Jump to content

The Ten Essentials,


rusty_tlc
Followers 2

Recommended Posts

Many who hike frequently are familiar with "The ten essentials" those items you should always have with you when you venture away from the parking lot for even a day hike. If this is new to you here is a basic list:

1. Map

2. Compass

3. Flashlight / Headlamp

4. Extra Food

5. Extra Clothes

6. First-Aid Kit

7. Pocket Knife

8. Waterproof Matches

9. Water / Filter / Bottles

10. Whistle

 

Each member (except small children) should carry their own ten.

 

If you are just getting started geocaching you may have never ventured far from the beaten track. In this case it is well worth your while to invest the time and money to assemble your own ten essentials and become familiar with how to use them should the need arise.

 

In looking over the list the other day I considered how it might vary slightly to fit different seasons/climates. For instance I would swap extra clothes for a small tarp and increase the amount of water I carry if heading to the desert. Water filters would be virtually useless there so they would stay home. This got me wondering what other people consider the ten essentials.

 

So I'm asking what are your ten essentials? Please don't list every thing you lug around including anti-tank assault weapons, just the bare bones survival equipment.

 

And please, please, please no discussion of the merits/liability of side arms.

Link to comment
Did some one say:

1) Batteries and more batteries.

2) FRS radio or other  type.

3) Caching companion.

4) Caching boodie.

5) Travel Bugs that youforgot about.

 

I'll add more later!

SF1

 

edited to add # 4 & 5

I was really looking more for essential items. Stuff that could save your life in an emergency.

Edited by rusty_tlc
Link to comment
Did some one say:

1) Batteries and more batteries.

2) FRS radio or other  type.

3) Caching companion.

4) Caching boodie.

5) Travel Bugs that you forgot about.

 

I'll add more later!

SF1

 

edited to add # 4 & 5

I was really looking more for essential items. Stuff that could save your life in an emergency.

 

Sorry, Ok I’ll cancel # 4 & 5.

SF1

Link to comment
I don't have a top 10 at the moment, but you might add one of those really compact shiney thermal blankets.  The easily fit into yoru pack and could save you if you need to hold in some body heat.

Black trash bags will work in a pinch. Cheaper too. Just borrow one from your neighbor if you don't have any of these multi purpose machines. ;)

Link to comment
I don't have a top 10 at the moment, but you might add one of those really compact shiney thermal blankets. The easily fit into yoru pack and could save you if you need to hold in some body heat.

So you would replace the extra clothing with a space blanket?

In the Serrias I always carry a poncho or black plastic bag. Staying dry helps prevent hypothermia and T-Storms can blow up out of nowhere in the mountains. In my book keeping dry is as good as extra clothes.

Link to comment
I don't have a top 10 at the moment, but you might add one of those really compact shiney thermal blankets.  The easily fit into yoru pack and could save you if you need to hold in some body heat.

Black trash bags will work in a pinch. Cheaper too. Just borrow one from your neighbor if you don't have any of these multi purpose machines. ;)

Great minds and all that. :D

Link to comment

I was always taught what was called the "Rule of Three" - it doesn't always hold true but it does give priorties when packing. A) In most conditions, you can survive 3 weeks without food ;) In most climates, you can survive 3 days without water. C) Unless it is summer, you can only survive 3 hours without proper clothing and/or shelter. So keeping that in mind, I carry:

 

1) GPS and at least 2 sets of spare batteries

2) a map of the area

3) 2 of the emergency "space" blankets

4) waterproof matches and a lighter

5) Large pocket knife

6) Cell phone and/or HT ham radio

7) First Aid Kit

8) emergency poncho

9) 20 to 40 Oz of water

10) potable water tablets

11) Whistle

12) ALWAYS let someone know where you are going and when you will be back!

