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When People Don't Log Their Finds


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;) maybe it's just me but does anyone else get upset when people don't log their finds. They other day i was on my way home from work and i drove past the place where i placed my very first cache. As i approached the location i noticed a vehicle there i knew it had to be a cacher so i stopped to chat. As they were walking to their vehicle i asked they they found it ok. They kinda smiled said yes and asked if i was the owner told then yes and they said it was easier than they thought and they hid it a little better. I left then they left. they did tell me they had found my other one that was down the road a couple miles. i have been watching the site and checking my mail and they never logged that they found it. i know that people are in they sport/hobby just for the find but you have to go online to see the cache is there why would you not log you found the cache???? :huh:
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I have wondered the same thing. Last December, I found this cache, which sits on the Appalachian Trail in Pennsylvania, and requires a fairly difficult hike to reach. Part of my interest in finding it was also the fact that no finds had been logged for 10 months, but when I read the physical log, I saw three logs that weren't logged online. I posted pics of the missing logs. How anybody could forget to log such an accomplishment is beyond me, and not one person, but 3 in a row!

 

:huh:

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How is it rude that they don't electronically log the find? The purpose of the log book is to communicate with the cache owner, as well as the futire finders in the field.

Some folks might be completely computer illeterate, and have family, friends etc find listings for them, they might have limited access to the listing site (library, friends computer, etc), some might just feel like it's redundant to write something in a book, then recap that on the site.

 

There are tons of reasons to not log online, but short of robbing a cache, I wouldn't call it rude.

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I love computers. So for me it is no big deal to log finds etc... But, the person who recruited me into geocaching (which I am fairly new to) and took the time to take me out caching, show me how to use my GPS, and showed a HUGE amount of respect and enthusiasm for this sport doesn't log his finds. Well, he signs the logbooks, but he doesnt log them here on geocaching.com.

 

I guess I can see both sides, but if they are making good trades, moving travel bugs, being respectful of the surroundings, and spreading the love of the game...I see no harm in not electronically logging the finds.

 

What you could do if you have the time, is scan all of the written log book pages and make them available as images of your cache. That would seem to balance both of your needs / wishes.

 

Good Luck!

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Does it sound strange for me to say that I often just don't get around to it? :blink: That to me it is a tedious chore, and since I'm really not out to "get numbers" anyway, I'll usually actually log a cache when I have something that I specifically want to say to the cache owner and/or to the subsequent seekers.

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Some people log the book and online.

Some just the book. Both kinds are giving back in their own way. If the log book is stolen though the formers logs are lost entirely.

 

Lastly there are some that don't log at all. They are ghosts and parasites on the game. If everyone were a ghost nobody would place caches. That a good portion of the people do log, make it possible for them to exist and keeps the game going.

 

Locally 40-50% log the book but not online. I can't even guess the ghost percentage.

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How is it rude that they don't electronically log the find? The purpose of the log book is to communicate with the cache owner, as well as the futire finders in the field.

 

Cache owners often don't get out to visit their caches for months at a time - sometimes longer for remote caches. The online logs help them judge the traffic at the cache and provide important information about the cache's condition and maintenance requirements.

 

The paper logbooks have also been known to disappear, or be destroyed by water and natural events like forest fires, so its entirely possible that the owner will never get to see the logbook.

 

There are tons of reasons to not log online

 

Tons? Realistically speaking there are very few good reasons. The majority of people who geocache are technology literate. The sport draws these people by its very nature. Most of the rest are at least able to access a website and log a find. Honestly, how many people can figure out how to operate a GPS, but not how to log a cache? Yeah, I guess there are a handful.

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We had the same situation with a cache we found in a state park last fall. The website showed it hadn't been found in about 10 months, but there were a couple other logs. I didn't get it either - having hid a couple of caches of our own now, we enjoy the emails as much as anything.

 

I agree with others that if someone took the time/expense to hide a cache for you to be able to find, it's a nice gesture to log your experience online. If you don't feel confident in writing some huge epistle, that's cool. Just a quick little something to know you enjoyed the hunt or there were problems, etc.

