Jump to content

oldsoldier

+Premium Members
  • Posts

    286
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by oldsoldier

  1. I started in 2002. Then, most were in the woods, and I avoided town or city caches like the plague. I can still recall when they removed the variable with navigation (this was before I started caching, but not too much before). My dad had one, I thought it was cool. I honestly dont recall how I found geocaching, but it was in its infancy. I found one when I was stationed in Cuba (at the time, it was the only one there), but, its since been removed, and, for some reason, I dont have any finds prior to 2005. I was in Gitmo from 03-04 and, anyone who has been there, is familiar with the boat landing from the airstrip. There WAS one there, even way back then! Explaining it back then was a little harder, as most people werent aware of what a GPS even was. These days, they are commonplace-but, I am rarely asked what I am doing. PRobably because I try to limit my finds to more woodsy areas. And, I have a rotating schedule, so, I'm out when others are working
  2. I dont anymore. I use notes on my phone, of areas I want to do, but, with the Groundspeak app, I can log everything on my phone, and be done with it. I do keep field notes, but its usually climate, terrain, and only the cache names. I log mainly anything of interest I see, and how long I'm out, but, other than that, I dont reall log anything cache specific outside of the find or DNF logs.
  3. I think this is rather fun, actually. Not saying that there isnt a criminal element in the geocaching community but, as a rule, people are generally upstanding folks. A little light fun isnt bad. I, personally, would find it amusing, myself. Particularly as, in the end, we're both cachers. That being said, officers can gauge attitude pretty fast (most people can, but dont realize that), and, I'm pretty sure that, if the situation started going south, you'd reveal the joke soon enough. In the grand scheme of things, this is nothing more than having a laugh with a fellow cacher. No harm, no foul. It may not be everyones cup of tea, but I think its pretty amusing.
  4. Just an update, I downloaded a PQ today, and its dead simple to do. No issues with it at all. The paperless caching is great, as this wasnt a feature on my old plugger. I can still access them via my phone, but, sometimes, I venture out where there is no signal, so this will help immensely. As to the ease of this? Even I found it simple. All you need to do is follow instructions. When you plug in your Etrex, you need to go into the folders, and drill down and OPEN the GPX folder. From there, simply drag BOTH the PQ folders to the GPX folder in the Garmin, drop them in, unplug the unit, and turn it on. Its a very simple process.
  5. I just picked up a new Etrex 20 from Amazon for $148 shipped. I also had a 60CS, wanted a change (and GLONASS), so I side-graded (not really an up or downgrade, I dont think). The 60 I sold to a friend of mine, cheap. So, we both made out. There were some concerns, initially, regarding loading PQs onto it, but, reading through the issues, it looks to me that most people simply dont know how to load them. I used to load mine from GSAK, but it looks like I can simply load them directly into the device now, which makes it a little easier. And, if I cannot, I can revert back to GSAK, and, problem solved
  6. I have had a couple run ins with police, and with local park rangers, but they have all been amicable. One officer, when I used to carry flyers, was excited to go home and take his kids out, because he hated that they played video games all the time. I thought that was pretty cool. I am a police dispatcher now, and a police dept employee, so, if I get questioned (which I havent) I simply would show my department issued ID, to defuse it a little . That being said though, its never once been a negative experience for me.
  7. I know this thread hasnt been touched in months, but I am a LONG time hanger, started with a DD hammock in 2006. Went to a Hennesy Asym exped in 2007, then a Blackbird in 2008 or so (whenever Brandon first debuted-I was a first run WBBB guy). I faithfully hung in that trusty Blackbird, until this week. I did a winter hang last weekend, and finally got to try out a WB Ridgerunner. And immediately fell in love. I sold my WBBB and UQ on hammockforums within 20 minutes, ordered a ridgerunner, and got it this week. The only downside? I cannot hang in it for the next couple weeks! I havent slept in a tent in years. I could probably count the times in the past 8 years I've slept in a tent on one hand. Once you find the hammock solution that fits you, you will not go back to ground voluntarily!
