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Jaybee's Geocoin Shipping Method


Go JayBee
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Please use the "Sissy n' CR" method of shipping described below.

 

My shipping requirements are: Large Heavy Envelope (padded ones are nice), Coin wrapped in paper (another layer of protection) & taped down and sandwiched between 2 heavy cards (cereal boxes work nicely), 1st Class Mail. Insured or Delivery Confirmation is optional.

 

Don't just put the coin into an envelope loose...its way too easy for a small slit to be cut, and the coin can just "drop out" (oops).

I know that you serious collectors out there are well aware of what I'm talking about. I would hate to see your package get pillaged.

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Please use the "Sissy n' CR" method of shipping described below.

 

My shipping requirements are: Large Heavy Envelope (padded ones are nice), Coin wrapped in paper (another layer of protection) & taped down and sandwiched between 2 heavy cards (cereal boxes work nicely), 1st Class Mail. Insured or Delivery Confirmation is optional.

 

Don't just put the coin into an envelope loose...its way too easy for a small slit to be cut, and the coin can just "drop out" (oops).

I know that you serious collectors out there are well aware of what I'm talking about. I would hate to see your package get pillaged.

This is the method that I use, ever since I saw it in the forums. And most people that I've received coins from have used it also. The coins arrive looking like new. :ph34r:

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And I use the bubble pack envelopes with no additional weight added around the coin :huh:

That seems like the easyest way, and it also works fine, since i've received several coins at the other side of the ocean (The Netherlands) that where packaged that way.

The other methods might be a lot of work if you'll have to ship 1000 coins...

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Just be careful not to let the tape touch the coin. I have several whose finish is now marred by tape residue that won't seem to come off. :huh:

Ya, I agree....that's why I pre-wrap the coin in a couple of layers of newspaper, that way there won't be any tape touching the coin or the plastic sleeve. This only adds a minimal amount of weight even when sandwiched between light card material. After receiving a shipment which had all the plastic sleeves taped together leaving a gooey mess, I've decided not to ever repeat that method.

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Ya, I agree....that's why I pre-wrap the coin in a couple of layers of newspaper, that way there  won't be any tape touching the coin or the plastic sleeve. This only adds a minimal amount of weight even when sandwiched between light card material. After receiving a shipment which had all the plastic sleeves taped together leaving a gooey mess, I've decided not to ever repeat that method.

You and I must have gotten the same coins. My plastic sleeves are still sticky. :huh:

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Ya, I agree....that's why I pre-wrap the coin in a couple of layers of newspaper, that way there  won't be any tape touching the coin or the plastic sleeve. This only adds a minimal amount of weight even when sandwiched between light card material. After receiving a shipment which had all the plastic sleeves taped together leaving a gooey mess, I've decided not to ever repeat that method.

You and I must have gotten the same coins. My plastic sleeves are still sticky. :huh:

Ya, I finally gave up trying to clean those up, and just wrapped them in Saran Wrap. Thats keeping them from sticking together.

Edited by Go JayBee
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I have to admit that I've been guilty of poor shiping practice multiple times, however....

 

1. When shipping the Calgary Coins, buying a bubble envelope for each order would have added quite a bit to everything. Overall there were 78 people that I shipped to. That is a whole lot of bubble envelopes. (and at least where I'm looking they don't come cheap).

 

2. Of the coins I shipped out, one order went AWOL (no idea when/where/how).

 

3. Hadn't thought about the 'gooey mess' issue. Hope the Calgary ones weren't too bad... Since the main order, I've been sending out trades in vinyl sleeves (bought seperately). I've more or less been considering these as disposable, as you can buy them en-mass from a coin place for pretty cheap (and that way all your coin envelopes match and don't say kvcoins on them).

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We send out our coins in a bubble-wrap-padded envelope.

 

Each coin is now also wrapped in B-wrap. This serves 2 purposes:

1) More protection

 

2) Allows the envelope to meet the 3/4-inch depth requirement for Delivery Confirmatio.

 

We have always used DC, and it is worth it. So far, only one package didn't make it to it's destination. That cacher contacted me, we looked up the DC number, and found out that it was on its way back to us.

 

That's when we learned about the 3/4-inch rule.

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We send out our coins in a bubble-wrap-padded envelope.

 

Each coin is now also wrapped in B-wrap. This serves 2 purposes:

1) More protection

 

2) Allows the envelope to meet the 3/4-inch depth requirement for Delivery Confirmatio.

 

We have always used DC, and it is worth it. So far, only one package didn't make it to it's destination. That cacher contacted me, we looked up the DC number, and found out that it was on its way back to us.

 

That's when we learned about the 3/4-inch rule.

So if you hadn't used DC it would have gotten there the first time? :laughing::ph34r:

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So if you hadn't used DC it would have gotten there the first time? B)B)

No, If I had known that to use DC, the package is supposed to be 3/4-inch thick, it would have gotten there. --Smart aleck-- It's always nice if the Post Office tells you everything you need to know in the first place.

 

And, it's nice to believe in the Easter Bunny.... B)

 

The good news is, this package was going to ladycacher, and she was more than willing to be patient while this got ironed out.

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I recycle all my envelopes that I receive ( as long as they are padded ), I stamp the envelope so you know it is from me (custom Damenace stamp), and then try to add some sort of signature item. I then use enough packing tape around the envelope to make it virtually impossible to accidentally get cut open and the coin be lost ( those who I have traded with can probably tell you horror stories of getting the envelope open). I have yet to have a problem that I am aware of when the coin gets to its destination.

