Jump to content

Another dog


drsolly
Followers 4

Recommended Posts

Ladysolly and I were walking along the footpath on our way to a cache, and we encountered a dog walker, with dog. The dog ran up to me and started its aggressive barking thing, so I just stood still and waited for it to go away, or for the owner to do something.

 

The owner, of course, called and yelled, the dog took no notice, and I carried on standing there, keeping an eye on the dog, because I don't want to be attacked from the rear.

 

Eventually, the owner reached where I was, and I told him "I think you should get your dog under control."

 

I was really surprised by his reaction. "Someone should get you under control!" he retorted. Huh? I was just standing there, not moving. Not shouting. Not being aggressive. "He's never done this before," he continued. I didn't tell him that the last time I heard that, it was just after I'd been bitten by an Alsatian. "You must have done something for him to react like that!" he said.

 

Well, I hadn't. I'd just stood there, waiting for the dog to go away, or get put on a lead, or something. But in his mind, his lovely furry friend had never barked at anyone before, therefore it must be my fault.

 

Eventually, he walked on, still unable to get his dog under control, and for a while afterwards, his dog was rushing back to have another bark at me, and I could hear the owner calling futilely to get him back.

 

I suspect that this is an accident waiting to happen.

Link to comment

Without question it is the dog owner that is at fault. Anyone owning a dog should take on their responsibility to train the dog. With a well trained dog, problems should not arise. I comment as a previous dog-owner for many years. Training took place at the appropriate young age and to a large extent the training was more relevant to the owner than the dog. The result - a happy and obedient dog and a relaxed and happy owner. Always a joy to take out - the owner as well! Rarely required a lead. No unnecessary barking. No unwanted jumping up at strangers. No over-exuberance in the company of younger humans. The dog is a pack animal and will respect and obey its pack leader. The humans responsibility is to ensure that their leadership is established when the dog is a puppy and then exercised in a responsible and correct manner. Do that and the relationship with the dog and with other humans will not be a problem. Don't train or establish who is leader and problems will always exist. There are some excellent dog-owners out there. Unfortunately there are also those who don't understand what they should be doing and perhaps never will.

Link to comment

I vividly remember a day in a park, doing a multi. There was a lady nearby, sitting on a bench and letting her little dog run loose. The dog was "playing" with a squirrel. It was kinda cute watching the small dog chasing the squirrel around (the owner was watching as well), until the dog managed to catch the squirrel. That wasn't a pretty sight at all.

Edited by dfx
Link to comment

Had a dog jump at my 9 year old daughter while out caching, so moved 'it' away gently with my leg only to be accused by the owner of 'kicking their dog'. Told them bluntly if it was under control I wouldn't have needed to do anything :mad:

 

Had it been my daughter I would most likely have pushed the dog once and then kicked it.

Link to comment

These compressed air cans are good to carry and squirt at dogs that come near you

http://www.moreforpets.ltd.uk/corrector-spray-p-1084.html?osCsid=av3t84isa3gtes5ba88aunmcr7

 

You don't have to be bitten for a dog to contravene the dangerous dogs act, even if you only fear that you will be bitten or hurt that is enough for the police to be involved. If a dog barked at you, made you jump back and you tripped over and hurt yourself that's enough for the owner to be prosecuted. A dog doesn't have to attack to be deemed dangerous. I don't think a lot of dog owners realise how far reaching the law is. We have quite well trained dogs and we're lucky enough to have enough space to exercise ours without taking them to public places but when they do go out they are never let off lead. It's just not worth the risk.

Link to comment

These compressed air cans are good to carry and squirt at dogs that come near you

http://www.moreforpets.ltd.uk/corrector-spray-p-1084.html?osCsid=av3t84isa3gtes5ba88aunmcr7

 

You don't have to be bitten for a dog to contravene the dangerous dogs act, even if you only fear that you will be bitten or hurt that is enough for the police to be involved. If a dog barked at you, made you jump back and you tripped over and hurt yourself that's enough for the owner to be prosecuted. A dog doesn't have to attack to be deemed dangerous. I don't think a lot of dog owners realise how far reaching the law is. We have quite well trained dogs and we're lucky enough to have enough space to exercise ours without taking them to public places but when they do go out they are never let off lead. It's just not worth the risk.