 

Oh, and someone above mentioned that as long as they are "... moving travel bugs..." How can they do that without logging online? Not being smart, I just can't figure out how they can move them and the bugs show up in the correct cache for others to find.

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It's possible I've discovered a new creature ( and I'm just guessing at this point, but maybe): a cacher who caches and logs under one name, but also has a second name with no "finds" but who owns caches....or else I've found a cacher who does not log on the computer but owns caches - in which case I would think he would discover the pleasure of reading the logs online and decide to give that pleasure back and start logging.

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There are two *really* good reasons to log your finds and your DNFs:

 

1) It lets the cache owner know the cache is okay (or not).

2) It lets people who are looking for a cache to hunt know that the cache has been found recently (or NOT).

 

People who don't log their finds/DNFs are USING the information from other people (Finds/DNFS) to decide which caches to hunt, but they are not PROVIDING the same information to others.

 

To me this behavior is rude.

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Another possibilty is out of town or out of state cachers. Sometimes they don't log there caches until they get home. I have had power cachers find 50 caches in my area, including 20 of mine, that took several days to log their finds. When they did log their finds, I got 100 emails in two days.

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:D

Hey Folks, logging is part of the game. If you are going to play, play by the rules. If an owner has placed a cache up a 5 mile mountain trail and it is found but not logged do we expect him/her to check the cache everyday to see if the cache log is signed? What about someone who is after a first find. It is kinda discouraging to take the hike assuming there are no finds just to see a signed log. One question to ask: what if everyone chose to not record the find on the ol computer? Where would that leave us? :rolleyes:

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There are poeple who don't log. I think its rude. If someone takes the time, effort and expense to place a cache, the least someone can do is tell the owner they found the cache and enjoyed the hunt.

No. "The least someone should do" is follow the published rules of the game.

 

The FAQ linked on the geocaching.com homepage lists the following "rules" for cache finders:

 

1. Take something from the cache

 

2. Leave something in the cache

 

3. Write about it in the logbook

 

Online logs are not mentioned on that list, much less anything that would suggest that cache finders are obligated to write (in the logbook or online) logs that heap(perhaps unwarranted) praise upon the cache or stroke the ego of the (perhaps undeserving) cache owner.

 

Fortunately, cache owners interested only in hearing how wonderful their cache was, even when it wasn't, appear to be few in number.

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Cache owners often don't get out to visit their caches for months at a time - sometimes longer for remote caches. The online logs help them judge the traffic at the cache and provide important information about the cache's condition and maintenance requirements.

Whose problem is that? The cache owner's. It is the cache owner's responsibility to determine the status/condition of the cache and to maintain the cache on a regular basis.

 

Unfortunately, instead of making periodic maintenance visits to their caches, far too many cache owners never revisit their caches; they rely instead on the good will of other cachers to correct any/all problems reported in the online logs. Such "owners" should not be permitted to list caches on geocaching.com, and any active caches they have should be, through official action, archived and removed.

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Hey Folks, logging is part of the game. If you are going to play, play by the rules.

(cough cough)

 

The "rules":

 

1. Take something from the cache

 

2. Leave something in the cache

 

3. Write about it in the logbook

 

Now, I log every find and DNF. In fact, I even note follow-on visits for each cache I'm at (a warm fuzzy to the owner, for example, on a cache that's been quiet a while, and someone who's found it reports all is ok). I personally believe that's the courteous thing to do.

 

However, I do not begrudge folks who haven't completed online logs. I've got friends and family that do not, and they range from not having a computer to not feeling comfortable about the web-based log. So be it, I'm certainly not going to discourage them from continuing the sport.

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From the owner's point of view (at least me as an owner), I enjoy reading the online log entries, especially when the cacher has made an attempt to tell me how much he/she enjoyed finding the cache. This is part of the fun of setting out the cache.

 

As a "finder", I always log. My entry at the cache may be very brief, especially if it is a cache in an observable area, but I try to make up for the terse entry with a good online post that will tell the owner how much I enjoyed the cache--at least for the ones where it is obvious that the person placing the cache made a real effort to make it an enjoyable experience.

 

I suppose if someone chooses not to log, that is their business, but I wonder how many people would still place caches if no one provided feedback and encouragement?

