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va griz

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Everything posted by va griz

  1. A couple terms: Topic: What you are talking about. In this case, a tough multi cache. Thread: When you click on "Start A New Topic", you are opening up a thread. Post: Each reply to a topic is a post. Free advice: Some people skim the first post and inflict their thoughts on the topic immediately. For that reason and others, very few people are willing to repeat their advice even if you don't get it on the first reading. If you don't understand, read it a few more times instead of asking the poster to repeat themselves. If you are still confused, ask a specific question about what has you puzzled.
  2. I don't see the point of locking an account for a cacher who is MIA. Locally there was a cache by a young man that was a good idea but had some issues. He straightened out most of them but sort of faded away and didn't respond to emails about the cache, as teenagers sometimes do. After a while the complaints resulted in the cache being archived. I Fixed the remaining issues and relisted it with a mention of the original owner. A year or two later he checked back in and sent a nice email thanking me for keeping it going. A small example perhaps, but why should he be locked out for losing interest at one point?
  3. The most excellent Ghost Train comes to mind. The size isn't specified but since there is an ammo can in the gallery I am hopefully not revealing any state secrets.
  4. My best guess, and it's just a guess, is that you can do it if you lay it out so the finder needs to look up information to get the coordinates. The fact that they learn by doing that is coincidental, and whether or not they conclude that tolerance is good is up to them. If you say on the cache page that you are trying to teach tolerance then you are spelling out your agenda. By the way, I found a cache that required you to look up facts in bible verses to get the coordinates. I thought it was well done.
  5. If you are still looking for a source for a long wooden dowel you might try just cutting the handle off an old broom. If that's not as thick as you're looking for, a good hardware store will have handles for shovels, that should be fat enough. As for the hole, it will be almost impossible to drill a hole through the center. You could saw it in half lengthwise and carve out the center, but do the wires have to run through the center? You could route out a groove on the side, and just cover the wires with filler such as RTV or wood putty.
  6. Absolutely perfect, the golden rule of geocaching.
  7. I need to sharpen my pencil in order to sign the log.
  8. As long as you make sure the container will leak or not hold up long, assure the coordinates are off about 40 feet, and place it so the searcher will need to poke around somebodies front door, then it should be fine.
  9. I've never thought about that aspect before. For what it's worth, at least in many coastal states such as mine (Virginia) there will be so many caches that are so close to zero feet in elevation that there would be no practical way to say which is the lowest. Some are underwater, so maybe that would simplify the quest.
  10. I too am having a hard time understanding the whole problem. I suspect that at least part of it is the difference between "american" english and the across the pond version. At any rate, if I may cut to the chase: What do you think should happen to make the situation more tolerable for you?
  11. Some of you have looked awfully hard to find comments that could be considered boastful. To me they are simply sharing the good feeling a lot of people get from finding a cache first, especially a difficult one. Yes there is a little pride showing through, but so what. I've seen much more boastful logs and wasn't offended. Given the totality of his well written logs, such as complimenting the location, the hide itself, the CO, etc, I would say they are fine posts and I would be happy to have them on one of my caches. I hope that wasn't too offensive?
  12. The biggest problem I've seen for brand new cachers is focusing on the GPS to try and get right on top of the cache. Look at your surroundings, not at the little screen. With experience you will start seeing possible locations before you get there. As others have said, there's no substitute for getting out there and looking. Good luck.
  13. From what I can see there is a duct of some sort against a building on the left. I can't see the bottom of it but there may be some possibilities there. If that's a storm drain further down you could use fishing line to hang a micro under it, somewhat common in a few areas. The handrail on the right side may offer some possibilities but again I can't see it well. Good luck.
  14. I can understand the rule against digging holes, even with permission, because of the perceptions that it creates. But I don't understand a blanket ban on fence posts. I'm sure there are places where they would be a bad idea, but there are also spots where it's no more destructive than walking on the ground.
  15. I used to use paper egg cartons filled with either wadded up newspaper or DRY sawdust, then pour in wax. You cut the cups apart and the somewhat ragged edges are easy to light, and they burn about 10 minutes. The canned cardboard trick sounds good too. I might try that with a small cat food can to save space. Another useful material is Jute twine. It's cheap, and when "unwound" the fibers will even catch a spark from a ferro rod. It burns pretty fast, but can be used as a tinder bundle to start the rest of the fire.
  16. Not much for me. Most parks and campgrounds prohibit cutting vegetation, I believe mostly to keep people from taking flowers or cutting down trees for firewood. But even if they didn't I wouldn't do any trimming of bushes or ground cover, it's just not right.
  17. Most of my finds seem to be with the sun in my eyes, getting bit by some bug or another, in the freezing rain, and it's uphill to AND from the cache. I think those conditions should be required for a full smiley. Now that brings up the question, does a half smiley and two quarter smiles count as a complete find? (All in jest mind you)
  18. As others have said, the idea of three dimensional camo is a good one. But I think the stuff you linked to is for models, in other words it is scaled down too much. You might try looking in the lawn and garden or floral stores to find what amounts to artificial grass. I've seen plastic leaves, ivy in particular, that looked so real it was hard to tell it was plastic when mixed in with the real stuff.
  19. Good question. Here are the reasons for geocaching that I have seen: 1. Being introduced to new, interesting, or historical places. 2. To provide some interest on a hike. 3. Companionship, and several different forms of it by the way. Some people like looking for caches with family or others, some like the team work aspect, even if one of the team is only involved with the planning/solving part of the find. 4. The fun of figuring out a clever hide, often in plain sight. 5. Hiding or finding very difficult caches. 6. Competitiveness, getting more finds than somebody else or getting them faster. 7. Finding cool swag. 8. The cool factor of finding something that not everybody knows about. There are probably several other reasons. Myself, what draws me most are items 1 and 4. Items 2, 3, and 8 have had their appeal to me, and I have chased a few FTFs so maybe 6 could be argued. I guess they are all valid reasons since the game is so different for everybody. I have to admit I don’t understand the “people hide poor caches” complaint. I don’t think the owner owes you anything other than the cache being accurately listed. If you don’t like parking lots, (or power trails or long hikes, or whatever) leave them alone.
  20. That's what I was thinking, it's just a matter of time before a finder thinks the challenge is to find a way to remove the cover.
  21. I almost hunted one like that. The description talked about going by the brand new WalMart and placing a cache there. But the coords were in the middle of the woods near where I live, and as anybody who has seen a WalMart will know, they are never hidden in the middle of a forest. The one degree of west error would require driving about 160 miles one way because of the Chesepeake Bay, so I didn't look. But it remained unfound for a while because the publication and the coord change are based off the proximity to the mistaken area. So it waited until a local noticed it magically popped up on the map.
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