 

Not much different from the original but my take on it

Link to comment

Rather than carrying a water filter, carry a small bottle of iodine tablets. They may give the water an odd flavour, but, when used properly, they will kill everything that might be in the water. Sure, they won't necessarily clean out things like small particles of dirt in the water, but the amount of dirt you might get is small enough that it shouldn't be a problem. Additionally, now you don't have to carry the filter, and a bottle of iodine tablets weighs a couple of ounces, whereas a good water filter (that will match the iodine's effectiveness) weighs several pounds.

Link to comment
I was always taught what was called the "Rule of Three" - it doesn't always hold true but it does give priorties when packing. A) In most conditions, you can survive 3 weeks without food ;) In most climates, you can survive 3 days without water. C) Unless it is summer, you can only survive 3 hours without proper clothing and/or shelter. So keeping that in mind, I carry:

 

1) GPS and at least 2 sets of spare batteries

2) a map of the area

3) 2 of the emergency "space" blankets

4) waterproof matches and a lighter

5) Large pocket knife

6) Cell phone and/or HT ham radio

7) First Aid Kit

8) emergency poncho

9) 20 to 40 Oz of water

10) potable water tablets

11) Whistle

12) ALWAYS let someone know where you are going and when you will be back!

 

Not much different from the original but my take on it

That's exactly what I'm talking about. Your take on the ten essentials.

Link to comment
Rather than carrying a water filter, carry a small bottle of iodine tablets. They may give the water an odd flavour, but, when used properly, they will kill everything that might be in the water. Sure, they won't necessarily clean out things like small particles of dirt in the water, but the amount of dirt you might get is small enough that it shouldn't be a problem. Additionally, now you don't have to carry the filter, and a bottle of iodine tablets weighs a couple of ounces, whereas a good water filter (that will match the iodine's effectiveness) weighs several pounds.

A bandana folded in four will filter most of the big chunks out.

Link to comment
Did some one say:

I was really looking more for essential items. Stuff that could save your life in an emergency.

I you have the list created by the Seattle Mountaineers many many years ago, has it been that long sigh. Any way the thing you need to up forth most is the KNOWLEDGE to use these items. If you have a compass and don't know which end id the north arrow or can't triangulate using map and compass then they are usless. If you don't know how to build a shelter or what to do with a mirror etc. An NO Virginia there is NO such thing as COMMON KNOWLEDGE. So if your going in the woods then carry what you need for the woods but the 10 essentials in downtown LA are a bit obserd. Just my thoughts

cheers

Link to comment

My essentials?

 

GPS (duh) with starting waypoint marked

compass

first aid kit (don't forget those anti-diarreal pills!!!)

iodine tablets (for drinking water)

2 flashlights

rope

cell phone

multi-tool

whistle

emergency blanket

poncho

 

ok, thats 11, (12 if you count each flashlight) I guess the cell phone could be omitted if you're in an area with no service...

Link to comment
Did some one say:

I was really looking more for essential items. Stuff that could save your life in an emergency.

I you have the list created by the Seattle Mountaineers many many years ago, has it been that long sigh. Any way the thing you need to up forth most is the KNOWLEDGE to use these items. If you have a compass and don't know which end id the north arrow or can't triangulate using map and compass then they are usless. If you don't know how to build a shelter or what to do with a mirror etc. An NO Virginia there is NO such thing as COMMON KNOWLEDGE. So if your going in the woods then carry what you need for the woods but the 10 essentials in downtown LA are a bit obserd. Just my thoughts

cheers

...

If you are just getting started geocaching you may have never ventured far from the beaten track. In this case it is well worth your while to invest the time and money to assemble your own ten essentials and become familiar with how to use them should the need arise.....

You are absolutely correct, a first aid kit you don't know how to use is ineffective. Same as with a map and compass.

 

Downtown LA has it's own list of ten essentials I'm sure. ;) That's one of the things I'm interested in is hearing what the ten are for different places.

Link to comment

Uh . . . didn't anyone mention T.P. or Kleenex ;) . . . in a ziplock bag. That is one of my essentials.