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Some people don't log it as a silent protest.  Others don't log because they're completely unconcerned with numbers.

 

Your mystery cacher could be either of the two above, or they could just be behind in their logging of caches...

Ok, what are they protesting?

I think my wife is protesting the fact that I encourage her to log her finds.

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Another possibilty is out of town or out of state cachers. Sometimes they don't log there caches until they get home. I have had power cachers find 50 caches in my area, including 20 of mine, that took several days to log their finds. When they did log their finds, I got 100 emails in two days.

Very true. We just returned from a week long trip where we visited 4 states. We had 60 finds in Nebraska alone, more than the number of finds we have in our home state of Colorado! But since I'm a geek, I had my wireless laptop with me on the trip and logged most of those finds from in from of someone's house or business. Saved me the trouble of logging when I got home :rolleyes:

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let's not get hasty about calling people rude.

 

i'm currently almost 50 caches behind in my logging because if i'm not disposed to sitting down and making a good log, i wait until i am. it's a project, because i like to write a log worth reading.

 

if i have found any of your caches and you want me to be more prompt, just let me know and i'll be happy to slap "fctslssltftc" on your page.

 

there are some caches i have found but won't log, and yes, some of them are sort of as a protest, i guess. it's not a public declaration; it's just that i'm not logging those particular caches. this assists me in my other PUBLIC protest of keeping inaccurate accounts just to skew records.

 

my mother, on the other hand, is a casual cacher. she's been caching a few months longer than i have and has found -maybe- thirty caches, and that's a liberal number.

 

almost without exception she does not log online. she is not computer illiterate, but she's the kind of person who has not figured out how to use the "goto" on her very nice GPS but rather walks around with it until the numbers match up.

 

she leaves a nice written log and usually leaves a trade that increases the total value of the cache contents by about 500%. i have seen her take a marble and leave a sterling silver knicknack.

 

i would hestitate to call this rude.

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let's not get hasty about calling people rude.

 

i'm currently almost 50 caches behind in my logging because if i'm not disposed to sitting down and making a good log, i wait until i am. it's a project, because i like to write a log worth reading.

I'm in the same boat as you. At any given time I am 25 to 50 caches behind on my online logs. Eventually I get around to logging them, and not always in the order I found them. Sometimes it takes up to 6 months for me to log a cache online. If I had to log them ASAP after finding them, they'd probably get a very short, terse log entry.

 

The numbers don't mean much to me nor am I very concerned whether other cachers think my logging habits are rude or inconsiderate. Those who have strong feelings about people not logging their finds online need to spend less time dictating to others that they should play the game their way. IMHO, it's arrogant, rude and really none of their business.

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...nor am I very concerned whether other cachers think my logging habits are rude or inconsiderate.  Those who have strong feelings about people not logging their finds online need to spend less time dictating to others that they should play the game their way.  IMHO, it's arrogant, rude and really none of their business.

 

Surely we can strive for a balance between a cache owner's desire for prompt and detailed online logs and people who hold Gorak's position. I hold myself accountable to the cache owner of the cache I just hunted, as well as fellow cachers behind me, and I owe it to them to keep the information flowing. If the cache is a great experience, or is trashed or missing, they deserve to know about it as early as possible, and I would hope cachers who find my caches return the same courtesy, but I don't get bent out of shape either way. It's all about balance, consideration and attitude.

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I'm in the same boat as you. At any given time I am 25 to 50 caches behind on my online logs.

 

I don't think the OP, or anybody else has a problem with people who are behind in their logging. Its people who enjoy the hard work of others and can't be bothered to say thanks, or at least provide feedback, that some find annoying.

 

Personally, I don't place a cache to be thanked. I doubt anybody does. But I - and many other cache owners - enjoy reading the cache logs. I look forward to them and I like to know if the finders enjoyed theirselves. Without the feedback that comes from an online logs, I doubt that I'd be so enthusiastic about placing caches.

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How is it rude that they don't electronically log the find? The purpose of the log book is to communicate with the cache owner, as well as the futire finders in the field.

