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First encounter with curious cows today


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On my way to get http://coord.info/GC2RVGX and ended up in a relatively new situation.

 

I reached GZ for the cache, guessed where abouts it was when a herd of cows entered from an adjacent field. I am relatively new to caching "in the wilderness", as i used to prefer park and grabs previously, so was a little paranoid at the approaching cattle. I exited the field by the nearby gate and waited a little

 

The cows went for their water and grazed in the field, but a couple approached the gate and entered into a staring contest which im sure was a bad idea. I walked away, they tried to keep me in view, so i went round a corner and waited a bit

 

By this point I realised the cache was out, but I still had to get through that field back to the car, and back to work.

 

To cut a long boring story short, the cows kept staring everytime I tried to enter the field, which was quite offputting, but eventually I just went for it, hugged the fence, tried not to run or walk fast, and made my way across the field

 

They followed slowly which was fine as I was still walking faster them

 

Got back to work and mentioned it to a colleague and he couldnt help but laugh, he went on to tell stories of him charging half naked at a herd because they were munching on his tent whilst out camping and any noise would have scared them off, and that they are very calm and dosile. Couldnt tell if any bulls were involved

 

I can understand trying to wade through a herd that were in arms reach, but I feel a bit silly now when they were 10-15 feet away :anicute:

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We were in a similar situation a few weeks back, and had to go back through a field of cows and calves. We stood at the gate and waved our arms and shouted a bit and they slowly moved off. I seemed to be ahead and there was one larger cow hanging back and staring at me, so I flapped my arms up and down again and shouted 'go ON' to her. She gave me another stare then headed off with the rest. Mr F caught up with me after a bit and said 'so you told that bull, then!' me: 'no, it's a cow, it's got udders' Mr F: 'they're not udders.' He was right of course, it was a very large bull! :o:laughing:

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Never underestimate cows or take them for granted. We did, and always just walked straight through fields of cows 'knowing' that if we shouted and waved our arms they would run away.

 

Until one fateful day on Hawks Tor Bodmin, when walking back past a herd of cows along a public footpath one decided to charge and they all followed suit.

Never been so scared in all my life as I realised these things could really move, were very angry at us and meant business.

We had nowhere to go.

 

Tinker was knocked to the ground and once down the cow kept on at him with legs and heads.

I was slightly luckier and stayed on my feet but couldn't get anywhere near him to help. I was just shouting and trying to distract them.

 

Eventually he struggled to his feet and we managed somehow to make it to a gate - it's still a blur how that happened to this day.

 

The cows were all female, with calves. No bulls.

We had dogs with us which had legged it as soon as the attack began (it is having the dogs that caused the problem I think).

The stupid thing is we had walked past the same herd on the way up the tor and they didn't even look at us really. That's why we were so shocked at how sudden it all was on the way back down.

 

At the hospital Tinker had 6 cracked and bruised ribs and was off work for weeks.

 

We will never ever treat cows in the same way again and like you, hesitate at every stile or gateway where there are cows in the field.

 

We tentatively and slowly walk round the edge of the field staying near any fence we can jump over (barbed wire or not) watching them to see what their reaction to us is at all times.

If one of them gets up or starts to move toward us I am usually over the fence.

All the time my heart is beating 10 times faster until we are clear of the field.

 

So I for one don't think you are being silly. Caution is always good in my book, as I have seen what damage they can do and how quickly a seemingly innocent situation can turn into something potentially nasty. It only seems to take one to run at you and they all start.

 

We would never again walk through a field of cows with dogs (we don't have them now anyway) nor will I walk through a field of cows with young. We'll abandon our walk or find another route.

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My understanding is that if you have dogs with you, cows are a lot more worried, because they understand (better than we do) that a dog isn't a cuddly fluffy pet, it's a carnivore whose natural prey is young calves, and who have teeth that are adapted for biting flesh.

 

I'm never bothered by cows, even if they decide to follow me across the field. If they get too close, I stop, turn round, and say "Poot" to them, and they back off.

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My understanding is that if you have dogs with you, cows are a lot more worried, because they understand (better than we do) that a dog isn't a cuddly fluffy pet, it's a carnivore whose natural prey is young calves, and who have teeth that are adapted for biting flesh.

 

I'm never bothered by cows, even if they decide to follow me across the field. If they get too close, I stop, turn round, and say "Poot" to them, and they back off.

 

POOT?