 

The other day it was cold and windy and I needed the tissue for my runny nose, but you never know what else you need it for :D

 

. . . depending on how long you are out in the boonies.

Link to comment
My essentials?

 

GPS (duh) with starting waypoint marked

compass

first aid kit (don't forget those anti-diarreal pills!!!)

iodine tablets (for drinking water)

2 flashlights

rope

cell phone

multi-tool

whistle

emergency blanket

poncho

 

ok, thats 11, (12 if you count each flashlight) I guess the cell phone could be omitted if you're in an area with no service...

Interesting that you list rope but not food. Why is that?

It has been pointed out that we can live for weeks without food, but in my experience people begin to exhibit poor judgment after 10 or 12 hours without anything to eat. Our society is used to eating on a regular basis, psychologically we have problems when we skip a few meals.

Link to comment
Uh . . . didn't anyone mention T.P. or Kleenex ;) . . . in a ziplock bag. That is one of my essentials.

 

The other day it was cold and windy and I needed the tissue for my runny nose, but you never know what else you need it for :D

 

. . . depending on how long you are out in the boonies.

You need to learn how to "Farmer John". :D

A crude but effective way to blow your nose w/o tissues. Block one nostrile by laying your finger along side your nose and pressing, lean slightly forward and exhale forcefully through your nose. Not recomended in the board room but accetable on the trail. :lol:

Link to comment
My essentials?

 

GPS (duh) with starting waypoint marked

compass

first aid kit (don't forget those anti-diarreal pills!!!)

iodine tablets (for drinking water)

2 flashlights

rope

cell phone

multi-tool

whistle

emergency blanket

poncho

 

ok, thats 11, (12 if you count each flashlight) I guess the cell phone could be omitted if you're in an area with no service...

Interesting that you list rope but not food. Why is that?

It has been pointed out that we can live for weeks without food, but in my experience people begin to exhibit poor judgment after 10 or 12 hours without anything to eat. Our society is used to eating on a regular basis, psychologically we have problems when we skip a few meals.

I do usually take food and some extras with me - I just don't consider food an "essential" - I hope to be long since out of there before food becomes an issue!!!. Most of my "essentials" are geared toward shelter and getting me home quickly.

Link to comment
Interesting that you list rope but not food. Why is that?...

Dude, there's a McD's on every corner. ;)

:D I saw your list. A quick look at your recent finds leads me to think they are right and correct for you. One question why a jeep? A Saturn will get you to that parking lot micro for a lot less in gas. :D

Link to comment
...

Interesting that you list rope but not food. Why is that?

It has been pointed out that we can live for weeks without food, but in my experience people begin to exhibit poor judgment after 10 or 12 hours without anything to eat. Our society is used to eating on a regular basis, psychologically we have problems when we skip a few meals.

I do usually take food and some extras with me - I just don't consider food an "essential" - I hope to be long since out of there before food becomes an issue!!!. Most of my "essentials" are geared toward shelter and getting me home quickly.

Thats cool if it works out for you. I feel more comfortable knowing I have an energy bar tucked away for an emergency. It's all in the mind. In fact survival is almost all about the mind.

Link to comment

Sbell11's list is much closer to what I usually need-- I do a lot of my geocaching in city parks and urban caches/micros (because that's where I live!)

 

Anyway, I'd add a flashlight-- you'd be amazed at how handy they are, even in daylight, for spotting a wiley hide. And a ruler or some other sturdy stick, for getting a microcache down from a ledge or prying up a hiding spot that's gotten stuck.

 

The cell phone, of course, is for holding to your ear as camouflage!

Link to comment

In no particular order:

 

1. printout of the cache or benchmark

2. GPS

3. map of the local area

4. swag bag for trades

5. H2O

6. my car keys (I cant tell you how many times I was so excited to start a cache only to look and see my car keys sitting still in the ignition...DOH!) OK, it has happened 3 times...thank God for AAA.

