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What is the point of Geocaching?


dirt_empire
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So back when I started geocaching (October/November of 2010) I remember reading somewhere that the point of geocaching was to bring people to interesting places they would normally not visit/see.

 

A little over a year on I question whether everyone believes in that; I see many caches that were just dropped somewhere of no importance, often just to have been placed there. My intent when placing caches is to specifically place them somewhere interesting you may not normally find, or to provide some odd form of entertainment. I also view it as a way to showcase your creatvity in hides and containers, thereby justifying hiding spots that are of no particular importance.

 

This being the case I'm trying to figure out why YOU geocache. Specifically why you place things where you do, but also to see why you got into the activity.

 

And... go!

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So back when I started geocaching (October/November of 2010) I remember reading somewhere that the point of geocaching was to bring people to interesting places they would normally not visit/see.

A little over a year on I question whether everyone believes in that; I see many caches that were just dropped somewhere of no importance, often just to have been placed there. My intent when placing caches is to specifically place them somewhere interesting you may not normally find, or to provide some odd form of entertainment. I also view it as a way to showcase your creatvity in hides and containers, thereby justifying hiding spots that are of no particular importance.

 

This being the case I'm trying to figure out why YOU geocache. Specifically why you place things where you do, but also to see why you got into the activity.

 

And... go!

That's why I started and why is still do it.

 

and now to meet others nuts .... uh ..... I mean cachers like me.

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Take it at face value that you are not everybody. Different people have different reasons. There is no reason to 'figure out' other cachers. They do what they do and as long as they don't bother you:

Live and let live. If something doesn't affect you don't let it bother you.

Seriously, someone should quote that. It'd make the world a better place. Take credit, I don't care.

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Well, lead by example. You have only 2 hides and am afraid none have any favorite points at this moment in time. Course, having a cache with no favorite points does not mean its bad, it just did not stand out to folks.

 

I cannot speak for your area, but in many urban areas that I have been to there are rarely totally virgin undiscovered areas to bring folks to that have not been done before. Thus, in most cases, you are either bringing folks back to places that had caches before you, or squeezing into spots that folks did not realize. Have been to so many parks and great places I have never even thought of since I geocached. Course, I have been to some horrible spots too.

 

The nice containers are the ones I remember too. I admit I am not the greatest hider, but have at least tried to make a story in all my caches and have put some effort into some creations. Vast majority of my caches were areas I enjoy and I write descriptions that give some sort of story.

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So back when I started geocaching (October/November of 2010) I remember reading somewhere that the point of geocaching was to bring people to interesting places they would normally not visit/see.

A little over a year on I question whether everyone believes in that; I see many caches that were just dropped somewhere of no importance, often just to have been placed there. My intent when placing caches is to specifically place them somewhere interesting you may not normally find, or to provide some odd form of entertainment. I also view it as a way to showcase your creatvity in hides and containers, thereby justifying hiding spots that are of no particular importance.

 

This being the case I'm trying to figure out why YOU geocache. Specifically why you place things where you do, but also to see why you got into the activity.

 

And... go!

That's why I started and why is still do it.

 

and now to meet others nuts .... uh ..... I mean cachers like me.

 

I guess it just bugs me to see hundred of uninteresting geocaches all placed in parking lots and under fire hydrants. Fun though the challenge to find them with muggles around may be, it all rings a little hollow.

 

Another open question.

 

As well, does every interesting cache need to have swag? I have a lovely cache that will hold no swag but is extremely crafty and entertaining. Just because it doesn't have the ability to contain swag does that make it any less valid?

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Well, lead by example. You have only 2 hides and am afraid none have any favorite points at this moment in time. Course, having a cache with no favorite points does not mean its bad, it just did not stand out to folks.

 

I cannot speak for your area, but in many urban areas that I have been to there are rarely totally virgin undiscovered areas to bring folks to that have not been done before. Thus, in most cases, you are either bringing folks back to places that had caches before you, or squeezing into spots that folks did not realize. Have been to so many parks and great places I have never even thought of since I geocached. Course, I have been to some horrible spots too.