 

Darn, wish we'd known that, we were saying 'SHOO'. No wonder they took no notice :laughing:

 

Does Poot work in a Cornish dialect? :yikes:

 

And yes it was definitely the combination of dogs and calves that caused it all to kick off, although it had never been an issue before, just wrong time wrong place I guess. And a herd of grumpy cows.

 

Stupidly though, although we dropped the dogs leads and they had legged it, the cows didn't go after them, they continued to attack us. And we couldn't have eaten a whole calf. We'd had sandwiches up on the tor.

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That sounds very frightening indeed. I got chased by a herd of cows on my first encounter with them. My second encounter went better after I'd learnt the 'waving hands and shouting" method.

 

However, during a holiday in Devon last week I appraoched a herd of 'cows' in a field and they all scattered but they soon regained confidence and headed back towards me. As I was about a third of the way up the field, they were surrounding me on three sides and it was at that point that I realised these were heffers and not cows. A couple of ramblers in the next field up the hill stopped to watch the encounter and at that point, I decided that discretion was the better part of valour and slowly reversed back across the field followed by the heffers. Very frightening.

 

Just this week I entered a field full of cows which seemed OK but a few stopped to watch me. I then realised that amongst he cows there were bulls too and they were the ones watching. I walked along the fence, ready to jump over at any minute and as I got to the end if the field I turned a corner and there were a load of the animals stood right by the stile and they weren't moving. I was 20 metres from the cache but after a while decided to leave it and return another day. It's really not worth the risk.

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I think the most scary aspect is how an innocent activity that you have done a hundred times before (walking through a field with a few cows in it) can suddenly and dramatically turn into a situation where you can be seriously hurt, or worse, and there is no one there to help.

That's the sinister part of it, you are just not expecting anything bad to happen.

 

Now of course we are more careful and fully aware of what could happen and how quickly a situation can develop. We will back out much quicker now than we ever would have before.

 

I guess it is like these warnings about weather changing when you are up on the moors and to be prepared. It all seems like scare mongering when you are wandering around in glorious sunshine in tee shirt and shorts. Until you have seen the cloud come down and can no longer see your way. Then it suddenly becomes a very threatening situation, out of nothing.

 

I don't want to scare people, but we've read of several bad incidents since our encounter 6 years ago, and while it is very very rare, it can happen, and the consequences can be severe. It's always worth exercising a bit of caution, because nothing will happen 99 times, but it could on the 100th.

Edited by Lovejoy and Tinker
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Depending on what and where they are, cows have the capacity to make me apprehensive, nervous, or just plain scared. I think that's probably a good thing. When I can find a way around their field I take it. When I can't, I hope my apprehension/nervousness/fear mean I continue to choose correctly whether to venture into their territory or to back out. I know I wouldn't have the bravura to try the POOT option!

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I've always been extremely wary of cows mainly due to lack of exposure with them but mostly I ignore them and they've either watched me around or some have been nosey and come and said hi which again is fine as I can tell the difference.

 

However, having now experienced them with dogs that is another matter!! I kept her on a lead from them and under control but the other week I had to go through a field of them and although we stayed away they all turn as a herd and stampeded us as we walked through, I know you're by supposed to run and at first I walked away and backed off however they kept charging and we basically had to sprint away to stop something happening to us!

 

If I now pass a field with cows in and the dog most of the time I'll by go through the field or it depends on the cows body language, my OH says walk slow let them watch you and don't be alarmed (he was a farmers son) I'll tend to keep routes with potential cows to te weekend when the OH comes with me and he can deal with them now!!

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I've always been extremely wary of cows mainly due to lack of exposure with them but mostly I ignore them and they've either watched me around or some have been nosey and come and said hi which again is fine as I can tell the difference.

 

However, having now experienced them with dogs that is another matter!! I kept her on a lead from them and under control but the other week I had to go through a field of them and although we stayed away they all turn as a herd and stampeded us as we walked through, I know you're by supposed to run and at first I walked away and backed off however they kept charging and we basically had to sprint away to stop something happening to us!

 

If I now pass a field with cows in and the dog most of the time I'll by go through the field or it depends on the cows body language, my OH says walk slow let them watch you and don't be alarmed (he was a farmers son) I'll tend to keep routes with potential cows to te weekend when the OH comes with me and he can deal with them now!!

 

Look at it from the point of view of the cows. A carnivore has entered the field, they can't run away because the field has hedges. So their best bet is to gang up on the potential cow-eater and try to kill it.

 

Cows probably don't understand about leads, or about dogs being "under control".