  8. I took 2 years off (didnt disable it, but didnt cache at all), came back, and picked right back up where I left off. Your paid membership will not freeze though-that will continue, and, should you not reactivate it, it will expire when it is supposed to-provided you dont have automatic renewals.
  9. I have the same model. I bought it when it first came out, and love it. Accuracy is amazing. I have seen other models come out, but, honestly, there is nothing offered that I dont already have, with newer models. I have maps, I can load caches, it shows my history-the only thing I can NOT do is log finds & read cache descriptions. But, I have my phone for that, so, it doesnt matter. So, no, they arent obsolete, by any means. Most of my finds were on that device. And continue to be
  10. This is what I do too. I will log the DNF. If I suspect it is missing, I will certainly make note of that. But, its important to log an initial DNF, so that the CO at least has an idea. Then, if the CO wants to reach out, to double check (I have had a couple do so), and, if I WAS in the wrong area, they will let me know. I dont generally log more than one DNF, unless others log it as found in between. But, I WILL log a note if I go back there and there has been no activity, or no finds, since my last visit. We had a local one like that, where I couldnt find a stage of the puzzle. I tried for 2 years. NO ONE ELSE logged DNFs for the stage. I learned that lesson the hard way.
  11. The only thing I ever leave-and, even then, I only do it sometimes-is one of my signature wooden nickels. I never, ever take from them. Never have.
  12. That map was EXACTLY what I was looking for. Thank you!
  13. Googled it and came up with: GC48CR5 Massachusetts 351 Challenge http://www.geocaching.com/geocache/GC48CR5_massachusetts-351-challenge is that the one? B. Thats the one! Thanks!
  14. Hey all, after a pretty long hiatus away, I am getting back into this again. When I was last active, there was a state challenge, where you would grab at least 1 cache from each town in this state to complete it. I think, at the time, there was a map so you could track your progress. If anyone has a link for this, or could point me to the original thread, it would be appreciated. Thanks!
  15. As the title says, I am wondering if there is some sort of support for the following question: I have a Chromebook, that runs Chrome OS on it. I cannot download any type of software to it, like Clayjar, or anything that will interpret .gpx files from PQs. The files currently arent supported. I was wondering if there are any plans to have some sort of extension in the future,that will allow for these types of files to be sent diretly to my GPS via cable, or if anyone knows of any workaround for it? Thanks in advance!
  16. I have gone through many, many stoves in my hiking career. Canister, alcohol, multifuel-I still own like 6, and am ALWAYS tempted to buy more. This past summer, I picked up an Emberlit wood stove, from the manufacturer, and, well, I have found the PERFECT stove for me. Living in New England, I have no problems finding a fuel source. It may not work so well in other parts of the world, but, for me, where I hike, its perfect. The design is dead simple: there are 5 pieces. Assemble the 4 walls, and the floor, and start a fire inside it. Done. I was a little apprehensive about using this after a rain (or even during one), but I went out immediately after a rain storm this summer, and had no issues finding fuel to boil water. I have the SS version, which weighs in at around 11 ounces; there is also a titanium one too, that weighs less. The pros of a wood burning stove, for me, anyway, are that you will not run out of fuel-boil times are now irrelevant. There is literally nothing to break, or fiddle with. If you can start a fire, you can use this stove. Some of my initial concerns, other than the wetness of fuel, was, initially, possible heat transference from the bottom of the stove, to the ground-and possible secondary ignition due to that. However, with over 40 burns on this so far, I havent had that happen. The bottom plate is about an inch or so off the ground-the ground gets warm, but not hot. You can touch the ground under the stove, and it doesnt burn your fingers. It does require some initial prep, gathering fuel, but this is done in less than 5 minutes. And, it doesnt require a lot-some tinder, then, pencil sized sticks, up to thumb sized. You can pretty much feed any size piece of wood through the feeding port, and it will burn. I have become a convert. I know its not for everyone, but, it certainly fits my style. I dispose of the ashes (surprisingly little, as the fire tends to consume just about everything), by digging a small hole with my heel, putting them in, and pouring water on them. Done. No canisters to pack out, no empty fuel bottles to carry. If you are looking for an alternative to the classic, give one of the wood burning stoves a try!
  17. oldsoldier