 

The nice containers are the ones I remember too. I admit I am not the greatest hider, but have at least tried to make a story in all my caches and have put some effort into some creations. Vast majority of my caches were areas I enjoy and I write descriptions that give some sort of story.

 

Thank you. Something about your post has given me hope on some level.

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I guess it just bugs me to see hundred of uninteresting geocaches all placed in parking lots and under fire hydrants. Fun though the challenge to find them with muggles around may be, it all rings a little hollow.

 

Another open question.

 

As well, does every interesting cache need to have swag? I have a lovely cache that will hold no swag but is extremely crafty and entertaining. Just because it doesn't have the ability to contain swag does that make it any less valid?

No it doesn't.

 

I have a cache that takes cacher to a courthouse on National Register of Historic Places. Beacuse the location won't allow anything else it's a micro. I try not to hide micros if I can, but in this case it's what will bring the cacher to a interesting spot.

Here it is.

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I haven't hid anything yet. I have been thinking of "if I hid a cache, where would I hide it" and haven't come up with anywhere yet. I'd want it to be a nice place that you could explore at least a little bit or even just a nice place to have lunch or enjoy a sunset :) I'd also want my hide to be a good one. Not like, a tricky little fake bird but just a clever hiding spot that is clever but not absurdly difficult.

 

As for why I got into this... well, I know the how but I don't recall why I thought this was cool :anicute: I guess I just like having another use for my GPS unit and having a good excuse to go outside and at least walk around. I think it's pretty fun finding things too :)

 

I like swag, but it won't make or break anything. Actually, I think I'd rather have a good cache (clever container or cleverly hidden, nice spot) with no swag than a cache with crappy swag. I found somebody's signature item the other day and I thought that was so neat! Just a wooden nickel, but I was so taken with it. I'd kind of rather find something like that :) (although I had a dream night before last that I found a cache and a brand new GPS unit was inside and I wanted it so bad but I had nothing to trade up or even :laughing: and then it turned out to be like, a really simple little kid GPS unit and for some reason I couldn't get it back in the cache :laughing: )

 

I think what I like best is when I get my dad to go with me :) It's totally something I can do on my own, but I like it when Dad is there. Maybe someday I can cow my mom into coming along too :laughing:

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This is my point of geocaching:

 

70afcb0b-326b-4738-8983-00696f1857d7.jpg

 

That's me holding the sign and the rest of my family around me. In the big picture I don't care where it is, what it looks like, or what you put in it. I don't even care if we FIND it. Our adventures and memories are what makes it all worthwhile.

 

 

* even parking lot caches... imagine six people trying to be stealthy as they crowd around a lamp post. We look like Canada's Worst Ninjas. :blink:

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I guess it just bugs me to see hundred of uninteresting geocaches all placed in parking lots and under fire hydrants. Fun though the challenge to find them with muggles around may be, it all rings a little hollow.

 

Another open question.

 

As well, does every interesting cache need to have swag? I have a lovely cache that will hold no swag but is extremely crafty and entertaining. Just because it doesn't have the ability to contain swag does that make it any less valid?

No it doesn't.

 

I have a cache that takes cacher to a courthouse on National Register of Historic Places. Beacuse the location won't allow anything else it's a micro. I try not to hide micros if I can, but in this case it's what will bring the cacher to a interesting spot.

Here it is.

I love history caches and interesting places. I have quite a few histoty listings and waymarks.

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So back when I started geocaching (October/November of 2010) I remember reading somewhere that the point of geocaching was to bring people to interesting places they would normally not visit/see.

A little over a year on I question whether everyone believes in that; I see many caches that were just dropped somewhere of no importance, often just to have been placed there. My intent when placing caches is to specifically place them somewhere interesting you may not normally find, or to provide some odd form of entertainment. I also view it as a way to showcase your creatvity in hides and containers, thereby justifying hiding spots that are of no particular importance.

 

This being the case I'm trying to figure out why YOU geocache. Specifically why you place things where you do, but also to see why you got into the activity.

 

And... go!

That's why I started and why is still do it.

 

and now to meet others nuts .... uh ..... I mean cachers like me.