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Cows, I hate cows, I grew up in the countryside and I know they can be unpredictable. Even a slight 'nudge' from something the size a a fully grown cow could take some time to recover from...

 

Attached is a log entry submitted by me some time ago.

 

September 25, 2010 by Croesgadwr (358 found)

 

Cows.., millions of 'em. "I ain't scared of no cows" I thought. All in one corner, eating away... apart from one, who was moo'ing away in the centre of the field. Onward I thought, "you got the clue so go look for it"....so I'm looking for the cache but I'm aware of a change in the tone of the 'lone-cows' moo'ing... Surely its not protecting the cache?? No, its a bull...and its protecting his cows! Protecting them from me! Shi(ft) I thought... Grabbed the cache & legged it up the lane out of sight of the 'BIG COW', who was waiting for me (to return the cache, very clever these BIG COWS)...it took a full ten minutes for him to move on, I crept back down to GZ, dropped the cache back in place then back up towards Highbrook...

Signed log & legged it to be concise...

Cheers for the adrenaline rush.

Edited by Croesgadwr
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This thread reminded me of a previous encounter I had with Cows. I went back and found the log I remember recording as follows:

 

Found by the legochugglers. I have a golden rule never to do anything other than obvious cache and dash searches when dressed in a suit and tie. Unfortunately I broke this rule on this occasion and now regret it. Realised as I got out of the car that I had about 150 metres of cow field to cross, thought about turning back but then thought I'm here now just go for it. Setting off in my new brogues it was soon clear that the watching cows in this field had a severe bowel problem and here I was skipping between them over to the cache site. Bagged the cache easy enough, pocketed the GPS and went to commence my return journey only to be faced by the biggest bull I have ever seen, snorting and staring at my bright red tie. 'Oh deary me' I exclaimed. We eyed each other up for what seemed like an eternity when he finally decided to saunter off. I started my escape in the opposite direction walking like an olympic long distance walker with all thoughts of the slimy pats ignored. What I hadnt bargained for is that on the movement of the bull to the far side of the field the other 40 cows would commence a virtual stampeded to join him with me getting splatted from all sides in the rush. I went home and had a shower (my brogues are in the garage). I will certainly remember this cache. TFTC.

 

The brogues never did recover!!

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Don't get me wrong here, we have had our (VERY FAIR) amount of run-ins with cows and had similar or worse experiences as those above.

Just a thought, I have often wondered, If, when you are being chased by cows, you just stood still in the middle of the field and let them come? What exactly would they do to you? Have they got a mouth full of sharp teeth like a dog? Have they got razor-like talons like an eagle? Have they got a shot of venom to hit your eyes and blind you like some snakes? Are they likely to pounce on you like a Polar Bear? What would happen if you simply 'stood still' instead of running away?

Don't get me wrong here, I'm with the rest of you and have always given heel but can someone tell me (granted, they are massive and intimidating) what exactly they would do to you if you just stood still with a big stick waving in the air?

Never tried it, probably never will, just interested.

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Don't get me wrong here, we have had our (VERY FAIR) amount of run-ins with cows and had similar or worse experiences as those above.

Just a thought, I have often wondered, If, when you are being chased by cows, you just stood still in the middle of the field and let them come? What exactly would they do to you? Have they got a mouth full of sharp teeth like a dog? Have they got razor-like talons like an eagle? Have they got a shot of venom to hit your eyes and blind you like some snakes? Are they likely to pounce on you like a Polar Bear? What would happen if you simply 'stood still' instead of running away?

Don't get me wrong here, I'm with the rest of you and have always given heel but can someone tell me (granted, they are massive and intimidating) what exactly they would do to you if you just stood still with a big stick waving in the air?

Never tried it, probably never will, just interested.

Push you over! Then they keep on running so they all stamp all over you and break some ribs and other bones. Maybe some will realise you're not a threat now you're lying on the floor and come back and kick you a few times to make sure. They might dribble a little too. That is unless you're being charged by a bull. You wouldn't be worrying about something like dribble with a bull.

Edited by Fianccetto
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Don't get me wrong here, we have had our (VERY FAIR) amount of run-ins with cows and had similar or worse experiences as those above.

Just a thought, I have often wondered, If, when you are being chased by cows, you just stood still in the middle of the field and let them come? What exactly would they do to you? Have they got a mouth full of sharp teeth like a dog? Have they got razor-like talons like an eagle? Have they got a shot of venom to hit your eyes and blind you like some snakes? Are they likely to pounce on you like a Polar Bear? What would happen if you simply 'stood still' instead of running away?

