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hi

I have been a running a thread about negative comments on newbie cache logs and this came up so I would love to hear your ideas on what makes a good cache as this could be useful to newbie cachers

here is my ideas

good size containers on trad caches

interesting places or walks that are in lovely areas that are missed generally by the public

micros are ok on multi or series caches as long as the end cache is a good size container

challenging hides, not just a 2 second hint

ok over to you

karl (penwith pirates)

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Definitely use the biggest box possible for the location.

Use a waterproof, camouflaged box, do not shove it in a carrier bag/bin sack.

If it's a series, try to vary the hides so they're not all under a pile of sticks in tree roots or at the base of a post. A mix of difficulty is good too.

I agree that a hint should be a hint, not a flashing beacon - unless it's a high muggle area where rummaging for hours would look suspicious.

Try to look at the location with fresh eyes - don't put a cache just so there's a cache there.

Edited by HouseOfDragons
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Well I like a variety but generally:

Location, location, location - somewhere beautiful, unique, interesting, fun, a spot which I wouldn't find without the cache.

Quality hide - well thought out, clever, fun, subtle spot. A place/method that's been thought about, will make it easy to re-hide, looks like it might actually last and not get muggled, doesn't make me feel like I'm a terrorist suspect when finding it.

Quality container - L&Ls are fine, ammo boxes great, custom adapted containers great, good camouflage fun. Tic Tac boxes duff, 35mm cans often poor unless in sheltered location, Chinese take-away containers really poor. Good quality micros are fine and expand the locations that can have a cache. Size doesn't matter, if it's a 'good cache'.

Good clue - ideally, one that isn't entirely obvious, makes you think for a minute and look around, then the penny drops and there's an Ah! moment as it makes sense. If it's a tricky location (scree slope, endless fences or bushes or something) a clue that narrows it down as a GPS only gets you so far. I don't enjoy scrotting about in the grunge over a wide area thanks.

Good cache page - one that has some interesting info about the site and why I'd like to visit. Don't need endless repeats of pages of the same info if it's a series. Parking co-ordinates, unless it's obvious. If you're travelling in a new area, finding where to park or start the hunt can be very tricky. Don't write a cache page just for the locals who 'know everything', remember visitors.

 

Personally, not really bothered about swaps anymore, but appreciate seeing good ones. Don't care about size of container if it's a good cache. Variety is good, so now and again, tricky puzzles, hard finds, middle of public spaces in full view, can all be fun but I don't want to do these all the time. I generally want to find the cache rather than not. DNFs can be sporting, but for me I prefer to find it than not.

 

That's how I see it, I think. :);)

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"Definitely use the biggest box possible for the location."

 

Umm. Nope. In my area, the places I like for caches only a few people are picturesque. I even have one you can litraly lean out of the car window (4x4) to get, but because it looks like you have to walk to it it gets very little trafic.

 

I have another with a 0.75l container on top of a mountain with enough room for logbook and some GC/TB. and very little else. In this location you could hide 3 ammo boxes but as there is so little traffic its not worth putting kiddies toys in the cache where children will never go. Its not only my caches, it seems most of the local cachers have the same problems more or less - Hills.

 

Unless they are cache and dash most are low traffic caches.

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"Definitely use the biggest box possible for the location."

 

Umm. Nope.

 

 

I guess what I meant was the most appropriate box for the location - eg I can't see a nano in a forest ever being appropriate but sometimes, in a clever hide, a smaller box is needed when you could have hidden an ammo box under a fallen tree or, as you say, where a big box is unnecessary.

Edited by HouseOfDragons
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We all want different things from caching but I think it's all about 'interest'. The location, the history, the view, the hide itself, the container, - one or more of them must make the finder think, "Hey, that's good".

You're right. Perhaps it's simply one of an interesting series, or it's not in a very nice place but it's the first one ever placed in the county, or perhaps it's the highest or lowest or smallest or most difficult in the area (etc. etc.). Perhaps it's just really easy and convenient; a car park micro can be a good cache. People go out of their way to log such caches even though they know not to expect a great location or anything educational.

 

All these examples would be "good" in at least one way (even if not in any other way).