 

I guess it just bugs me to see hundred of uninteresting geocaches all placed in parking lots and under fire hydrants. Fun though the challenge to find them with muggles around may be, it all rings a little hollow.

 

Another open question.

 

As well, does every interesting cache need to have swag? I have a lovely cache that will hold no swag but is extremely crafty and entertaining. Just because it doesn't have the ability to contain swag does that make it any less valid?

And it bugs me when others complain about caches they don't like. If you don't like them, then just don't go look for them.

I ALWAYS appreciate people who take the time to place caches for us to find. We have seen so many great things, met some wonderful people, laughed at some crazy caches. We've also seen some not-so-great places, met some not-as-wonderful people, and well...you get the point.

If there are caches you don't care for, then don't go search for them. But don't rag on the people who hid them - they took their time to do that just for the enjoyment of others. Go find some that you enjoy finding. Or hide some for others. That's the beauty of this hobby...there is something for everyone.

Just sayin'.

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This is my point of geocaching:

 

70afcb0b-326b-4738-8983-00696f1857d7.jpg

 

That's me holding the sign and the rest of my family around me. In the big picture I don't care where it is, what it looks like, or what you put in it. I don't even care if we FIND it. Our adventures and memories are what makes it all worthwhile.

 

 

* even parking lot caches... imagine six people trying to be stealthy as they crowd around a lamp post. We look like Canada's Worst Ninjas. :blink:

+1

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This is my point of geocaching:

 

70afcb0b-326b-4738-8983-00696f1857d7.jpg

 

That's me holding the sign and the rest of my family around me. In the big picture I don't care where it is, what it looks like, or what you put in it. I don't even care if we FIND it. Our adventures and memories are what makes it all worthwhile.

 

 

* even parking lot caches... imagine six people trying to be stealthy as they crowd around a lamp post. We look like Canada's Worst Ninjas. :blink:

+1

+2 We're new to this. Don't much care what it is, where it is, what it contains, the fun for us is an activity that gets us outside, together as a family, getting some exercise and spending time together, whether that be celebrating the thrill of the find or the disappointment of the DNF. We share it together.

 

Lovely photo 6NoisyHikers! Thanks for sharing

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This being the case I'm trying to figure out why YOU geocache.
For me, sometimes, it's an excuse for a trip, whether that trip is a short detour on my commute, a long hike through the woods, a drive somewhere off the beaten path, or a chance to try something new (e.g., kayaking).

 

Sometimes, it's about interesting places, whether those places are historic, scenic, or artistic. (I especially enjoy caches that draw attention to public art.)

 

Sometimes, it's about the challenge, whether the challenge is solving a puzzle, finding a well-camouflaged cache, or retrieving a cleverly placed container. (I especially enjoy on-site puzzles and caches with 4-star camouflage.)

 

And sometimes it's about companionship, although I don't make it to events, unevents, and group hikes very often...

 

As well, does every interesting cache need to have swag?
Not at all. I haven't given any Favorites points because of the trade items in the cache. Many of my Favorites haven't had any room for trade items.

 

Besides, the only things I trade for are personal signature items left by other geocachers.

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So back when I started geocaching (October/November of 2010) I remember reading somewhere that the point of geocaching was to bring people to interesting places they would normally not visit/see.

A little over a year on I question whether everyone believes in that; I see many caches that were just dropped somewhere of no importance, often just to have been placed there. My intent when placing caches is to specifically place them somewhere interesting you may not normally find, or to provide some odd form of entertainment. I also view it as a way to showcase your creatvity in hides and containers, thereby justifying hiding spots that are of no particular importance.

 

This being the case I'm trying to figure out why YOU geocache. Specifically why you place things where you do, but also to see why you got into the activity.

 

And... go!

That's why I started and why is still do it.

 

and now to meet others nuts .... uh ..... I mean cachers like me.

 

I guess it just bugs me to see hundred of uninteresting geocaches all placed in parking lots and under fire hydrants. Fun though the challenge to find them with muggles around may be, it all rings a little hollow.

 

Another open question.