Don't get me wrong here, I'm with the rest of you and have always given heel but can someone tell me (granted, they are massive and intimidating) what exactly they would do to you if you just stood still with a big stick waving in the air?

Never tried it, probably never will, just interested.

 

Interesting question, any volunteers?

 

Average man = 14 stone

Average cow = 30 stone + (at say 15mph)

 

I am sure there is a well known mathematical equation for this one!

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Don't get me wrong here, we have had our (VERY FAIR) amount of run-ins with cows and had similar or worse experiences as those above.

Just a thought, I have often wondered, If, when you are being chased by cows, you just stood still in the middle of the field and let them come? What exactly would they do to you? Have they got a mouth full of sharp teeth like a dog? Have they got razor-like talons like an eagle? Have they got a shot of venom to hit your eyes and blind you like some snakes? Are they likely to pounce on you like a Polar Bear? What would happen if you simply 'stood still' instead of running away?

Don't get me wrong here, I'm with the rest of you and have always given heel but can someone tell me (granted, they are massive and intimidating) what exactly they would do to you if you just stood still with a big stick waving in the air?

Never tried it, probably never will, just interested.

 

Interesting question, any volunteers?

 

Average man = 14 stone

Average cow = 30 stone + (at say 15mph)

 

I am sure there is a well known mathematical equation for this one!

Yes, I agree but this only solidifies the point I have already made... they are big and intimidating but WHAT would happen if you just 'stood still' with a big stick waving in the air?

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Don't get me wrong here, we have had our (VERY FAIR) amount of run-ins with cows and had similar or worse experiences as those above.

Just a thought, I have often wondered, If, when you are being chased by cows, you just stood still in the middle of the field and let them come? What exactly would they do to you? Have they got a mouth full of sharp teeth like a dog? Have they got razor-like talons like an eagle? Have they got a shot of venom to hit your eyes and blind you like some snakes? Are they likely to pounce on you like a Polar Bear? What would happen if you simply 'stood still' instead of running away?

Don't get me wrong here, I'm with the rest of you and have always given heel but can someone tell me (granted, they are massive and intimidating) what exactly they would do to you if you just stood still with a big stick waving in the air?

Never tried it, probably never will, just interested.

 

Interesting question, any volunteers?

 

Average man = 14 stone

Average cow = 30 stone + (at say 15mph)

 

I am sure there is a well known mathematical equation for this one!

 

I have never heard of a farmer been biten by his cow but they do kick if you get behind them and farmers have been known to be crushed between two cows or a cow and a wall.

When I helped milk cows I was always warned never to get stuck in the herd or between the cows, always watch out for they kick and if the tail goes up move quickly out of the way. I was never told, watch they may bite and have your hand off but you never know.

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Don't get me wrong here, we have had our (VERY FAIR) amount of run-ins with cows and had similar or worse experiences as those above.

Just a thought, I have often wondered, If, when you are being chased by cows, you just stood still in the middle of the field and let them come? What exactly would they do to you? Have they got a mouth full of sharp teeth like a dog? Have they got razor-like talons like an eagle? Have they got a shot of venom to hit your eyes and blind you like some snakes? Are they likely to pounce on you like a Polar Bear? What would happen if you simply 'stood still' instead of running away?

Don't get me wrong here, I'm with the rest of you and have always given heel but can someone tell me (granted, they are massive and intimidating) what exactly they would do to you if you just stood still with a big stick waving in the air?

Never tried it, probably never will, just interested.

 

Interesting question, any volunteers?

 

Average man = 14 stone

Average cow = 30 stone + (at say 15mph)

 

I am sure there is a well known mathematical equation for this one!

 

If average man at say 16mph, then no problem.

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Don't get me wrong here, we have had our (VERY FAIR) amount of run-ins with cows and had similar or worse experiences as those above.

Just a thought, I have often wondered, If, when you are being chased by cows, you just stood still in the middle of the field and let them come? What exactly would they do to you? Have they got a mouth full of sharp teeth like a dog? Have they got razor-like talons like an eagle? Have they got a shot of venom to hit your eyes and blind you like some snakes? Are they likely to pounce on you like a Polar Bear? What would happen if you simply 'stood still' instead of running away?

Don't get me wrong here, I'm with the rest of you and have always given heel but can someone tell me (granted, they are massive and intimidating) what exactly they would do to you if you just stood still with a big stick waving in the air?

Never tried it, probably never will, just interested.

 

Interesting question, any volunteers?