 

Next time a dog comes at me ('Oooh, he's only playing' is a favorite of mine) I'll ask the owner to get me a can of that as there's no reason I should pay out for other peoples lazyness.

 

On a slightly more serious note ... http://www.naturenet.net/law/dogs.html is a good read that I like to point people to. It does only apply to England and Wales though.

Link to comment

I agree, it's the dog owner, not the dog. Maybe it would be a good idea to have dog owners licences, that requires you to pass a dog ownership test before you're allowed to own a dog. A bit like a car driving test.

 

In the situation that happened yesterday, the owner got aggressive as soon as I opened my mouth. Maybe the dog learned its aggressiveness from the owner. And I don't believe the "He's never done that before".

 

I was very glad I had my walking pole with me. I didn't use it; I didn't even lift it off the ground. But I think an attacking dog would be thoroughly deterred if I did need to use it. Better than a can of air, with the disadvantage that the dog gets hurt, but that's a drawback I'm willing to accept, if need be.

Link to comment

The trouble is that inflicting pain on a dog causes either fight or flight, fine if it runs away but if it triggers a fight response you could be very badly bitten.

It's because I've been bitten when doing absolutely nothing to the dog, that my policy now is to defend myself if I need to. I'm not going to attack a dog, but neither am I going to stand still while being attacked.

Link to comment

The trouble is that inflicting pain on a dog causes either fight or flight, fine if it runs away but if it triggers a fight response you could be very badly bitten.

 

The advantage of a walking pole is that if you do end up in a full-on fight situation you can ram it down the dog's throat hard. I sincerely hope I never have to do such a thing but if I do end up in that kind of situation my goal is to neutralise the threat as fast as possible.

Link to comment

I wasn't suggesting that anyone should stand and be attacked, I was just trying to help by suggesting one solution. I don't have a problem with anyone defending themselves against an aggressive dog whichever way is chosen. Having been very badly mauled on one occasion and fended off numerous attacking dogs during my career, I would personally try and deter a dog by startling it before I would start a fight with it.

Link to comment

The advantage of a walking pole is that if you do end up in a full-on fight situation you can ram it down the dog's throat hard. I sincerely hope I never have to do such a thing but if I do end up in that kind of situation my goal is to neutralise the threat as fast as possible.

 

Another advantage of a walking pole is that you can hold it in such a way that suggests to the dog owner, who is a key player in such encounters, that you're ready and willing to hurt his furry friend, coupled with a request to "Control your dog or I will defend myself". I've found that this sometimes encourages the dog owner to stop saying "He's only playing" and start getting hold of his dog.

 

It's the dog owner who is the main problem, I think, not the dog.

Edited by drsolly
Link to comment

I wasn't suggesting that anyone should stand and be attacked, I was just trying to help by suggesting one solution. I don't have a problem with anyone defending themselves against an aggressive dog whichever way is chosen. Having been very badly mauled on one occasion and fended off numerous attacking dogs during my career, I would personally try and deter a dog by startling it before I would start a fight with it.

 

Sure, I'd rather deter a fight rather than engage an animal with sharp teeth and potentially sharp claws. That said you equally end up in a position where if you stand and fight you're dealing with lots of sharp weapons and if you run away you potentially trigger the dog's "hunt" response where it's likely to chase you anyway.

 

As drsolly says the problem is the owner rather than the dog, but our legal system doesn't provide for the dog to be retrained and the owner to be put down.

Link to comment

Am I the only one who is getting bored stiff of your dog stories? This is a geocaching forum, and if we all start banging on about problems with things that are not caching related whilst "out caching" then this forum will go downhill fast.