 

As well, does every interesting cache need to have swag? I have a lovely cache that will hold no swag but is extremely crafty and entertaining. Just because it doesn't have the ability to contain swag does that make it any less valid?

fire hydrant hides should be banned. they're usually very small and could jam the impellars in a firetruck. imagine how you'd feel to be told a micro geocache jammed in the truck and thats why your house burned to the ground. :surprise:

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So back when I started geocaching (October/November of 2010) I remember reading somewhere that the point of geocaching was to bring people to interesting places they would normally not visit/see.

 

A little over a year on I question whether everyone believes in that; I see many caches that were just dropped somewhere of no importance, often just to have been placed there. My intent when placing caches is to specifically place them somewhere interesting you may not normally find, or to provide some odd form of entertainment. I also view it as a way to showcase your creatvity in hides and containers, thereby justifying hiding spots that are of no particular importance.

 

This being the case I'm trying to figure out why YOU geocache. Specifically why you place things where you do, but also to see why you got into the activity.

 

And... go!

to see all the pretty cars on the parking lot. gives me something to look at while i'm raising the lamp post base. :anitongue:

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So back when I started geocaching (October/November of 2010) I remember reading somewhere that the point of geocaching was to bring people to interesting places they would normally not visit/see.

 

A little over a year on I question whether everyone believes in that; I see many caches that were just dropped somewhere of no importance, often just to have been placed there. My intent when placing caches is to specifically place them somewhere interesting you may not normally find, or to provide some odd form of entertainment. I also view it as a way to showcase your creatvity in hides and containers, thereby justifying hiding spots that are of no particular importance.

 

This being the case I'm trying to figure out why YOU geocache. Specifically why you place things where you do, but also to see why you got into the activity.

 

And... go!

 

+++1

I wish that were the case for every hider but some people will insist that the cache and location matters little. If they provide a piece of paper that you can squeeze your initials into with a write-on-wet-paper pen that's all that's required. And they should get a pat on the back for providing it (.....every .1 miles for miles and miles).

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As well, does every interesting cache need to have swag? I have a lovely cache that will hold no swag but is extremely crafty and entertaining. Just because it doesn't have the ability to contain swag does that make it any less valid?

 

I don't enjoy micro (no-swag) size caches hidden because it's cheap, easy to hide and whose sole purpose is to up the find count. But I do like micros that are crafty and placed to entertain or to bring people to a scenic or historic spot where a larger cache won't fit.

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I have many reasons.

 

I originally did it because my daughter said I was becoming a couch potato. A co-carpooler told me about this sport/game and I went out bought a gps and found a few caches nearby.

Yes I have found many interesting things/places while caching. And yes some lame ones. But it became both fun and addicting.

Gives me excuses to go to different places.

And I made more friends doing this then anything else I've done.

I've also learned how to use a gps, project, create and solve some puzzles and always learning more as I cache with others.

Edited by jellis
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[fire hydrant hides should be banned. they're usually very small and could jam the impellars in a firetruck. imagine how you'd feel to be told a micro geocache jammed in the truck and thats why your house burned to the ground. :surprise:

 

This is probably one of the best fire hydrant hide ever. Of course none of these are active and it's in front of the fire department, where the firemen stare at you as you try to find it, they've even been known to heckle cachers until they find it. :laughing:

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So back when I started geocaching (October/November of 2010) I remember reading somewhere that the point of geocaching was to bring people to interesting places they would normally not visit/see.

 

A little over a year on I question whether everyone believes in that; I see many caches that were just dropped somewhere of no importance, often just to have been placed there. My intent when placing caches is to specifically place them somewhere interesting you may not normally find, or to provide some odd form of entertainment. I also view it as a way to showcase your creatvity in hides and containers, thereby justifying hiding spots that are of no particular importance.

 

This being the case I'm trying to figure out why YOU geocache. Specifically why you place things where you do, but also to see why you got into the activity.

 

And... go!

Agree with you totally. geoccaching was initially a scientific enterprise, then it developed into the game that brought you to interesting places and into the open air, now its all about the numbers, shsame. i have 9 caches hidden around southern ireland and i have placed them in interesting areas. mahon2011

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I started caching as it was one of several ways to get away from the TV.

