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what do you use for containers?


Sirrus123
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i'm a newbie teenage geocacher, to young to get a job, with a monthly allowance that gets tied up before i even get it.

so far, i've been using Crystal Light containers that i break the seal on before my parents start into them, take out the tubs, rip off the label, write the disclaimer on the lid, and fill it whit the loot.

but as for micro containers, there really is no common household item you can use.

I thought of taking 3 inch sections of 1.5" PVC, gluing a plug on one end, and just putting the plug on the other, and using that.

However, at 78 cents a pop, end caps are not cheap, parsay, putting each cache at about 2 dollars.

Anyway, it depends on how much you like hiding these things, and i love it. Theres only about 20 caches in my area that are bikeable to, so i enjoy tying up my time with planting my own, making my city a more fun place to cache for everyone else.

It would be pretty cheap compared to the stuff i'm doing now to bulk buy things online, like 12 aluminum canisters, which one every two days, lasts me an entire month for only around 15 dollars.

 

Anyway, are there any cheap caches that you have you want to share?

I'd really appreciate it.

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For a geocache container, particularly in a wet environment, I prefer to use a used quart-size or gallon-size ziplock plastic bag, so long as it does not have too many holes in it. And, for the logbook, I use the back of any handy receipt from a convenience store or from a fast food restaurant. For swag, I will often throw in a few french fries from a fast food restaurant or a broken toy or something that I was able to scrounge from a nearby dumpster.

 

 

 

 

 

 

:P;):o

 

:unsure:

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you can use the plastic juice containes with wide mouth top. Baby food containers if ya got a baby around or in the neighborhood. Mint cans are good for micro's check out the ccc post on here there are a lot of good ideas. Good Luck Usa 45 :unsure:

Who is CCC?

i've heard of him/her, but i don't know the exact name.

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you can use the plastic juice containes with wide mouth top. Baby food containers if ya got a baby around or in the neighborhood. Mint cans are good for micro's check out the ccc post on here there are a lot of good ideas. Good Luck Usa 45 :unsure:

Who is CCC?

i've heard of him/her, but i don't know the exact name.

 

Actually that post was refering to the "Cool Cache Containers" thread, although there is a CCCooper Agency cacher.

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Our local 99cent store has Lock-n-Lock containers. The smallers ones even if you buy them at Target, or Wally are only a couple bucks, and you can cammo them up pretty easily. Some green and tan paint, and some branches, and you're good to go with a nice sealed container. They have some of these that are about 2-1/2 to 3" around that would be small enough for a micro. But some people's ideas of a micro are different than mine.

 

Good Luck..

CacheCammo.jpg

Edited by ohgr
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First, the CCC thread can be found HERE. Get a glass of tea or soda, some snacks, and settle back. You're gonna be there a while! :blink:

 

 

Pill bottles covered in camo tape or painted to blend work well for micros. They are fairly sturdy and seal well.

 

Lock and locks seem to work very well for small caches, as do peanut butter jars and similar. You must be sure to clean any re-used food container well, and leave it air for a week or two before using to allow odors to leave the material.

 

A decent medium container is a plastic coffee can, but you must be sure the cache is not in an exposed area, or a low one as temperature changes are often enough to pop off this type snap on lid.

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I went to walmart and asked them for a bunch of film container. They gave me a big bag full for FREE.

In this area, I have found several where temperature changes have popped the lids off these, and several more the critters have chewed on. Be sure to put those where water will not be a problem.

 

Pill bottles or waterproof match containers seal much better.

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I went to walmart and asked them for a bunch of film container. They gave me a big bag full for FREE.

In this area, I have found several where temperature changes have popped the lids off these, and several more the critters have chewed on. Be sure to put those where water will not be a problem.

 

Pill bottles or waterproof match containers seal much better.

 

Ha, I went to do maintenance on one of mine this weekend, an altoids tin wrapped in camo tape, and something had gotten hold of it and tried to gnaw it open. Probably a racoon, maybe a squirrel. At least whatever it was didn't take off with it.

 

If you get some of the small snack size ziploc bags, you can put a bit of paper in that for a log and it will fit in something small like a film canister, etc to keep the log dry. I have a chapstick tube in black tape that I haven't found the right place for yet, but will sometime.