 

I suggest that you post your message in a dog related forum.

Link to comment

Personally, I quite enjoy the dog related stories that DrSolley posts, and like the debate that usually follows.

If it just makes one dog owner think about the behaviour of their dog when they are out and about caching, so much the better.

My dog is usually out with me when I am caching, and I have seen some really badly behaved dogs (and owners!) that approach us - "He (or she) just wants to play" is the cry of the out of control owner.

Link to comment

He was out caching.

We could all find ourselves in the same situation, with a dog barking at us and the owner saying "... Never done that before..."

 

I've not had problems with dogs, but understand that others do.

I was out caching the other day when a car raced past me going way too fast. I think we should all discuss irresponsible car drivers ad nauseum as well. <_< Or maybe we should do as Stuey suggests and stick to the true subject of these forums.

Link to comment

I often meet dogs running ahead of their owners on a footpath; they usually bound straight past, perhaps pausing momentarily for a quick sniff. Since I don't remember the last time one gave me trouble, I'd guess <5% of my dog encounters are bad. I assume that's the norm for most of us, though perhaps not for drsolly and trampyjoe.

 

drsolly & trampyjoe - what % of your dog encounters are disagreeable?

Link to comment

As a dog owner, I agree it is up to the owner to take responsibility of their pets actions. I have a new newfie (large breed) puppy and I let him off the lead quite a bit during our walks as I have been working with him until our puppy training classes start (this week BTW :) ). However, he is still a puppy and sometimes loves attention from anyone (especially children) who will give it. He recently came up upon a child and wanted to introduce himself. The child didn't see it like that and got upset. I quickly grabbed his harness and told him to sit, which he did. I apologized to both the mother and the child. The mother took my apology and didn't seem too upset by the incident and was trying to console and tell her child that it's only a puppy (a big one) and that no harm was done. However, it could have been differently with the Mother. Still it was my fault for allowing him to approach the child without permission from the mother and the child while under more control.

Link to comment

Am I the only one who is getting bored stiff of your dog stories? This is a geocaching forum, and if we all start banging on about problems with things that are not caching related whilst "out caching" then this forum will go downhill fast.

 

I suggest that you post your message in a dog related forum.

 

I'm sure it isn't difficult to spot the threads that have "drsolly" as the starter and "dog" in the title and, you know, not click on them or something.

Link to comment

He was out caching.

We could all find ourselves in the same situation, with a dog barking at us and the owner saying "... Never done that before..."

 

I've not had problems with dogs, but understand that others do.

I was out caching the other day when a car raced past me going way too fast. I think we should all discuss irresponsible car drivers ad nauseum as well. <_< Or maybe we should do as Stuey suggests and stick to the true subject of these forums.

Ooooh don't even get me started on the standard of driving these days!!!

 

I often meet dogs running ahead of their owners on a footpath; they usually bound straight past, perhaps pausing momentarily for a quick sniff. Since I don't remember the last time one gave me trouble, I'd guess <5% of my dog encounters are bad. I assume that's the norm for most of us, though perhaps not for drsolly and trampyjoe.

 

drsolly & trampyjoe - what % of your dog encounters are disagreeable?

 

% before I moved (and discovered geocaching) about 50

% after I moved about 10

 

Where I used to live and go walking there were a higher number of dog owners who didn't have a clue for some reason and after being attacked, jumped on, barked at and 'played' with My fear of dogs increased to a level where I didn't want to go walking anymore. Now I'm slowly getting over that fear but only because I force myself to go out and try to ignore dogs.

Link to comment
% before I moved (and discovered geocaching) about 50

% after I moved about 10

Ah, yes, my <5% was from rural encounters. I'm sure it would be different in the urban wastelands.

 

I have a hypothesis that something about Dr Solly gives him the appearance of a doggie chew-toy. I'm secretly hoping he'll post a high disagreeable-encounters percentage so I can smugly recommend he goes on a course.