I conitnued caching because it takes me to cool places.

One can either focus on the 1 in 10 great caches, 7 in 10 mediocre caches, or 2 in 10 sucky caches. I prefer focusing on the postive. Call it depression prevention.

I continue to cache because get to go hang out with really cool people.

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One can only speak for oneself really. The beauty of caching is there are so many ways to play, so many styles - and not one of them are wrong. As opinionated and firey as I am, the last thing I would ever do is criticzie someone for how the play. Often many play for the numbers game even the FTF portion and it is a topic of criticism. And it should not be. Personally, I don't play for numbers or ftf's, but those who do, great! No cache to me is sucky except the one that is missing ;-).

 

Why I play? I been hiking on and off trail since I have been a teen whenever I went camping with the family, or going up into the poconos with my friend to his das mountain house. Caching now adds even more purpose to it and takes me to places I couldn't have symbled upon if I tried. As much gameland hiking as I have done in NC here, I never ran across some of the things I did when caching, such as old cemetaries with tombstones 300 years old up until the 60's when a river was damned to create the lakes here. Old family plots long since forgotten. Its places and things like that, that without caching, I wouldn't have seen. I would have never considered paddling if it werent for caching.

 

best part is, is it brings such joy to my kids, that you cannot buy from toys are us the kind of excitement it generates when they find a cache.

 

but to steal a quote and alter it a bit "why do you cache" "because its there" ;-)

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I started caching as it was one of several ways to get away from the TV.

I conitnued caching because it takes me to cool places.

One can either focus on the 1 in 10 great caches, 7 in 10 mediocre caches, or 2 in 10 sucky caches. I prefer focusing on the postive. Call it depression prevention.

I continue to cache because get to go hang out with really cool people.

I was going to post similar...but Moose Mob did a better job then I would have done. I never really was a "social" person prior to caching...but I love going to events and meeting cachers. The camping events in the Fall have become a tradition for a small group of us and I look forward to it each and every year...

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Good question. Here are the reasons for geocaching that I have seen:

1. Being introduced to new, interesting, or historical places.

2. To provide some interest on a hike.

3. Companionship, and several different forms of it by the way. Some people like looking for caches with family or others, some like the team work aspect, even if one of the team is only involved with the planning/solving part of the find.

4. The fun of figuring out a clever hide, often in plain sight.

5. Hiding or finding very difficult caches.

6. Competitiveness, getting more finds than somebody else or getting them faster.

7. Finding cool swag.

8. The cool factor of finding something that not everybody knows about.

 

There are probably several other reasons. Myself, what draws me most are items 1 and 4. Items 2, 3, and 8 have had their appeal to me, and I have chased a few FTFs so maybe 6 could be argued. I guess they are all valid reasons since the game is so different for everybody.

 

I have to admit I don’t understand the “people hide poor caches” complaint. I don’t think the owner owes you anything other than the cache being accurately listed. If you don’t like parking lots, (or power trails or long hikes, or whatever) leave them alone.

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So back when I started geocaching (October/November of 2010) I remember reading somewhere that the point of geocaching was to bring people to interesting places they would normally not visit/see.

 

A little over a year on I question whether everyone believes in that; I see many caches that were just dropped somewhere of no importance, often just to have been placed there. My intent when placing caches is to specifically place them somewhere interesting you may not normally find, or to provide some odd form of entertainment. I also view it as a way to showcase your creatvity in hides and containers, thereby justifying hiding spots that are of no particular importance.

 

This being the case I'm trying to figure out why YOU geocache. Specifically why you place things where you do, but also to see why you got into the activity.

 

And... go!

 

What's the point?

 

To have some fun.

 

Yes, it is just that simple.

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To see what kinds of weird hiding places people come up with, and what kinds of weird containers, and what kinds of weird stuff people think of to put IN to those containers... I love how different everybodies minds work! That and the beautiful places, interesting history, etc. etc. Getting out of the house and out of our routines.