 

What I'm saying is that it's impossible to cater for all tastes in one cache, so just make sure it has some point - even though that might not be what everyone agrees to be the most significant. As long as it has at least one worthwhile feature to boast, it's a good cache; and there's no need to worry about flak from people who don't happen to like that type of hide.

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Well I like a variety but generally...

I'd second nearly all of that. Though for family cachers, a good supply of swaps is always a bonus - they don't need to be expensive. Seriously - McD's toys or even knackered old matchbox cars seem to please our mini cachers. But a box full of cacher's calling cards & soggy polos never goes down well. But The cache owner can't do a lot about that.

 

The problem we have is the oldest of the mini cachers has a photographic memory when it comes to tat we've got out of a cache, and won't let us put anything in if she got it out of a cache any time in the last 3 years! Can't remember where she put her shoes 5 minutes ago, or that she's gone to her bedroom to get ready for bed of course. :D

 

But listen to Martlakes - We are truly spoilt in this area with his caches - all really well-thought out, lots of info and brilliant locations. He's managed to get a proper-sized box right on the busiest corner in Kendal. Check out his latest Kendal cache - I've not got all the info yet, but i know it'll be a great hide. I think there has to be a challenge in that cache - have a drink in all the (open) establishments en-route to the final... :P

 

I think it has a knock-on effect on the rest of us, as we tend to think of it as the norm. Its frustrating in other parts of the country to find film canisters just dumped in any old hedge with absolutely no redeeming features.

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...make sure it has some point...

 

I'll echo that. My suggestion is always to take a step back and ask yourself Why? - "Why would I want someone to visit this location?", "What's the point of bringing them here?". If the answer is only to add another ivy-covered micro to their numbers - then perhaps you should reconsider. But as others have pointed out, there are a whole variety of more acceptable answers. :D

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We've got a magnetic nano on a pair massive of grain silos and everyone seems to like it...

 

dc66c740-aa5e-4f8e-891f-1708d7fc20e1.jpg

 

Mind you, the hint is VERY precise otherwise it would just be an absolutely pointless irritation :laughing:

 

Mark

 

A microwave irritation by the looks of it! Did you get Health and Safety approval for that one? :D:P

Edited by Lost in Space
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A little thought is all it takes to set a great cache.

 

We believe that every cache should have a reason for being set and that needs to be carefully brought out in the description. Is the site a great place to visit, is it a place for a picnic, is it an athletic challenge, a puzzle and so on. The cache must also be consistent and sympathetic to the site. If it is a great place to visit then a hard to find micro is not appropriate. Those set to attract baggers to a location should not be so difficult that families spend all their time hunting the impossible leading to the frustrations that a DNF creates and causing baggers to miss the enjoyment that the site offers. There are plenty of none descript location for this type of cache. Moreover hard to find caches should not be set where muggles will create difficulties for the bagger, such as public monuments. One cache I visited recently was set across the road from a pub garden, over a grass verge and behind a hydrant on a wall. It was totally impossible to bag discreetly during opening times and the write up did not make this clear.

 

Also think strategically. Does your area have a spread of all the cache types? If not set one to plug the gap. Variety and choice adds interest. Generally, there is a shortage of caches with a total of seven points and in the same way that everyone rejoices when they reach a thousand finds so every serious Geocacher should feel incomplete without having bagged a five for difficulty. However, avoid caches of over seven points. A five for difficulty will normally involve a bagger in several DNFs before achieving the bag and baggers should not need to make elaborate preparations to cross challenging terrain for a probable DNF. Setting a five for difficulty takes a lot of planning. It has to be a challenge not a chore. A nano in a haystack is a poor five. Of the ones we set my favourite challenge involves a full size cache along a set bearing of a given short distance (just over a hundred yards) from the coordinates and getting from the coordinates to the cache is a straight forward walk. The cache’s hiding place is obvious from about two yards away and only needs a misplaced stone to be moved for the container to be easily retrieved. Why then has it not yet been bagged? This one, I argue, is a challenge and not a chore.