    Tapatalk

    I use it for several forums too. And, with the advent of smartphones being used as caching devices, I think it would be a smart idea to integrate new software that is Tapatalk friendly. It would sort of go hand in hand with the geocaching app. I use my Tapatalk on my android ALL the time-rarely accessing forums on computers anymore.
  18. Do you know which model it is? It is a Blaze II, but an older model of it. I purchased it in 2007, I believe, and have only used it a handful of times, for daytrips.
  19. I have a Mountainsmith Lumbar Pack, with the shoulder straps, that is perfect for geocaching. I no longer use it. It is in excellent condition (I can send pictures upon request), and would like to sell it, as I use a different pack now. I am willing to let this go for $50, plus shipping, to anyone in the lower 48. I dont know the size of this, but it holds 2 nalgene bottles, plus 2 large storage areas. Again, I can furnish pics, if interested. Please PM me if you are interested. Thanks in advance!
  20. A quick note about the compass in the GPS60 series (the only ones I have experience with ) and electronic ones in general; my opinion is that you are FAR better off using a standard compass-you can get them far cheaper than the extra it would cost to have it on your GPS unit. They arent entirely accurate, and need to be calibrated regularly. Even if you do it once a week-thats 52 times you need to do it. Whereas a standard compass doesnt need it at all. And, is more reliable, in my experience. Doesnt run out of batteries either. Also, on paperless caching-if you have either an Adroid, iphone, or (I am assuming) a BB, you can purchase the Geocaching app for your phone. I use it on my Android, and love it!! I can go to pretty much any place I like, open up the app, and off I go. It also supports GPX files, if you are a paying member.
  21. I have my service issued MULE, and I keept the following inside it: 100 oz bladder a bunch of wooden nickels in a zip lock bag gloves extra bags a Silva Ranger compass 50' of 550 cord a poncho (I have straps on the outside where I can tie that onto, as well as attach my jacket) A large field knife (I always carry one) snacks a boo boo kit (couple of band aids, a tick remover, some sports tape) a small survival kit (its in a small pouch that I attach to the webbing straps as well) a Heatsheet In addition to this, I also have, on my person: my pocketknife my multitool 2 flashlights There is enough room in this that, if I wanted to put a small pair of binos, I could fit them. This is my primary go-to caching pack now. I also have a Mountainsmitth Lumbar pack, thats rarely used anymore. Which is too bad, its a nice pack-I just have no use for it now.
  22. I have just over 300 caches. I cranked out a bunch, interests changed, then got back into it. Then got deployed. Twice. Then got back into it. Then sort of let off of it for a bit. I guess what I am saying is that I cache in phases. Depending on what my current situation is. But, I think that I am qualified as a cacher. I actually prefer caching in crummy weather-no one stops to ask me what I am doing
  23. Wow first time, thats a LOT!!! I think the most I have ever found in 1 day is 22...and it CERTAINLY wasnt on my first day! Welcome to the addiction!!!
  24. Your dec is gonna throw you off either way...the map is severely outdated, so even terrain association may not work. If YOU shoot an azimuth, then convert it, you would use the dec di on the map; however, again, it may not work so well. Your best bet would be to get a newer map. There are resources online for getting updated maps....beats being lost in the wilderness of alaska!
  25. I made one a few years back that looks very similar to the one above. I got a $10 sled, some PVC tubing & 2 90* elbows, some cheap nylon rope, and 2 U bolts, all for under $20. My harness was an old climbing harness, I just used the waist belt. Here is what I did: drill 4 holes for the u-bolts to pass through on either end of the front end of the sled (the run perpendicular to the sled). Drill holes approximately 8" apart down either side of the sled, and one on the back. Now you're ready for assembly! First, loosely attach the ubolts to the front, with the nuts on top. Second, cut a piece of PVC tubing that will give about 1" of clearance when it passes through the 2 ubolts (allow some extra room for the elbows). Third, cut two pieces of PVC tubing long enough to allow freedom of movement with skis/snowshoes, but not so long that you dont have control (I only snowshoe, so 5' worked fine for me). Fourth, feed the cheap nylon rope through the PVC tubing & elbows in the following order: long piece, elbow, ubolt, short piece of PVC, ubolt, elbow, long piece of PVC. Easier to do this before assembling the PVC. Leave the extra nylon rope hanging out of either end on the long PVC for now. Fifth, assemble the PVC tubing. Pretty simple here; glue or tape the joints. Once its assembled, you can tighten down the ubolts, but dont do it too snug. allow for a little play, so it pivots freely. Sixth, tie a figure 8 knot on one end of the nylon rope, pull the other end snug, tie one at that end, and cut the rest off. Seventh, use the nylon rope to weave in & out of the holes you drilled in the sled. These will be your tie down points. Pull them snug, but not too tight. Tie a simple overhand knot to keep the ends from slipping through the holes. Also, word of advice; if possible, keep the knots on top of the sled; they will gather ice & stuff underneath. Eighth, secure it to your harness, and you're done. I used carabiners, as they were easy to take on & off. Also, a tip passed on to me, and now to you; if you pull with a waistbelt, reverse the belt to that the padded part is against your stomach. It keeps the buckle from digging in. When you pack these, your best bet is to take a tarp, open it up, and place it in the sled. Pack all your gear in it, keeping the profile as low as possible. When its packed, fold the two ends in first, then the sides, like a burrito. Use either the leftover nylon rope, or any other rope (large diameter & synthetic works better) to string it back & forth between the tie down points. Tie & secure. One hours worth of work (if that), $20 in material, and you have a sled.
×
×
  • Create New...