 

Momma Caswell

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This is my point of geocaching:

 

70afcb0b-326b-4738-8983-00696f1857d7.jpg

 

That's me holding the sign and the rest of my family around me. In the big picture I don't care where it is, what it looks like, or what you put in it. I don't even care if we FIND it. Our adventures and memories are what makes it all worthwhile.

 

 

* even parking lot caches... imagine six people trying to be stealthy as they crowd around a lamp post. We look like Canada's Worst Ninjas. :blink:

Your comments and that great picture epitomizes what I think geocaching is all about. If my math is correct, you'll soon need to change your name to 7NoisyHikers, lol!

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Some people place a cache simply because they can. I've seen plenty of cache pages where the CO explicit states "I placed a cache because there wasn't a cache here yet".

 

I want geocaching to take interesting places. I've learned to filter out the stuff that probably wont interest me.

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From the start there has never been only one reason to geocache. Some of the early adopters in looking for an explanation of why they enjoyed this so much, noted that many (though certainly not all) geocaches took them to interesting areas they would not have visited or even known about otherwise. A few began touting this as the purpose of geocaching.

 

It is not the point of geocaching, of course. The point of geocaching is to find objects hidden by others, preferably using a GPS. While some people may enjoy it more when this object is hidden in an interesting location, it is presumptuous to assume that everyone finds this the most enjoyable part of geocaching.

 

Groundspeak hasn't helped either, with guidelines that suggest you think about the reasons you pick an area for a geocache - even quoting briansnat's opinion on the matter. The existence of virtual caches has also contributed to the myth that caches should be in interesting places (even though the "wow" requirement never applied to physical caches).

 

I like saying the following only because of the reaction it gets from geocachers:

 

If you want a hobby whose point is to take you to interesting places you should try Waymarking. Explore the categories to see which are interesting to you (and yes, some people find McDonald's restaurants interesting), then go and visit. No geocache to find (because that isn't the point, is it? :unsure:), just lots of interesting places. I agree that with the exception of few categories like Best Kept Secrets, you might not find places "you would not normally have visited". I suspect that Waymarking would interest more people if there were more categories that tried to do this. But at least here you have a database of places that someone found interesting enough to list, rather than telling people who just want to hide a cache at the strip mall down the street that they are missing the point.

Edited by tozainamboku
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We cache for many reasons.

1) When we started, our youngest was 3. He is now 8. He leaned to read way above his age/grade level due to caching at historical markers, points of interest, reading log books, and cache descriptions.

2) He has learned a lot about computers, math, geography, geology, the environment and history through caching.

3) We have made some long trips (including a cross country move) that caching allowed us to learn about our destinations prior to the trip.

4) You get extremely close to family members when you are loaded up in your car with a goal in mind for a long time.

5) You meet lots of new people along the way.

6) You get to discover new ideas and learn things you might have missed in your normal, boring life.

7) And as corny as this sounds, the photos, logs and finds along the way have provided us with an on line memory to share with others. It is, at least to us, much nicer than places like Facebook or myspace.

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.

 

The "lure" of geocaching was to enjoy interesting spots, learn of places you would not have otherwise known about, and to enjoy a creative, adult version of hide and seek.

 

The 'reality" of geocaching is that it exists for the Frog to make money. Everything else is secondary. Since quality is irrelevant to the Frog, and the creature has no respect for cache owners, other than to collect their money, many who were "lured" for the higher level value of the hobby have since learned the "reality" and they have slowly walked away, thus leaving you with the natural question they have already answered, What is the point?

 

.

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.

 

The "lure" of geocaching was to enjoy interesting spots, learn of places you would not have otherwise known about, and to enjoy a creative, adult version of hide and seek.

 

The 'reality" of geocaching is that it exists for the Frog to make money. Everything else is secondary. Since quality is irrelevant to the Frog, and the creature has no respect for cache owners, other than to collect their money, many who were "lured" for the higher level value of the hobby have since learned the "reality" and they have slowly walked away, thus leaving you with the natural question they have already answered, What is the point?

 

.