 

Average man = 14 stone

Average cow = 30 stone + (at say 15mph)

 

I am sure there is a well known mathematical equation for this one!

 

If average man at say 16mph, then no problem.

That sounds like a man & bike volunteering to me!

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Don't get me wrong here, we have had our (VERY FAIR) amount of run-ins with cows and had similar or worse experiences as those above.

Just a thought, I have often wondered, If, when you are being chased by cows, you just stood still in the middle of the field and let them come? What exactly would they do to you? Have they got a mouth full of sharp teeth like a dog? Have they got razor-like talons like an eagle? Have they got a shot of venom to hit your eyes and blind you like some snakes? Are they likely to pounce on you like a Polar Bear? What would happen if you simply 'stood still' instead of running away?

Don't get me wrong here, I'm with the rest of you and have always given heel but can someone tell me (granted, they are massive and intimidating) what exactly they would do to you if you just stood still with a big stick waving in the air?

Never tried it, probably never will, just interested.

 

Interesting question, any volunteers?

 

Average man = 14 stone

Average cow = 30 stone + (at say 15mph)

 

I am sure there is a well known mathematical equation for this one!

 

If average man at say 16mph, then no problem.

That sounds like a man & bike volunteering to me!

 

I already did this. On a bike, I can outpace a herd of cows, even when I go round the outside of the field and they cut across the middle.

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Don't get me wrong here, we have had our (VERY FAIR) amount of run-ins with cows and had similar or worse experiences as those above.

Just a thought, I have often wondered, If, when you are being chased by cows, you just stood still in the middle of the field and let them come? What exactly would they do to you? Have they got a mouth full of sharp teeth like a dog? Have they got razor-like talons like an eagle? Have they got a shot of venom to hit your eyes and blind you like some snakes? Are they likely to pounce on you like a Polar Bear? What would happen if you simply 'stood still' instead of running away?

Don't get me wrong here, I'm with the rest of you and have always given heel but can someone tell me (granted, they are massive and intimidating) what exactly they would do to you if you just stood still with a big stick waving in the air?

Never tried it, probably never will, just interested.

 

Interesting question, any volunteers?

 

Average man = 14 stone

Average cow = 30 stone + (at say 15mph)

 

I am sure there is a well known mathematical equation for this one!

 

If average man at say 16mph, then no problem.

That sounds like a man & bike volunteering to me!

 

I already did this. On a bike, I can outpace a herd of cows, even when I go round the outside of the field and they cut across the middle.

 

But only if you remember to put your wheel on the right way round!!

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Don't get me wrong here, we have had our (VERY FAIR) amount of run-ins with cows and had similar or worse experiences as those above.

Just a thought, I have often wondered, If, when you are being chased by cows, you just stood still in the middle of the field and let them come? What exactly would they do to you? Have they got a mouth full of sharp teeth like a dog? Have they got razor-like talons like an eagle? Have they got a shot of venom to hit your eyes and blind you like some snakes? Are they likely to pounce on you like a Polar Bear? What would happen if you simply 'stood still' instead of running away?

Don't get me wrong here, I'm with the rest of you and have always given heel but can someone tell me (granted, they are massive and intimidating) what exactly they would do to you if you just stood still with a big stick waving in the air?

Never tried it, probably never will, just interested.

 

I'll give it a try this weekend and report back on Monday. If, by chance, I don't post an answer by Monday evening... then I'm afraid you'll have to come to your own conclussion and find another mug...Erm I mean 'VOLUNTEER'.

But seriously, I tend to go with gut feeling as far as livestock is concerned, body language etc...but stay close to the fence / hedge and be ready to take evasive action. Its even crossed my mind whether cattle would actually stop at such a barrier...or just plough straight through.

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I have to say that even though there are some serious points discussed in the thread (and that people have bruised & cracked ribs and ruined brogues), the whole series of messages have made me and the boys laugh out loud.

 

Sorry to laugh at others misfortunes but it's bookmarked now for a rainy, cheerless day in the future.

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I have to say that even though there are some serious points discussed in the thread (and that people have bruised & cracked ribs and ruined brogues), the whole series of messages have made me and the boys laugh out loud.

 

Sorry to laugh at others misfortunes but it's bookmarked now for a rainy, cheerless day in the future.

Well if I am ever flat on my back with my stick lying on the ground above my head, being trampled and dribbled on by cows, I will aim to pull through well enough to post here about it on a cheerless day so you might laugh about it a cheerless day of yours.

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I've luckily not been hurt(yet!), but I am nervous about cattle after one scary experience, excerpt from my log is below.