Link to comment

Am I the only one who is getting bored stiff of your dog stories? This is a geocaching forum, and if we all start banging on about problems with things that are not caching related whilst "out caching" then this forum will go downhill fast.

 

I suggest that you post your message in a dog related forum.

I live thousands of miles away. I could easily IGNORE the clearly titled dog encounter posts by this OP. I could have ignored your post as well. I simply made a choice not to. When you open a container marked SKIM MILK, do you expect to find FINE CHEESE inside? I find these discussions to be quite interesting. I have read them all and will continue to do so. I know exactly what to expect when I click on them so I am never bored silly, bored to tears, bored to death or even bored stiff. All Groundspeak forums are well moderated and are in no danger of going downhill at any speed.

 

I suggest you get a grip.

Link to comment
% before I moved (and discovered geocaching) about 50

% after I moved about 10

Ah, yes, my <5% was from rural encounters. I'm sure it would be different in the urban wastelands.

 

I have a hypothesis that something about Dr Solly gives him the appearance of a doggie chew-toy. I'm secretly hoping he'll post a high disagreeable-encounters percentage so I can smugly recommend he goes on a course.

 

I'd guess my percentage of disagreeable-encounters is pretty low. Many dogs are on leads, and so they don't get a chance to misbehave, many dogs are well trained, and of those that aren't, I'd guess that a large percentage aren't interested in me. I was out all day today, I'd estimate that I had maybe ten dog encounters (maybe half of them were on leads), and apart from one that did a bit of a jump-up at me (possibly in a friendly way), they were all good.

 

I've been told by some dog owners in the past, that wearing a hat sets their dog off, and I usually wear a hat (and when biking, I always wear a helmet). And a few have told me that carrying a walking pole sets their dog off, and I usually walk with a walking pole. I also have a shoulder bag - is it possible that dogs are triggered by shoulder bags? I don't know.

 

I don't think I look like a doggie chew toy. Next time you see me, you might give me your opinion on that.

Link to comment

it might not be that Dr Solly looks like a dog chew - I think dogs use their sense of smell more than their sense of sight...

Ahaaaa, so The Doc smells like a dog chew then? That will be your problem Alan.

Can I suggest you rub yourself down with a bag of slugs before you leave Solly Towers in the morning?

Link to comment

Be interesting to see what type of dogs seem to dislike the good Doctor - we might be able to narrow down whether he smells like a chew, or looks like one :unsure:

Or both. Or maybe I dress like a chew. Or make noises like a chew?

 

OK - I'll tell you what. In the spirit of scientific enquiry, if everyone brings their dogs to the next event that I'm at, and I'll offer each dog a nice juicy leg. Some dogs will be blindfolded, and some will be nosebagged, so we can see which of their senses they use. All dogs that refuse the bait will be given a doggie-treat (you also have to bring the treat).

Link to comment

Just out of interest are you in the habit of wearing a Lady Ga Ga style raw meat outfit ?

If so this could explain your regular confrontations with our [not your] 4 legged friends.

 

Hardly ever. Or raw vegetables.

 

Actually, I do like dogs. That is, I like dogs that approach me politely and say good afternoon, or take a sniff at my boots. What I don't like is the small percentage (probably less than 5%) of dogs that rush at me screaming threats, jumping up at me and showing what sharp teeth they have to bite me with, and I like even less dog owners who 1) don't care that their dogs behave that way and 2) think that it's somehow my fault that their dog wants to attack me and 3) say "He's just being friendly" or "He's just playing".

 

I like horses too. And cats, cows, sheep, pigs and rabbits.

 

Can anyone recommend a useful dog forum that I could post to? Maybe some dog owners need to have all this explained to them, but my ownership of a dog preceeded the existence of the internet, so I don't know where would be a good place to post.