 

If you are considering setting a micro, think and then think again, why? The current number of Micros mars Geocaching and they should only be set for a specific reason. It is extremely rare that without a bit of imagination a proper cache cannot be set. Let us justify why we believe micros are to the detriment of Geocaching. They are not a suitable repository for TBs and the like (we are disappointed how difficult it can be in some areas to find a cache in which to deposit a TB) and they take the challenge away from using a GPS to hunt down a cache to one where the emphasis is on the hunt after you have arrived at the site and the GPS phase is over. Remember that micros carry equal value to proper caches and may prevent a proper cache being set in a place that justifies one. For example around and about someone has done commendable work in providing a walk around two villages following caches but they have used only micros. Practically all of the caches could have been proper ones and the situation has arisen that these villages cannot now receive TBs and we cannot mark sites in the two villages with caches because of the minimum separation rule.

 

If you are setting a cache for beginners or as an introduction to Geocaching then a micro is inappropriate.

 

And remember that when you set a micro, a lot of the surrounding area will be disturbed with baggers trying to find it. How many walls in Britain are suffering unnaturally high rates of decay because of well-hidden, poorly-considered micros.

 

Seek permission where viable. You will be surprised at how many people will allow a cache and permission allows you be to be much more creative in your set.

 

Think about all the seasons. It is surprising how many caches set in the winter end up covered in undergrowth in the summer. Similarly, I have bagged a cache without a GPS or description simply by stumbling on that characteristic, illogical trail of downtrodden grass.

 

Check your co-ordinates and written description carefully. How you thought you set a cache may not be how it is perceived to a bagger. A DNF because of incorrect co-ordinates or poor description is a severe black mark against the setter.

 

If you do not set your cache as a challenge, then look into every DNF in some detail and make sure that the problem is not of your making or through lack of maintenance. Note that for each recorded DNF many more will have gone unlogged.

 

Think about your Hint. If you intend to your cache to be found easily then ensure that the Hint prevents a DNF. If set as a puzzle then the Hint should be such to knock down the difficulty rating by one or two points.

 

Finally reread your description. Are you certain that the bagger, when they set out to bag your cache, knows exactly what to expect? Noone, and families in particular, should have to abandon a hunt because they ran into a situation they were not expecting.

 

It does not take a great deal of thought to set a great cache and always remember that when you plan one, the quality of the sport is in your hands.

 

M of M&Ms

Edited by M&Ms
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A lot of good advice there, although I disagree about micros not being "proper" caches and I think that your "micro" section is based on your personal preference rather than being about "quality". You have to bear in mind that if it doesn't fit with your personal preference it's not necessarily a bad cache.

 

Personally, if it's an interesting walk around a village I'd prefer a set of microcaches, although I agree that one cache in the immediate area should be big enough for travelling items. I tend to prefer a well-executed micro to an average full-size cache, although I appreciate that it takes more effort to hide a micro than a larger box, so if the effort isn't made the cache could easily be a poor quality one.

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To be clear. We enjoy micro caches where the situation is appropriate but we believe there are a disproportionately high number of them particularly when a normal sized cache could be set. A large number of micros are in hiding places that could just as easily accommodate a normal sized container. We believe that too often people set a micro to avoid the phaff of a normal sized cache. Other than when the intent is to make the bagger scramble through ivy, check under every stone then a micro cache site should be fairly obvious. The enjoyment in Geocaching should be using the GPS and not primarily in a protracted final hunt. It is easy to set a cache where the using a GPS intelligently provides the challenge and in the UK such caches are rare. In the villages to which we refer, the walk is grand and well laid out but both villages have interesting historical sites not covered by the caches and there is nothing that can be done to bring them to the baggers attention.

 

M of M&Ms

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... In the villages to which we refer, the walk is grand and well laid out but both villages have interesting historical sites not covered by the caches and there is nothing that can be done to bring them to the baggers attention.

 

M of M&Ms

 

That's a bit disappointing. Do you mean "nothing can be done" because there are micros near to these historic points of interest, but they make no mention of them in their cache description? Are they too close to these sites that you are unable to put another cache of your own there?

 

If so, I wonder whether the micro owner would be up for a bit of "caching co-operation"? Perhaps they'd consider adding a bit of extra information to the cache page, to high-light the nearby features? Maybe... just maybe... they might even replace one of the micros with a small box... with a bit of tactful persuasion? :blink:

 

MrsB

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"Definitely use the biggest box possible for the location."