7. lensatic compass for backup so if all else fails, I can at least get back to the car

8. a working pen

9. my fully-stocked backpack

10. batteries!!

Link to comment
In no particular order:

 

1. printout of the cache or benchmark

2. GPS

3. map of the local area

4. swag bag for trades

5. H2O

6. my car keys (I cant tell you how many times I was so excited to start a cache only to look and see my car keys sitting still in the ignition...DOH!) OK, it has happened 3 times...thank God for AAA.

7. lensatic compass for backup so if all else fails, I can at least get back to the car

8. a working pen

9. my fully-stocked backpack

10. batteries!!

I'm trying to figure out how some of this stuff is essential.

Link to comment

Interesting that you list rope but not food. Why is that?

It has been pointed out that we can live for weeks without food, but in my experience people begin to exhibit poor judgment after 10 or 12 hours without anything to eat. Our society is used to eating on a regular basis, psychologically we have problems when we skip a few meals.

Hmmm..."Our society is used to eating on a regular basis..." That statement is what we call "over-generalization". I am not skinny by any means, so I got some fat stored away for future use!, hehe. But aside from that, I am comfortable going a full day or more without much to eat...I usually eat before I go caching, too. Sure, I guess I might be in trouble if I was lost in the woods for more than a few days...But that's not likely here, even in the sparsly populated areas of NE Mississippi. Besides, if all else fails, insects are high in protein!!!

Link to comment

Interesting that you list rope but not food. Why is that?

It has been pointed out that we can live for weeks without food, but in my experience people begin to exhibit poor judgment after 10 or 12 hours without anything to eat. Our society is used to eating on a regular basis, psychologically we have problems when we skip a few meals.

Hmmm..."Our society is used to eating on a regular basis..." That statement is what we call "over-generalization". I am not skinny by any means, so I got some fat stored away for future use!, hehe. But aside from that, I am comfortable going a full day or more without much to eat...I usually eat before I go caching, too. Sure, I guess I might be in trouble if I was lost in the woods for more than a few days...But that's not likely here, even in the sparsly populated areas of NE Mississippi. Besides, if all else fails, insects are high in protein!!!

A generalization maybe, but given the obesity rate in this country I wouldn't say overly generalized. As I mentioned in later post I think it's more of a mental thing than physical. And if you are okay not throwing an extra candy/energy bar in your pack that's okay with me.

 

So what about the rope? Why is it essential to you?

Link to comment

A generalization maybe, but given the obesity rate in this country I wouldn't say overly generalized. As I mentioned in later post I think it's more of a mental thing than physical. And if you are okay not throwing an extra candy/energy bar in your pack that's okay with me.

 

So what about the rope? Why is it essential to you?

rope is useful for so many things...wrap it around a limb (arm, leg) to control bleeding, may it occur...I've actually used it to climb small steep embankments/hills, just find a sturdy tree/limb to throw it around.

 

Tie it between two trees, drape emergency blanket over...voila, a small tent!

 

Rope can also be used to make a snare for small game, should the desire for fresh meat strike your fancy...etc.

 

rope can be used for many things, just as valuable as duct tape...which I also carry with me.

 

Here's a duct tape hint...Use duct tape instead of a bandaid...A little bit of antibacterial ointment on the wound, then a small piece of cloth over that (piece of a shirt, hankerchief, etc) then wrap it with duct tape. In the summer months, I tent to "sweat off" bandaids, so a good wrapping of duct tape (not too tight!) works much better.

I learned that when I used to put up duct work for A/C units in unfinished houses. duct is made of sheet metal, so we got many cuts, and had the duct tape handy!

Link to comment

On all the other forums I visit.... I would have seen the following in the essentials list

 

* Extra Mags

* Ammo

* A big knife

* More mags

* More ammo

* Parachute cord

* Zombie Survival Kit

* More Ammo

* More Mags

* Water

* More mags

* Back up Gun

* Mags and Ammo for Back Up..