Link to comment

 

Can anyone recommend a useful dog forum that I could post to? Maybe some dog owners need to have all this explained to them, but my ownership of a dog preceeded the existence of the internet, so I don't know where would be a good place to post.

 

I reckon that the type of dog owners that would frequent a doggy forum are the type that would not have troublesome dogs.

 

But just because my daughter woke me up early and I can't get back to sleep (she however is in her pushchair snoring loudly!)... http://www.dogownerforum.com/

http://www.dogfriendlybritain.co.uk/

http://www.dogchat.co.uk/

and my personal favorite (mainly cos I read it as 'dogging mania') http://www.dogomania.com/forum.php

 

Some people obviously have strange hobbies.

Link to comment

... I like even less dog owners who ... think that it's somehow my fault that their dog wants to attack me and 3) say "He's just being friendly" or "He's just playing".

Another one which took the biscuit for me (on Christmas Day in fact).

 

Dog bounds towards me barking... stops in my path starts growling... owner comes up (having ineffectually shouted at said dog who does not stop growling) "It's because you don't have a dog with you"..

 

I was speechless.

Link to comment

Am I the only one who is getting bored stiff of your dog stories?

I find these stories interesting...

This is a geocaching forum, and if we all start banging on about problems with things that are not caching related whilst "out caching" then this forum will go downhill fast.

And this is a story of a cacher's adventures which is being related on-line. Which is what geocaching is all about. I don't see the problem.

Link to comment

... I like even less dog owners who ... think that it's somehow my fault that their dog wants to attack me and 3) say "He's just being friendly" or "He's just playing".

Another one which took the biscuit for me (on Christmas Day in fact).

 

Dog bounds towards me barking... stops in my path starts growling... owner comes up (having ineffectually shouted at said dog who does not stop growling) "It's because you don't have a dog with you"..

 

I was speechless.

 

Well, so all I need to do, is go without a hat or stick, and have my own dog. I've got a stuffed dog, would that do?

 

Oh - just to be clear on this, 1) it isn't mine, it's ladysolly's, and 2) it isn't a dog that has been stuffed, it's a toy dog. But it's quite realistic.

Link to comment

Could it be the postman's uniform?

maybe it's because you smell of cats :rolleyes: I have a labrador [always on a lead or a lunge lead [10metre] and I have had dogs bounding up to me, I have always found this useful tbh. http://www.maplin.co.uk/ultrasonic-dog-chaser-33094?c=found&u=home%20&%20car&t=dog%20scarer&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=animal%20and%20pest&utm_term=dog%20scarer%20-e&gclid=cmu29ahctk0cfvqlfaod0aozma.I keep it in my pocket and when a "happy"dog approaches no problem but the yapping nipping one's get the button works wonders ,and the confused owner gets the I must have scared him routine .

Edited by dtr422
Link to comment

... I like even less dog owners who ... think that it's somehow my fault that their dog wants to attack me and 3) say "He's just being friendly" or "He's just playing".

Another one which took the biscuit for me (on Christmas Day in fact).

 

Dog bounds towards me barking... stops in my path starts growling... owner comes up (having ineffectually shouted at said dog who does not stop growling) "It's because you don't have a dog with you"..

 

I was speechless.

 

Well, so all I need to do, is go without a hat or stick, and have my own dog. I've got a stuffed dog, would that do?

 

Oh - just to be clear on this, 1) it isn't mine, it's ladysolly's, and 2) it isn't a dog that has been stuffed, it's a toy dog. But it's quite realistic.

 

Experience is,while caching,a big dog came running across from a distance,

and plonked its' front paws on my shoulders.I shouted at big dog as a fear response and dog the owner told me off.It was my fault the dog jumped up because I was frightened?

 

I start raising my voice at the dog owner and he did similar exchanges back .

Stopped shouting at dog owner and dog owner re-iterated it was my fault!

Shouting exchanges resumed only by then I was so incensed I had gone marching across to dog owner for a close exchange of words!

Eventually the dog owner got the message I wanted an apology.

