an animal so wierd and ugly actually exists! glad youre ok!

I like to know what creatures protect my geocaches when I'm at home :ph34r:

 

We are very glad to have the capercaillie in our forests. They are not dangerous, if you back off. Some of the males get nasty after they have fought for the dames in the autumn. They can kill each other in the autumn play, and I think they do it with some bones in their wings, by hitting the opponent with the wings.

 

They are excellent food. We hunt for them in some areas during wintertime.

 

A part of the excitement was to see if the bird had any possibility to hurt me. And it was very pretty. I didnt' see the details before I came home and studied the pictures, 6mpix in size.

 

He lives there in the forests in temperatures from ca -45C to ca +35C, -49F to +95F, amazing. In wikipedia it's a good description of the capercaillie:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capercaillie

 

"It is a sedentary species, breeding across northern parts of Europe and western and central Asia in mature conifer forests with diverse species composition and a relatively open canopy structure." - Looks like the capercaillie don't exist in Canada and US. I thought it also was be in the forests in Canada and northern parts of US.

 

Thanks for all posts. The geocaching experience has a infinite number of features. I hope to meet a bear sometime. I think I have to travel to the northern part of Sweden. I have a friend there who met a bear. Five minutes after the bear left him he had a minor nervous breakdown :huh: Then I'll become excellent food. A film and pictures of a bear, I really don't know....

Edited by OttoLund
Link to comment

Well, we were (Thankfully!) NOT attacked by this wild animal, but needless to say, having it show up on the trail about 60 - 70 metres from us while we placed a new cache and check us out was a little disconcerting! I asked my wife to get the camera, while I slowly removed the bear spray from my pack. Yes, I actually carry bear spray on caching hikes around here, as there are many places where black bears can be encountered. My thought was that if the bear attacked and ate us, we'd at least have a pic or two to show the world what happened!! :ph34r: ... provided he/she didn't eat the camera as well!

 

Link: http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_detai...12-00d68b1bf9bd

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 2
×
×
  • Create New...