 

Anytime I'm in the wilderness thats pretty much the list I follow no matter what I'm doing. =X

Link to comment
On all the other forums I visit.... I would have seen the following in the essentials list

 

* Extra Mags

* Ammo

* A big knife

* More mags

* More ammo

* Parachute cord

* Zombie Survival Kit

* More Ammo

* More Mags

* Water

* More mags

* Back up Gun

* Mags and Ammo for Back Up..

 

Anytime I'm in the wilderness thats pretty much the list I follow no matter what I'm doing. =X

That's ...... disturbing. :o

Please keep on topic and realistic, thanks.

Edited by rusty_tlc
Link to comment

This is my list which complements my Caching essentials list...

 

1 Knife

2 Flashlight plus spare batteries and bulb

3 Broad area map, waterproofed

4 Compass (backup)

5 Whistle

6 Heliostat (signal mirror)

7 First aid kit

8 Personal meds and spare glasses

9 Insect repellant (DEET and permethrin)

10 Sun Block

11 Fire making kit with tender, candle and three means of making fire

12 Rain gear (usually anorak or poncho)

13 Extra clothes, esp. hat, gloves, socks

14 Extra food and means to procure and prepare

15 Extra water and means to purify

16 Cell phone

17 Altoids survival kit

18 Large contractor bags

19 Milspec. parachute "550" cord

20 Duct tape

21 Tarp or ground sheet

Link to comment
On all the other forums I visit.... I would have seen the following in the essentials list

 

* Extra Mags

* Ammo

* A big knife

* More mags

* More ammo

* Parachute cord

* Zombie Survival Kit

* More Ammo

* More Mags

* Water

* More mags

* Back up Gun

* Mags and Ammo for Back Up..

 

Anytime I'm in the wilderness thats pretty much the list I follow no matter what I'm doing. =X

That's ...... disturbing. :rolleyes:

Please keep on topic and realistic, thanks.

everything was realistic for some people... except the zombie kit... but then I know some whackos that the zombie kit would be realistic for as well..

 

thanks

Link to comment

Just love looking at lists. I'm a list person. When I go caching...

 

1. Attach head

2. Screw on tight (lefty loosie, righty tighty)

3. Bring an extra pen

 

After 4000 caches the fanny pack regularly contains these 10 essentials:

 

1. Garmin Venture

2. Recharged NiMH, pair

3. Digital camera, w/ 128 card

4. Cell phone

5. Palm PDA, maybe, cache page otherwise

6. Leatherman Squirt or Swiss Classic

7. Gu energy gel

8. Bandaids and wipes, maybe poison ivy wipes

9. ATM card (rule-- if w/in 200 ft of ATM, get cash now)

10. Space pen or pen from the Marriot or pen from work

Link to comment
10. Space pen or pen from the Marriot or pen from work

You can get Uni-Ball PowerTank pressurized pens in three colors now (Black, Blue and Red) at Office Max and Office Depot for around $6.99 for 3. They work great and you don't get so bummed if you lose one.

 

--Marky

Link to comment

hmmm. most of my caching excursions are city parks and don't require much at all.

when i do venture out of town i tend to bring this stuff, in no particular order:

 

1. Leatherman Wave

2. Flashlight / extra AA batteries (for this and gps)

3. Gpsr

4. At least 40 oz. of water, more if the dog is with me. Although he seems to like creeks and puddles as much as bottled water.. :blink:

5. Wet Weather gear (pants and jacket. layers you know!)

6. Extra socks

7. Matches

8. Compass, and yes i know how to use it.

9. Map

10. rope. paracord or climbing, depending on where i'm off to.

11. extra dog food/snacks/dehydrated fruit/energy bars

12. minor first aid kit, mainly for antibacterial gel etc..

13. pen/pencil

14. some extra ziploc freezer bags, and grocery plastic bags if the dog is gonna be with me. (CITO AND CIPO!!) because you don't know love until you've carried someone's, um, stuff, 7 miles down a mountain...

15. need to add a couple of space blankets.