But dog owner spoilt the apology with a parting retort(when he was a safe distance away from this little angry woman half his size and twice his age )that he hoped the next dog we met was a rotweiler.

(no offence meant to rotweilers,the tone was enough )

 

Husband with me at the time decided to keep as far away as possible from the proceedings.

He has his theories and he's sticking to them.

Link to comment

... I like even less dog owners who ... think that it's somehow my fault that their dog wants to attack me and 3) say "He's just being friendly" or "He's just playing".

Another one which took the biscuit for me (on Christmas Day in fact).

 

Dog bounds towards me barking... stops in my path starts growling... owner comes up (having ineffectually shouted at said dog who does not stop growling) "It's because you don't have a dog with you"..

 

I was speechless.

 

Well, so all I need to do, is go without a hat or stick, and have my own dog. I've got a stuffed dog, would that do?

 

Oh - just to be clear on this, 1) it isn't mine, it's ladysolly's, and 2) it isn't a dog that has been stuffed, it's a toy dog. But it's quite realistic.

 

Experience is,while caching,a big dog came running across from a distance,

and plonked its' front paws on my shoulders.I shouted at big dog as a fear response and dog the owner told me off.It was my fault the dog jumped up because I was frightened?

 

I start raising my voice at the dog owner and he did similar exchanges back .

Stopped shouting at dog owner and dog owner re-iterated it was my fault!

Shouting exchanges resumed only by then I was so incensed I had gone marching across to dog owner for a close exchange of words!

Eventually the dog owner got the message I wanted an apology.

But dog owner spoilt the apology with a parting retort(when he was a safe distance away from this little angry woman half his size and twice his age )that he hoped the next dog we met was a rotweiler.

(no offence meant to rotweilers,the tone was enough )

 

Husband with me at the time decided to keep as far away as possible from the proceedings.

He has his theories and he's sticking to them.

 

Maybe we should look at this from the dog owner's point of view.

 

He has this furry friend, who is well behaved at home, hardly ever chews up socks and always goes outside when need be. And he and his furry friend are going for a walk. Furry friend wants to run and sniff things, so he lets him off the lead, and everything is tickety-boo.

 

Then along comes this strange character, wearing a hat and walking with a stick, and his dog bounds up to him and woofs joyfully to him, and jumps happily up to him to play.

 

And this strange character gets all upset, and claims that the dog is out of control, and should be on a lead. What a horrible person this strange character is, and wouldn't it be a good idea to tell him so. So he explains to the strange character that the dog is just being friendly, and what's your problem?

 

And then the strange character, for no reason at all, gets upset. And when the dog continues to woof happily at him, and bounce up in a friendly fashion, the strange character claims that he's being attacked! As if!! Furry friend has *never* attacked anyone. Can't he see that the dog is just being friendly?

 

And then the strange character pushes the dog away, a vicious and unprovoked attack, doesn't he know that you shouldn't push a dog?

 

And so on.

 

Maybe one of the dog experts amongst us could give us the dog's point of view in all this?

Link to comment

<sigh> Just another dog bashing thread ...

 

Maybe I should start one about the nutter who grabbed both our dogs, one by the collar and one by the scruff of the neck on NYD. Their crime? According to him, his kids were scared so he grabbed the dogs, as they went past him on a path (not in any way interfering with him or his kids)wrongly believing that might help. Absolute nutter.

Link to comment

<sigh> Just another dog bashing thread ...

 

Maybe I should start one about the nutter who grabbed both our dogs, one by the collar and one by the scruff of the neck on NYD. Their crime? According to him, his kids were scared so he grabbed the dogs, as they went past him on a path (not in any way interfering with him or his kids)wrongly believing that might help. Absolute nutter.

 

That's awful. I hope you explained to him that his kids shouldn't have been scared of your dogs, and that even if they were, he should have taken no action.

Link to comment

<sigh> Just another dog bashing thread ...