 

Cache owners often don't get out to visit their caches for months at a time - sometimes longer for remote caches. The online logs help them judge the traffic at the cache and provide important information about the cache's condition and maintenance requirements.

 

The paper logbooks have also been known to disappear, or be destroyed by water and natural events like forest fires, so its entirely possible that the owner will never get to see the logbook.

 

There are tons of reasons to not log online

 

Tons? Realistically speaking there are very few good reasons. The majority of people who geocache are technology literate. The sport draws these people by its very nature. Most of the rest are at least able to access a website and log a find. Honestly, how many people can figure out how to operate a GPS, but not how to log a cache? Yeah, I guess there are a handful.

Once again we are back to the game, and how it's perceived by the individual. It's not required that you log in both places, heck, it's not required you log at all. Sure the rules may say it, but I can go find as many caches as I want and never log at all.

 

Sure, everyone is somewhat technology literate, and can log, but how many people want to. it doesn't spoil your playing if you don't let it. So yeah, there are tons of reasons, just as there are tons for logging.

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As a cache owner I like getting feedback about how well folks like a cache. If it's an acronym log, I couldn't care less if they log or not. Quite frankly, I don't care if they log online or not either way.

 

OTOH, we won't log some caches. We'll put just about as much effort into logging as the owner put into placing--none.

 

Next, I have to wonder. If you are "supposed" to log your visits and you stop looking because you don't like the cache, how are you supposed to log? DNF because you didn't find it, but what do you say? "Sorry, I stopped looking for your cache because the location sucked." Of course, the log would most likely get deleted. But you're supposed to log, right?

 

Eh, we'll log online if we consider the owner put forth enough effort to warrant it.

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Wow, I'm agreeing with Flask, Gorak, and CR all in one post. Someone should buy lottery tickets tonight!

 

I'm WAAAAAY behind in my logs (still working on 2004 logs). I like to write quality logs for quality caches, and I have to be in a creative mood. I also type really slow. My prettier half logs her finds online pretty quick, and makes a point to mention I was there too, so it's not like the cache owner isn't getting any feedback. I tried writing short, cut-n-paste logs once, and several cache owners who were used to reading my normally verbose logs thought that meant I didn't enjoy their cache.

If I've found your cache, you know I was there from Geo Ho's log.

If I DNFed it or there was a problem with the cache; I will log it ASAP and/or email the owner.

If I think your cache sucked, I may never bother to log it as a find.

Edited by Mopar
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I usually log online, and I do it because I want to. Finds, DNFs, notes, if I have something to say about an experience with a cache, I log it. Normally I log within a day or so. But for various personal reasons, I haven't logged every one. Nor do I feel obligated to.

 

I appreciate it when somebody logs a find on one of my caches. I appreciate it more when they tell a story. But if somebody doesn't want to leave a log, thats OK too.

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Oh, and someone above mentioned that as long as they are "... moving travel bugs..." How can they do that without logging online?

 

You don't have to log a find to move a travel bug FYI. You just use the "note" feature. The travel bug gets moved, logs the miles but you don't log a find on the cache. Not saying alot of people do it, but it CAN be done.

Edited by mantis7
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Another possibilty is out of town or out of state cachers. Sometimes they don't log there caches until they get home. I have had power cachers find 50 caches in my area, including 20 of mine, that took several days to log their finds. When they did log their finds, I got 100 emails in two days.

This is true. I was out checking on my caches one day and ran into some out of staters. Had a wonderful time chating with them and was looking forward to what they would put online. Well nothing for over a month. Then one day out of the blue there it was. They got busy when they got home and forgot to log their find. I now this isn't the reason for all but some.

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You don't have to log a find to move a travel bug FYI. You just use the "note" feature. The travel bug gets moved, logs the miles but you don't log a find on the cache. Not saying alot of people do it, but it CAN be done.

Actually, this happens quite frequently. Lots of people move TBs in and out of caches which they have previously logged as a find by logging a note rather than another find.