16. hatchet or Gerber retractable saw (depending)

17. frs radios if with a buddy

 

out of all of this, about the only things i routinely ever grab for are:

batteries and water.

with first aid, band aids tend to be fairly useless for me, and if something serious comes up, it's not going to be helped by the contents of the usual stuff i carry.

i've managed thus far without serious trouble, and get more cautious in my old age.

i'm sure i could add a couple of others without burdening myself. (like a whistle.)

but this is pretty standard.

i am going to get my dog one of the over the back bags soon though, so he can carry his share when we go out. (slacker!!)

Link to comment
Many who hike frequently are familiar with "The ten essentials" those items you should always have with you when you venture away from the parking lot for even a day hike. If this is new to you here is a basic list:

1. Map

2. Compass

3. Flashlight / Headlamp

4. Extra Food

5. Extra Clothes

6. First-Aid Kit

7. Pocket Knife

8. Waterproof Matches

9. Water / Filter / Bottles

10. Whistle

 

Each member (except small children) should carry their own ten.

 

If you are just getting started geocaching you may have never ventured far from the beaten track. In this case it is well worth your while to invest the time and money to assemble your own ten essentials and become familiar with how to use them should the need arise.

 

In looking over the list the other day I considered how it might vary slightly to fit different seasons/climates. For instance I would swap extra clothes for a small tarp and increase the amount of water I carry if heading to the desert. Water filters would be virtually useless there so they would stay home. This got me wondering what other people consider the ten essentials.

 

So I'm asking what are your ten essentials? Please don't list every thing you lug around including anti-tank assault weapons, just the bare bones survival equipment.

 

And please, please, please no discussion of the merits/liability of side arms.

A microwave and 24 bags of popcorn.

Link to comment
Sbell11's list is much closer to what I usually need-- I do a lot of my geocaching in city parks and urban caches/micros (because that's where I live!)

 

The cell phone....

Ditto for me, too.

Except that you use the GPSr as the cell phone in a cover up situation, silly!

 

My list is really simple.

1. My swag bag - in it is extra items for cache maintenance (Baggies, log books, pens), extra batteries in case something craps out, and a flashlight

 

2. My GPSr.

Link to comment
Sbell11's list is much closer to what I usually need-- I do a lot of my geocaching in city parks and urban caches/micros (because that's where I live!)

 

The cell phone....

Ditto for me, too.

Except that you use the GPSr as the cell phone in a cover up situation, silly!

 

My list is really simple.

1. My swag bag - in it is extra items for cache maintenance (Baggies, log books, pens), extra batteries in case something craps out, and a flashlight

 

2. My GPSr.

But what do you carry to get you out of trouble?

My "in Town" ten

1) Cell Phone

2) AAA card

3) $20 in cash (ATM isn't always an option)

4) Microman

5) Extra jacket/parka

<in the car all the time>

6) Jumper cables

7) Change

8) Tool kit

9) Icemelt

10) Folding shovel

Link to comment

Wipes. :ph34r:

 

Hey, don't knock it. I went through two emergency sessions with kids before I learned about this essential.

 

I always have in my caching bag:

 

1. Batteries

2. Wipes

3. Tool/knife thingy

4. Fingernail clippers

5. Carmex

6. Snake bite kit

7. Flashlight

8. Scissors

 

I need to add a few other things:

 

1. Water

2. Emergency blanket

3. Band-aids/first aid kit

 

Still working on it.

Link to comment
Sbell11's list is much closer to what I usually need-- I do a lot of my geocaching in city parks and urban caches/micros (because that's where I live!)

 

The cell phone....

Ditto for me, too.

Except that you use the GPSr as the cell phone in a cover up situation, silly!

No one around here would be caught dead with a cell phone as large as my eTrex anymore.

 

Plus, the cell is handy for taking pics of me near the cache site for posting logs. Now if I would only remember to actually do that.... <_<

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 2
×
×
  • Create New...