 

Maybe I should start one about the nutter who grabbed both our dogs, one by the collar and one by the scruff of the neck on NYD. Their crime? According to him, his kids were scared so he grabbed the dogs, as they went past him on a path (not in any way interfering with him or his kids)wrongly believing that might help. Absolute nutter.

 

OK, nothing entitles him to do that, although it does throw up a few questions:

Could you see that his kids were scared?

If so, did you call your dogs back to you (and would they come if you did - close control according to the law)?

 

Obviously if you couldn't see that the kids were scared then there is nothing you could do. I've had it many times with my little sister, she is visably scared of dogs but some owners just don't notice (mostly as they are a good 200-300 yards behind their dog and can't see her reaction to their dog) and although I'm scared of dogs I just stand still yet owners don't seem to notice this as a reaction to their dog.

 

At the end of the day, what can we do? Nothing, those of us that dogs find tasty/amusing to bark at/fun to play with are just going to have to carry on in life as we have up until now and dog owners, quite rightly, will defend their 'best friends' as best they can. All I ask is that dog owners that read this go away thinking about how others may react to their dog(s).

Link to comment

 

Maybe YOU should have your dogs more under control. Don't care what frightens my kids, they're far more important than anyones out of control dog (s) :mad:

 

 

as they went past him on a path (not in any way interfering with him or his kids)

That doesn't sound like 'OUT OF CONTROL' dog(s) to me?

Link to comment

(and would they come if you did - close control according to the law)?

 

 

Have a look at the posters profile, I think that will answer this question for you!

 

So I am to take from this that the person who grabbed her dogs by the collar and neck is the kind of person that would grab a working dog regardless? Surely if that's the case then that person should not even be allowed to be near children (regardless of how scared of dogs they are) as he is clearly unstable?

 

Other than that I'm confused as to what you are trying to say.

Link to comment

(and would they come if you did - close control according to the law)?

 

 

Have a look at the posters profile, I think that will answer this question for you!

 

...

Other than that I'm confused as to what you are trying to say.

 

You asked whether they would come if they were called, if it's a trained assistance dog then the answer to your question is "Yes".

Link to comment

<sigh> Just another dog bashing thread ...

 

Maybe I should start one about the nutter who grabbed both our dogs, one by the collar and one by the scruff of the neck on NYD. Their crime? According to him, his kids were scared so he grabbed the dogs, as they went past him on a path (not in any way interfering with him or his kids)wrongly believing that might help. Absolute nutter.

 

OK, nothing entitles him to do that, although it does throw up a few questions:

Could you see that his kids were scared?

If so, did you call your dogs back to you (and would they come if you did - close control according to the law)?

 

As another poster said, look at Dorsetgal's profile.

 

I'm not a dog lover by any means, and I haven't met her current dog but did meet her previous dog. Even as someone who generally doesn't like dogs I find it hard to imagine how anyone could take exception to Caesar.

 

Of course the trouble is that it's the few who give the many a bad name. Just as cyclists are tarnished by the idiots who blow through red lights and use pavements as their personal racetracks and geocachers are tarnished by the idiots who would destroy a dry stone wall bordering a cemetary just to find the film pot, so dog owners are tarnished by the idiots who let their oversize dog run wild.

 

As I said I'm not a dog lover but would still acknowledge (as I believe drsolly did in a previous post) that the majority of encounters with dogs are not troublesome in the slightest.

Link to comment

Although I haven't met the current Geodog, Wendy's previous assistance dog Caesar was the gentlest and best behaved dog I have ever had the pleasure to meet. I have no doubt at all her current companion is similarly behaved.

 

Would you feel the same if it had been a blind person with a guide dog? I only looked in on this forum today after my first geocaching trip for many months and I was saddened to find the same old whingeing and moaning that drove me away before.

 

Wendy, ignore the moaners, you know how wonderful your dog is, don't let them spoil it for you.

Link to comment
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Followers 4
×
×
  • Create New...