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Oh, sorry, I misunderstood on the moving travel bugs without a log. I would consider a note a log just like a find or a DNF, because it shows up as an entry in the online log. I thought when you were referring to "not leaving a log" that there wasn't any kind of entry, not just a find/no find. Seems like splitting hairs to me - with the exception of leaving a note because you've already logged a find, if you're going to go to the trouble of leaving a note to move the bug, why wouldn't you go ahead and log the find? I mean, really, the :rolleyes: is so much cuter than the notepad. he he he :laughing:

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I don't care if people are tardy in their logging, my point is that the system doesn't work if you don't log at all. I stick by my "rude" comment.

The "system" of logging online was not even part of the original game of geocaching. It came later on. You wrote in the logbook and optionally emailed the cache owner. I fail to see how people playing the game the way it was originally conceived and intended could ever be thought of as rude.

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I don't care if people are tardy in their logging, my point is that the system doesn't work if you don't log at all. I stick by my "rude" comment.

The "system" of logging online was not even part of the original game of geocaching. It came later on. You wrote in the logbook and optionally emailed the cache owner. I fail to see how people playing the game the way it was originally conceived and intended could ever be thought of as rude.

Then I assume you don't look at past logs to determine whether or not to go seek a cache...

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I don't care if people are tardy in their logging, my point is that the system doesn't work if you don't log at all. I stick by my "rude" comment.

The "system" of logging online was not even part of the original game of geocaching. It came later on. You wrote in the logbook and optionally emailed the cache owner. I fail to see how people playing the game the way it was originally conceived and intended could ever be thought of as rude.

Then I assume you don't look at past logs to determine whether or not to go seek a cache...

One liners are weak and pathetic arguments! :laughing:

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When I started caching I didn't log my finds due to lack of regular access to a computer.(library)I was also keen on the anonymity one has in the sport.It wasn't until I placed a cache that I realised the importance of online logging.

Thank you. Some poeple will never "get it" and I really don't care if they never find a cache of mine at all. Heck if I could make it ghost proof I would. They can find ghost caches. I don't care if you log only online, only in the book or both, but I would like to see a log just so I know the cache is being found even if they have nothing good to say.

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When I started caching I didn't log my finds due to lack of regular access to a computer.(library)I was also keen on the anonymity one has in the sport.It wasn't until I placed a cache that I realised the importance of online logging.

Thank you. Some poeple will never "get it" and I really don't care if they never find a cache of mine at all. Heck if I could make it ghost proof I would. They can find ghost caches. I don't care if you log only online, only in the book or both, but I would like to see a log just so I know the cache is being found even if they have nothing good to say.

Ghosters are cachers too!

ghostpatrol.JPG

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I don't care if people are tardy in their logging, my point is that the system doesn't work if you don't log at all. I stick by my "rude" comment.

The "system" of logging online was not even part of the original game of geocaching. It came later on. You wrote in the logbook and optionally emailed the cache owner. I fail to see how people playing the game the way it was originally conceived and intended could ever be thought of as rude.

Then I assume you don't look at past logs to determine whether or not to go seek a cache...

One liners are weak and pathetic arguments! :laughing:

I didn't think I needed more than a line to make my point.

 

My point is that I think many cachers rely heavily on the logs to determine whether or not a cache it is a good candidate to hunt. Those people who are saying there is no need to log your finds/dnfs online are basically saying:

 

1) I will use *your* information to help me decide which caches to seek.

2) I will NOT help you out by providing the same information.

 

Does that seem fair? Not to me. Am I trying to force anyone to log, no. If you don't log fine, but I don't have to agree with your attitude. Do I care that there are people who are uncomfortable with computers and they don't log. No, not at all.

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Am I trying to force anyone to log, no.  If you don't log fine, but I don't have to agree with your attitude.  Do I care that there are people who are uncomfortable with computers and they don't log. No, not at all.

Than you're just whining. :laughing:

So you haven't expressed your opinion on this matter at all that I can see. Do you have one or are you just trying to upset me by critisizing everything I say?

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I wonder if the people who don't log their finds are the same people who leave the caches nearly uncovered, or poorly disguised, since they won't be known as the person who last visited the cache. :laughing:

 

Personally, I can't imagine not logging a find. In fact, I felt bad about not being able to log a few finds for several days when I was on a recent camping trip.

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