I'm not so sure I agree with everything you've said, emmett. Except for, "adult version of hide and seek", I still find the "lure" of geocaching very satisfying and I'm always promoting the family benefits of it. I annually pay my membership dues and receive added "perks" but I've never been pressed by any staff at Groundspeak for additional funds. Finally, there certainly are trashy hides out there which we can ignore looking for, but I'm positive that long-time cachers with very high numbers don't mind them at all.

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So back when I started geocaching (October/November of 2010) I remember reading somewhere that the point of geocaching was to bring people to interesting places they would normally not visit/see.

A little over a year on I question whether everyone believes in that; I see many caches that were just dropped somewhere of no importance, often just to have been placed there. My intent when placing caches is to specifically place them somewhere interesting you may not normally find, or to provide some odd form of entertainment. I also view it as a way to showcase your creatvity in hides and containers, thereby justifying hiding spots that are of no particular importance.

 

This being the case I'm trying to figure out why YOU geocache. Specifically why you place things where you do, but also to see why you got into the activity.

 

And... go!

 

Pretty much that's why I continued caching. I enjoy see new places and learning history. I also enjoy solving puzzles, so that aspect of Geocaching is appealing to me.

I still enjoy the thrill of the hunt. I generally avoid using a PAF and will gladly take DNF if I've truly been stumped.

 

I guess it just bugs me to see hundred of uninteresting geocaches all placed in parking lots and under fire hydrants. Fun though the challenge to find them with muggles around may be, it all rings a little hollow.

 

Do you like every song on the radio?

There is a lot of crap out there. It's easy enough to skip past the caches you don't like.

 

As well, does every interesting cache need to have swag? I have a lovely cache that will hold no swag but is extremely crafty and entertaining. Just because it doesn't have the ability to contain swag does that make it any less valid?

 

Nope. If the cache container is water proof, will stand up to the elements and will not get damaged by multiple people opening and closing the container. Remember, not everyone will be a gentle as you are with it, but, if it holds up to a little abuse it's a good container.

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The "lure" of geocaching was to enjoy interesting spots, learn of places you would not have otherwise known about, and to enjoy a creative, adult version of hide and seek.

 

The 'reality" of geocaching is that it exists for the Frog to make money. Everything else is secondary. Since quality is irrelevant to the Frog, and the creature has no respect for cache owners, other than to collect their money, many who were "lured" for the higher level value of the hobby have since learned the "reality" and they have slowly walked away, thus leaving you with the natural question they have already answered, What is the point?

 

I still love geocaching but there are days like yesterday when I received the weekly GC newsletter and read:

 

You're back from a full day of heart-racing geocaching. It's a blur of adventure, discovery and maybe a couple of bug bites. You sit down to log your geocaches and claim your well-deserved smileys. You know you looked at the geocaches before you left.
But wait, which geocaches did you actually find?

 

The answer to that question could just be a click away. Now you're able to log into Geocaching.com and check out, "Recently Viewed Geocaches" on
. The last 50 viewed geocaches are saved in your profile for 10 days.

 

You can also find "Recently Viewed Geocaches" by selecting "Log a Cache" in the Play section of the top navigation.
The new feature will save you time and may get you smileys faster
, but it probably won't save you any bug bites.

 

(Bolded text mine). It does seem that the Frog is all about the numbers - encouraging people to go out and find so many caches that they can't remember which ones they found. Getting your smiley count recorded ASAP is more important then remembering each of the caches we visit. Sigh.

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Please allow me a bit of poetic license as I quote Robert Traver (aka John Voelker)'s "Why I Fish". I think it is appropriate to explain what the point of geocaching is for me, at least:

 

THE TESTAMENT OF A FISHERMAN_ Robert Traver 1964

Posted on January 7, 2009 by mountainriverjournal

Robert Traver 1964, (Judge John Voelker 1903-93)

Because I love the environs where trout are found, which are invariably beautiful, and hate the environs where crowds of people are found, which are invariably ugly;

 

Because, in a world where most men seem to spend their lives doing things they hate, my fishing is at once an endless source of delight and an act of small rebellion;

 

Because I suspect that men are going along this way for the last time, and I for one don’t want to waste the trip; because mercifully there are no telephones on trout waters;

 

Because bourbon out of an old tin cup always tastes better out there;

 

And, finally, not because I regard fishing as being so terribly important but because I suspect that so many of the other concerns of men are equally unimportant – and not nearly so much fun.