 

I have another with a 0.75l container on top of a mountain with enough room for logbook and some GC/TB. and very little else. In this location you could hide 3 ammo boxes but as there is so little traffic its not worth putting kiddies toys in the cache where children will never go. Its not only my caches, it seems most of the local cachers have the same problems more or less - Hills.

 

Unless they are cache and dash most are low traffic caches.

 

Surely this makes the cache even less attractive and discourages visitors.

 

It would certainly discourage me despite the good walk and view, my kids would complain especially if there is room as you say to place several large boxes.

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... In the villages to which we refer, the walk is grand and well laid out but both villages have interesting historical sites not covered by the caches and there is nothing that can be done to bring them to the baggers attention.

 

M of M&Ms

 

That's a bit disappointing. Do you mean "nothing can be done" because there are micros near to these historic points of interest, but they make no mention of them in their cache description? Are they too close to these sites that you are unable to put another cache of your own there?

 

If so, I wonder whether the micro owner would be up for a bit of "caching co-operation"? Perhaps they'd consider adding a bit of extra information to the cache page, to high-light the nearby features? Maybe... just maybe... they might even replace one of the micros with a small box... with a bit of tactful persuasion? :blink:

 

MrsB

Of course, I exaggerate. Something is being done. Perchance I befriended the landowner of one of the sites in the local pub who is upset about a cache on his site causing baggers to poke about inside antiques. (I am deliberately avoiding causing embarrassment to the cache owners by identifying the caches.) He is however more than happy for a permanent cache close to the antiques. (This type of cooperation is not unusual when you seek permission). Similarly, the farmer who owns the land on which is located one of the caches has put a bull in the field containing the cache. Though he would rather not have a cache on his land he is prepared to agree to one provided he is involved in deciding its location. However, before approaching the caches’ owner and I would like to see whether it is possible to relocate the caches so that the owner can place one in at least one of the villages …and just to maintain the thread of this discussion; this demonstrates the importance of planning before deciding on a cache site including the strategic perspective.

 

I also intend to set a cache to convince Happy Humphrey that a well planned and prepared normal sized cache will provide greater pleasure than the best micro. To do so I must combine a great location with the need to use intelligently a GPS, to follow the guidance in the description carefully and rounded off with a superbly conceived hide. The difference between the normal and micro cache is solely in the final location and I intend to exploit the inherent advantage of the normal sized cache site by avoiding the possibility of a protracted search after the bagger has successfully navigated to the final location. I will meet the criteria that whoever embarks on bagging any of my caches will leave thinking they have had fun regardless of the outcome.

 

M of M&Ms

Edited by M&Ms
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Perchance I befriended the landowner of one of the sites in the local pub who is upset about a cache on his site causing baggers to poke about inside antiques. (I am deliberately avoiding causing embarrassment to the cache owners by identifying the caches.) He is however more than happy for a permanent cache close to the antiques...

 

M of M&Ms

 

All geocaches listed on GC.com should comply with this guideline: "Caches may be quickly archived if we see the following (which is not exhaustive): Caches placed in areas which are highly sensitive to the extra traffic that would be caused by vehicles and humans (examples may include archaeological or historic sites)."

 

Also, within UK, cache owners are requested to follow this GAGB Guideline: "No cache should be placed in such a way as to risk damage or disturbance to any Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) or Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM)."

 

If you are aware of a cache where damage is being caused, due to its location too close to some antiquity then please contact your local reviewer about it. From your description above, this sounds like a cache that should be removed and/or re-sited elsewhere.

 

MrsB

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Is 'bagger' now the new term for cacher or finder? :blink::mad:B):grin:

 

A colloquialism imported from elsewhere in the Globe. Feel free to use it if your wish. Another is CEGA (pronounced seegar) – Collateral Evidence of Geocaching Activity, which is the visible disturbance of a site by previous baggers that provides a clue that you are near the cache.