 

It is fair to say that you should never use a regular envelope as a method of shipping, it is not sturdy enough even if cardboard is used inside.

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For the coins that I have shipped I put up to six coins in a #6 coin envelope purchased at Staples, and then put that envelope in a paper/bubble wrap Duck mailer. For larger orders I use the Tuffgard tear resistant bubble wrap mailers, these work very well for up to 25 or so coins. Above that I use a $7.70 flat rate box from USPS.

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Hi,

 

This is an interesting thread, but I have a question that hasn't been touched on yet...

 

I will soon be receiving an order of 1000 trackable wooden coins, and will be shipping them out in varying amounts from 1-100 (or more)...does anyone have experience and/or advice on how to ship wooden coins so as to avoid the shipping costs exceeding the costs of the coins?

 

Thanks,

 

nfa-jamie

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Hi,

 

This is an interesting thread, but I have a question that hasn't been touched on yet...

 

I will soon be receiving an order of 1000 trackable wooden coins, and will be shipping them out in varying amounts from 1-100 (or more)...does anyone have experience and/or advice on how to ship wooden coins so as to avoid the shipping costs exceeding the costs of the coins?

 

Thanks,

 

nfa-jamie

I don't how your going to avoid that on 1, but you might be able to make out allright sending 100 using 1st Class. Even Bulk Rate Priority will only cost ya $3.85. Just make sure to include some postage in the price. Or, if your trading...the folks on the other end have to spend something on postage...so what the heck, its the cost of collecting.

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Hi!

 

I just ordered a quantity of these for mailing coins:

Safety_Mailer.jpg

 

I found them at this web site: http://www.jpscorner.com

In the navigation menu on the left, under "Things You Need" click "Safety Mailer".

 

Sounds like the perfect thing for protecting coins while in transit. :D

The carboard has adhesive that only sticks to itself - not the coins.

The safety mailers plus a padded envelope ought to be great. I'll report back.

Edited by 9Key
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I recycle the bubble envelopes also. I carefully pull off the previous name and add my label. I wrap my coins in a foam wrap that I got free from work. It is the foam wrapping the manufacturer uses on Seat Lift Chairs and can probably be found if you check with local stores in your area. Then the foam wrapped coin is put in a bubble envelope and mailed for 60 cents.

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I recycle the bubble envelopes also.  I carefully pull off the previous name and add my label.  I wrap my coins in a foam wrap that I got free from work.  It is the foam wrapping the manufacturer uses on Seat Lift Chairs and can probably be found if you check with local stores in your area. Then the foam wrapped coin is put in a bubble envelope and mailed for 60 cents.

I have been recycling the bubble envelopes as well. Except I'm using them to house the coins inside of a new bubble mailer. I use a stapler to create a secure pouch. Keeps the package very light, but adds that extra padding. Some of you will see that technique when you receive your packages which are being sent out this week.

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The first few coins I traded/shipped out were in bubble mailers which seemed to work pretty good. However since the middle of Sep the rules up here in Canada have changed and mailing something like coin in a bubble mailer now incurs a minimum cost of about $9.00 for each one. This is way too expensive for me to even consider mailing them out like that. While it is the preferred method it's just not practical.

 

I have found that a rigid photo mailer (I get them at Staples) however can work almost as good. I wrap the coin up in some paper towel to give it a bit more cushion and stop it from moving around inside the mailer.

 

I tried it on a couple of local deliveries first and it seemed to work fine. At least I can afford to mail a coin out this way.

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Please please PLEASE

 

follow Jaybee's packing suggestions !!

 

Today I received a package that started with three heavy loose coins in it and arrived at my mailbox with two and the end popped open. It hadn't been taped shut to begin with and the USPS slamming around popped it loose. As a result I am missing a really precious personal coin. :anitongue:

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This is sorta on topic, but need some advice. I'm having a coin minted and am wondering how to charge overseas shipping. Is there a norm, or do you wait til the coin is in and find out actual shipping? This would be a second paypal payment since some coins will be pre-paid.

I almost always use the small Global Priority Mail flat-rate envelopes. It's a flat $5, $9 for the larger flat rate envelope. You have at least some idea how long it will take (assuming the postal service doesn't lose it entirely) and it's relatively cheap. Downsides: You can't print the postage online, you HAVE to go to a counter (at least I haven't found anywhere to do it online); If there's more than one coin in it, you have to tape the coins to something flat to keep the envelope as flat as possible (I use a padded mailer inside the USPS envelope); and you can't insure it.

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An article in the Tampa Tribune mentions that USPS doen't insure coins. I decided to check the USPS site on that. They DO insure coins - but proof of value for the coin must be determined by "A coin dealer" or "trade magazine". I mention this for the occasional high value coin coming thru Ebay. or private trade Evidently insuring it with USPS isn't going to work should it be lost.

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An article in the Tampa Tribune mentions that USPS doen't insure coins. I decided to check the USPS site on that. They DO insure coins - but proof of value for the coin must be determined by "A coin dealer" or "trade magazine". I mention this for the occasional high value coin coming thru Ebay. or private trade Evidently insuring it with USPS isn't going to work should it be lost.

I am sure the USPS does not consider a geocoin to be a coin. It's just a trinket to them :) Or a token or a medallion or ...

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The gist of the Tamp Trib article is that it really doesn't matter what you CALL them, if you're trying to collect on insurance from the USPS there can be problems. The reporter interviewed a number of very unhappy USPS users who learned of the "fine print" requirements in the insurance when they tried to file claims. I expect the token/medallion/trinket etc wording wouldn't alter the fact of needing a "dealer or trade magazine" assessment of current value.

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