 

"Now usually I've not had trouble with cows (or were they bullocks?), but as I was walking down the path, this group started running at me. I don't have a lot of experience with cows, but I waved my arms (and my walking stick), and shouted at them to go back. It stopped them a few feet from me, but they would not let me be; and if I tried to turn my back they would start running (and sort of jumping - really!) again. So I had to walk backwards, all the while banging my stick on the ground and shouting. Unfortunatly I banged too hard and broke my stick! But still with half a stick I kept them at bay. Eventually they had enough, and stopped following me; I said good bye and continued along, very happy to cross a stile and exit the field! "

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I've luckily not been hurt(yet!), but I am nervous about cattle after one scary experience, excerpt from my log is below.

 

"Now usually I've not had trouble with cows (or were they bullocks?), but as I was walking down the path, this group started running at me. I don't have a lot of experience with cows, but I waved my arms (and my walking stick), and shouted at them to go back. It stopped them a few feet from me, but they would not let me be; and if I tried to turn my back they would start running (and sort of jumping - really!) again. So I had to walk backwards, all the while banging my stick on the ground and shouting. Unfortunatly I banged too hard and broke my stick! But still with half a stick I kept them at bay. Eventually they had enough, and stopped following me; I said good bye and continued along, very happy to cross a stile and exit the field! "

 

can i just say, if its a public footpath you are not allowed bullocks on the field if that field is open to bullocks crossing your path, if you do find this has happened a) contact the farmer and remind them its a public right of way even if it is their field, B) contact the council or countryside dept whatever is needed to let them know this has happened.

 

cows dont normally come within arms length of you if there is no fence between you, if you had walked towards them theyd have backed off, good idea walking backwards mind.

 

after my uncle having a near death experience (and he worked with livestock for a few years) landed on him after cows and a bull charged last year, had brain surgery and well il not put you off ya suppers but he is lucky to be alive and looking not much different to that he did before the accident but i dont think my aunt will be letting him drive the wagons again anytime soon, but i still love cows :)

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can i just say, if its a public footpath you are not allowed bullocks on the field if that field is open to bullocks crossing your path, if you do find this has happened a) contact the farmer and remind them its a public right of way even if it is their field, B) contact the council or countryside dept whatever is needed to let them know this has happened.

 

 

Not quite true, I'm afraid.... the quote below is

taken from this Goverment Health and Safety publication.

 

"Section 59 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act ■■1981 bans bulls of recognised dairy breeds (eg Ayrshire, Friesian, Holstein, Dairy Shorthorn, Guernsey, Jersey and Kerry) in all circumstances from being at large in fields crossed by public rights of way. Bulls of all other breeds are also banned from such fields unless accompanied by cows or heifers, but there are no specific prohibitions on other cattle. "

 

Edited by Pharisee
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Until one fateful day on Hawks Tor Bodmin, when walking back past a herd of cows along a public footpath one decided to charge and they all followed suit.

 

I'm glad I didn't read this resurrected thread a week ago (before holidaying in Launceston), I was up on Hawks Tor and had to walk through a field of cows with calves, who were all giving me the evil eye! I might have had to walk round if I'd read this in case the Cows this year were last years calves and they had developed a taste for Geocachers!

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There are restrictions on bulls (though young ones under 10 months are allowed)... but I do not believe there is any restriction on bullocks.

 

Reference Ramblers

 

As for the group which were aggressive with me - I'm not sure how old they were, or if they had some of their bits removed. I just know they were male and scary.

 

But touch wood, lately I've had better luck. Yesterday was in a field with 3 young bulls/bullocks. They gave me "the eye" and started making noises, but I kept walking and the ran away from me.

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This is on a regular walk of mine; we were face-to-face (I'm not far off 6ft tall). The cows have occupied the footpath. I had two dogs with me that day, one of which is cow-phobic. It was either go through the cows, or do a two-mile detour (along a road with no pavement) around them. I tied the dogs to a fence post further back and shoo-ed the cows up the hill and we then scuttled across the field before they wended their way back down again.

 

If you do the Haileybury or Hoddesdon Park Woods series (Herts) you might meet these ladies. Sometimes their husband is with them but he's pretty slow and ponderous (I hope).

 

250509014.jpg

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ah cows, came across a heard on a narrow path whilst checking my caches had the dog with me. picked up a stick for a bit of extra reach if needed, and walked in to the field ,dog off lead, straight at the cows harshly shouting "Move it!" 5 minutes and one bull later, and they had eventually cleared the path.

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