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Is 'bagger' now the new term for cacher or finder? :wub::P:)B)

 

A colloquialism imported from elsewhere in the Globe. Feel free to use it if your wish. Another is CEGA (pronounced seegar) – Collateral Evidence of Geocaching Activity, which is the visible disturbance of a site by previous baggers that provides a clue that you are near the cache.

In the UK you can bag a hill, a trig point or even a benchmark, but not a Geocache. ;)

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Surely this makes the cache even less attractive and discourages visitors.

 

It would certainly discourage me despite the good walk and view, my kids would complain especially if there is room as you say to place several large boxes.

 

Personally, I don't think so. But my next cache will be a bigger container with lots of swaps in an easy flat location (wheelchair accessible) except the last 25ft, in a picturesque setting; I can guarantee this will have lots more traffic. Not because of the toys but due to the less effort required to get to it.

Edited by Djinnsplace
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Well I like a variety but generally...

I'd second nearly all of that. Though for family cachers, a good supply of swaps is always a bonus - they don't need to be expensive. Seriously - McD's toys or even knackered old matchbox cars seem to please our mini cachers. But a box full of cacher's calling cards & soggy polos never goes down well. But The cache owner can't do a lot about that.

 

The problem we have is the oldest of the mini cachers has a photographic memory when it comes to tat we've got out of a cache, and won't let us put anything in if she got it out of a cache any time in the last 3 years! Can't remember where she put her shoes 5 minutes ago, or that she's gone to her bedroom to get ready for bed of course. :wub:

 

But listen to Martlakes - We are truly spoilt in this area with his caches - all really well-thought out, lots of info and brilliant locations. He's managed to get a proper-sized box right on the busiest corner in Kendal. Check out his latest Kendal cache - I've not got all the info yet, but i know it'll be a great hide. I think there has to be a challenge in that cache - have a drink in all the (open) establishments en-route to the final... ;)

 

I think it has a knock-on effect on the rest of us, as we tend to think of it as the norm. Its frustrating in other parts of the country to find film canisters just dumped in any old hedge with absolutely no redeeming features.

 

We cache in 2 main areas - Lakes & Yorkshire/Lancs

Lakes have many fine cachers, past & present and their reputation goes before them, so you're virtually guaranteed a well thought out cache.

But whilst there is a much higher density of caches in Yorks / Lancs, there are far fewer quality cache setters.

 

Interesting comment about the knock on effect. In Colne Valley where we live, I can't think of one poor cache as every local cacher feels they should maintain the standards.

(I'd pinch the caches if they didn't :P )

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All geocaches listed on GC.com should comply with this guideline: "Caches may be quickly archived if we see the following (which is not exhaustive): Caches placed in areas which are highly sensitive to the extra traffic that would be caused by vehicles and humans (examples may include archaeological or historic sites)."

 

Also, within UK, cache owners are requested to follow this GAGB Guideline: "No cache should be placed in such a way as to risk damage or disturbance to any Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) or Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM)."

 

If you are aware of a cache where damage is being caused, due to its location too close to some antiquity then please contact your local reviewer about it. From your description above, this sounds like a cache that should be removed and/or re-sited elsewhere.

 

MrsB

 

Excellent advice :)

 

You'll be surprised what you can achieve with discussion with land managers. I have made an agreement with one Wildlife trust already that has worked very well and they are willing to act as a reference for any other trust. So it is possible to place caches on sensitive land.

But I doubt they would be happy for a micro, they want to make sure people visit and enjoy their sites but without incurring too much associated damage. A cache that is too small without a very specific clue tends to get lots of damage from people struggle to find it. The smaller the cache the larger that damage.

 

Smaller caches do have their place. So tempting to say the bin LOL :D As others have said it is the large amount of dross that tars the good micro caches because there is no way to know which is which. I've just changed my PQ's so that i no longer have any listed and i know that I will be eliminating many great caches but what can I do?

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The quality of new caches is a subject close to my heart, too.

 

I have read, with interest, what others think makes a good cache and it just goes to show that we are all different.

 

When we set our first cache I can remember reading in the guidance notes something along the lines of " Dont just set a cache in a spot 'because you can'. You are recommending this place for others to come and visit and above all , enjoy." I have tried to find the passage recently to quote to someone but unfortunately it seems to have been removed.