 

Edited by knowschad
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Please allow me a bit of poetic license as I quote Robert Traver (aka John Voelker)'s "Why I Fish". I think it is appropriate to explain what the point of geocaching is for me, at least:

 

THE TESTAMENT OF A FISHERMAN_ Robert Traver 1964

Posted on January 7, 2009 by mountainriverjournal

Robert Traver 1964, (Judge John Voelker 1903-93)

Because I love the environs where trout are found, which are invariably beautiful, and hate the environs where crowds of people are found, which are invariably ugly;

 

Because, in a world where most men seem to spend their lives doing things they hate, my fishing is at once an endless source of delight and an act of small rebellion;

 

Because I suspect that men are going along this way for the last time, and I for one don’t want to waste the trip; because mercifully there are no telephones on trout waters;

 

Because bourbon out of an old tin cup always tastes better out there;

 

And, finally, not because I regard fishing as being so terribly important but because I suspect that so many of the other concerns of men are equally unimportant – and not nearly so much fun.

 

Wow.

 

I like that. Very well said quoted.

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I've always loved walking in different places, whether that's trails, parks, or just the stray neighborhood or strip mall or country road. When I started caching, I discovered it's a perfect motivator for such jaunts. So it's me taking an interest in that parking lot where the lamp post is that's important, and it doesn't matter much whether the CO had a good reason to bring me there.

 

Times are changing, geocaching is exploding -- I had to laugh at the poster that seemed surprised geocaching.com had a motive to push people to find more caches -- so there are lots and lots of less than stellar caches being planted. I think that's the wave of the future, and there's not really much anyone can do about it. So I suggest focusing on going places you'll enjoy, enjoying the places you go, and treat the caches as a extra bonus. And celebrate the good ones, for sure.

 

Oh, and swag's a thing of the past. Like good locations and clever containers, good swag can be much appreciated, but increasingly I'm finding most cachers don't care about it, and COs in my area feel no requirement to provide for it, although many still like to.

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Why? Because we have enough stress and worry and business in this one time through life.

 

Why? Because we may never pass the way of where a particular cache is again and I want to see this one area God created.

 

Why? because time with my family in any form in a venue we enjoy is worth it.

 

Why? because the creativity of many a cache hider may not be seen or admired without thiss type of adventure.

 

why? because we love it.:)

 

Thanks

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And it bugs me when others complain about caches they don't like. If you don't like them, then just don't go look for them.

 

It bugs me when people say "If you don't like them, then just don't go look for them". How do you know you wont like it unless you go and look for it?

I'm sorry. What I really meant was that, oftentimes, you can tell if a cache is going to be a LPC in a parking lot as opposed to an ammo can on a hike. It just sort of bothers me when somebody goes out and finds an LPC when the description clearly shows that's what it is, and then logs an unkind remark about LPCs in general when logging their find. You are right that you can't always tell whether you will like a cache until you find it.

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Live and let live. If something doesn't affect you don't let it bother you.

Seriously, someone should quote that. It'd make the world a better place. Take credit, I don't care.

 

The point of geocaching is the tip of the pen that I use to write my name in the log. Sometimes that's all there is. If it seems pointless, I won't sign..

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This is my point of geocaching:

 

*SNIP*

 

That's me holding the sign and the rest of my family around me. In the big picture I don't care where it is, what it looks like, or what you put in it. I don't even care if we FIND it. Our adventures and memories are what makes it all worthwhile.

 

This

 

* even parking lot caches... imagine six people trying to be stealthy as they crowd around a lamp post. We look like Canada's Worst Ninjas. :blink:

 

I'm a social worker thus one of my jobs is taking developmentally and/or physically challenged folks out into the community. Lately we've been geocaching as an activity. Can you imagine a fidgety guy (because his Ritalin doesn't work as well when he's excited), a guy in a wheel chair and an old fart (me) looking stealthy anywhere? :lol:

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