 

I believe that one of the problems today, is that newcomers are allowed to set caches before they have found sufficient themselves to understand what makes a good cache and indeed the responsibilities they are undertaking for maintaining them. We recently had a cache down here in the southwest set by someone who had not found a single cache. Noone could find it and it has now been archived by Graculus.

 

Whether a cache setter is a new cacher or not, unless visitors to the cache are prepared to be truthful in recording their thoughts in the log, the setter is not going to know what others think.........................or we can just bury our head in the sand and opt for the inane " Easy find. TNLN Thanks" and watch as the number of substandard caches dilutes the enjoyment that we once got from this hobby. Anyone can throw a 35mm container under a gorse bush in a layby, unfortunately too many now do.

 

OK, I've had my moan. Back to you.

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We feel that the most important quality of a cache is the feelgood factor level that can be induced by the find.

If a search involves too much stealth and personal embarassment then this factor is greatly reduced.

Being furtive and trying to avoid the gaze of muggles becomes all too much like actions we commonly read about in spy thrillers. As geocachers, we do not see any point or enjoyment in this sort of activity.

Cache owners should be bringing the hunters to new, different and exciting environments that have a local history or a natural beauty. If these sites involve a good walk or hike, then to us, it becomes even more enjoyable than the 'cache and dash' scenarios that are becoming all too common.

The size of the cache container is obviously limited by the dimensions of the selected concealment area but it is preferable to have a container that is big enough to contain coins and TBs.

Lastly, the provision of a good but subtle hint is essential, as this will also add to the memorable experience of a successful find.

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Personally, I don't think so. But my next cache will be a bigger container with lots of swaps in an easy flat location (wheelchair accessible) except the last 25ft, in a picturesque setting; I can guarantee this will have lots more traffic. Not because of the toys but due to the less effort required to get to it.

 

Ho Hum - just to prove what I said was true - GC1VA9X

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All geocaches listed on GC.com should comply with this guideline: "Caches may be quickly archived if we see the following (which is not exhaustive): Caches placed in areas which are highly sensitive to the extra traffic that would be caused by vehicles and humans (examples may include archaeological or historic sites)."

 

Also, within UK, cache owners are requested to follow this GAGB Guideline: "No cache should be placed in such a way as to risk damage or disturbance to any Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) or Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM)."

 

If you are aware of a cache where damage is being caused, due to its location too close to some antiquity then please contact your local reviewer about it. From your description above, this sounds like a cache that should be removed and/or re-sited elsewhere.

 

MrsB

 

Excellent advice :lol:

 

You'll be surprised what you can achieve with discussion with land managers. I have made an agreement with one Wildlife trust already that has worked very well and they are willing to act as a reference for any other trust. So it is possible to place caches on sensitive land.

But I doubt they would be happy for a micro, they want to make sure people visit and enjoy their sites but without incurring too much associated damage. A cache that is too small without a very specific clue tends to get lots of damage from people struggle to find it. The smaller the cache the larger that damage.

 

Smaller caches do have their place. So tempting to say the bin LOL :P As others have said it is the large amount of dross that tars the good micro caches because there is no way to know which is which. I've just changed my PQ's so that i no longer have any listed and i know that I will be eliminating many great caches but what can I do?

Try reading the logs by previous cachers to see if they are worth doing! :ph34r:

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All geocaches listed on GC.com should comply with this guideline: "Caches may be quickly archived if we see the following (which is not exhaustive): Caches placed in areas which are highly sensitive to the extra traffic that would be caused by vehicles and humans (examples may include archaeological or historic sites)."

 

Also, within UK, cache owners are requested to follow this GAGB Guideline: "No cache should be placed in such a way as to risk damage or disturbance to any Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) or Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM)."

 

If you are aware of a cache where damage is being caused, due to its location too close to some antiquity then please contact your local reviewer about it. From your description above, this sounds like a cache that should be removed and/or re-sited elsewhere.

 

MrsB

 

Excellent advice :lol:

 

You'll be surprised what you can achieve with discussion with land managers. I have made an agreement with one Wildlife trust already that has worked very well and they are willing to act as a reference for any other trust. So it is possible to place caches on sensitive land.

But I doubt they would be happy for a micro, they want to make sure people visit and enjoy their sites but without incurring too much associated damage. A cache that is too small without a very specific clue tends to get lots of damage from people struggle to find it. The smaller the cache the larger that damage.

 

Smaller caches do have their place. So tempting to say the bin LOL :P As others have said it is the large amount of dross that tars the good micro caches because there is no way to know which is which. I've just changed my PQ's so that i no longer have any listed and i know that I will be eliminating many great caches but what can I do?

Try reading the logs by previous cachers to see if they are worth doing! :ph34r:

 

alternatively, plot the coords on a good map (Memory Map or Google earth) to get a feel of the general location...

 

You might then be able to eliminate micros in the countryside, where a larger cache might be more appropriate. I agree these seem to be proliferating, especially on some of the longer circular walks, and I suspect it is because they are easier and cheaper to place. Personally, I like the walks so I put up with the micros, but I can totally see how others might get annoyed!

 

By eliminating the countryside micros, you probably have a statistically better chance that micros you do find are more worthwhile. Obviously, you may still miss some good micros, but word of mouth in the local area might highlight them!

 

Just a thought!

 

Dave

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I've read through this forum I certainly agree with many of the good points raised by the cachers!

 

I have got back into Geocaching of late, and have 46 finds in the last 3 weeks. I have found (and am planning to search for) caches across the whole spectrum that is out there to find, from micros to large cache containers, from caching in busy environments to caching 'in the middle of nowhere'.

 

However, I was very disappointed with a cache I found today! The cache was very close to a place I visit every month, and today I had a few minutes spare and decided to have a look! I knew I was looking for a micro, however was disappointed that it was in a location that was certainly capable of housing a much larger cache container (definately not in the same location but certainly within 10 metres!).

 

Added to that, the cache container (a tiny plastic tube) was just poked in the end of what looked like half a mallet head and it stood out a mile, allowing me to notice it without really having to look for it! When I put it back I thought it'd be best to try and cover it a bit more with some loose leaves just so muggles don't notice it!

 

Not too sure why setters place smaller caches when there is a chance to place a larger container in the same vacinity! I know there are reasons why some setters place a number of micros around an area (in a series etc) and that I can accept, however placing a micro just for the sake of setting a cache kind of wastes that area's potential (and the potential of the area close to the cache) to house bigger/better/more original caches!

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I'm a complete newby at Geaocaching (started on the weekend and we found 4 didn't find 2), but as a newly starting out family with 3 young children I think it would be handy that if you set a micro somwhere, that the hint is very specific.

 

I found this hobby just last week, and thought it would be a fabulous way to enthuse my children (aged 6, 3 and just 5 months) a bit more when we're spending time outdoors walking, exploring, and taking road trips. However, I think the novelty will soon wear off if they are continually disapointed about not being able to find the cache.

Edited by themitchell5
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To me one big aspect is whether the area is a nice place to visit. If it's a nice place to visit and I can't find the cache I've still had a good time going to the area. If it's an area I've been to 1000 times already and can't find the cache, if it was nice enough to visit 1000 times it's nice enough to visit 1001 times. Don't hide something under a pile of garbage in a dingy car park (I have seen it done, and had I not been wearing my oldest caching clothes I'd have left it and put the cache on my ignore list)

 

For me a clever hide makes a cache more enjoyable. It needs to be somewhere that might not be immediately obvious, and it needs to be somewhere that can be accessed even if there are a few muggles about. I find magnetic micros on park benches frustrating, simply because in an empty park a single muggle in the wrong place with a book means I can't get the cache.

 

If the cache requires doing something unusual make it clear in the description. If you want to put a cache 20 feet up a tree I have no problem with that at all (not everybody is as vertically inept as I am), but I'd like to know in advance so I know not to start it until I've lost some weight. (A 5/5 rated cache tells me immediately I probably won't get it even if the description doesn't)

 

Personally I like clues that narrow down where the cache is but don't necessarily tell me precisely where it is. But make the clue helpful - one cache I looked for just said it was magnetic and very low - the target area was a metal fence about 200 feet long with brambles and nettles.

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