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If you can get some film canitsters, those would make great micro-caches.
If you like wet logbooks. Haven't found one yet where the logbook was dry.
Perhaps cachers in your area are using the wrong kind. The ones that have a lid which fit over the container tend to not be very water resistant. The ones that have a cap that snaps into the container tend to be more water resistant. Of course, it's best to put the log into a tiny baggy as a bit of ensurance.
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I went to walmart and asked them for a bunch of film container. They gave me a big bag full for FREE.

Micro Spew in Minnesota...Come one and all!!!

 

Anyway, Just kidding...Rochester just went through a Micro-Spew recently...just had to say it :huh:

 

Anywho...

 

Lock n' Lock Containers don't seem to bad...I am trying a couple to see how they last. I have used the matchstick containers and film canisters...gotta go with the mathcstick containers...I have only found one film canister that actually kept moisture out...(I know...weird...one actually worked)...actually the ones mentioned by sbell11 do work well for the most part!!! Just be sure to try them out before placing the hide...some work better than others.

 

Some great small containers are Gatorade and Poweraid powder containers (as long as you get the sweet smell out of them to prevent animals from chewing on them...personally, I have been having luck with setting mothballs in them for a month or two...really makes the container smell bad to animals...and humans!!!).

 

Othwerwise...ammo boxes are always good!!! If you search around you cang et them fairly cheap.

 

I have noticed that I shop for food and goods now by the container it comes in...not always the best deal...

 

Later,

ArcherDragoon

Edited by ArcherDragoon
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Widemouth Nalgene bottles

 

bottles.jpg

...make a great waterproof container but are not cheap. as said by previous posters, waterproof matchstick containers, pill bottles and film cannisters are cheap or free but be sure to put the log in a ziploc baggie.

 

True Nalgene is not cheap, but if you have a BJs Warehouse store near you, they are selling a pack of 4 lexan

widemouth bottles for $7.

 

Also Nalgene Straight Jars run from 50 cents to $2.99 depending on size. Check Campmor online for these.

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If you can get some film canitsters, those would make great micro-caches.
If you like wet logbooks. Haven't found one yet where the logbook was dry.
Perhaps cachers in your area are using the wrong kind. The ones that have a lid which fit over the container tend to not be very water resistant. The ones that have a cap that snaps into the container tend to be more water resistant. Of course, it's best to put the log into a tiny baggy as a bit of ensurance.

 

Unfortunately the Kodak type canisters (black w/grey lid) are far for common than the Fuji canisters everywhere I've been.

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Widemouth Nalgene bottles

 

bottles.jpg

...make a great waterproof container but are not cheap. as said by previous posters, waterproof matchstick containers, pill bottles and film cannisters are cheap or free but be sure to put the log in a ziploc baggie.

 

Not cheap unless you find them at the dollar store. We found a bunch there and while I don't think they were actually nalgene, at least two have surved two full years now without incident and one is exposed to the elements, but remains dry.

 

As for cheap, large containers try out your high school cafeteria kitchen or our local diners. They both get plenty of food products in the those big plastic bins with the screw on lids. Wash thoroughly in warm soapy water and soak overnight with water and a couple tablespoons of bleach to kill any food smells. They're easy to camo and free! :huh:

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The problem with moisture getting into caches has more to do with daily/nightly temperature changes then with getting rained on. A film canister placed with it's top down will attract atmospheric moisture, it runs down and pools around the exposed lip of the lid. When it gets cold at night, the air inside the container contracts and causes a slight vacuum which draws the moisture inside. Upon warming the next day, the air inside expands and a small amount is expelled, setting the scene for a repeat the next night. I'm sure that everyone has had a bottle of sewing machine oil (or similar product) stored in a box for a long time only to find the bottle empty & the contents of the box saturated- same principal at work.

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If you can get some film canitsters, those would make great micro-caches.
If you like wet logbooks. Haven't found one yet where the logbook was dry.
Perhaps cachers in your area are using the wrong kind. The ones that have a lid which fit over the container tend to not be very water resistant. The ones that have a cap that snaps into the container tend to be more water resistant. Of course, it's best to put the log into a tiny baggy as a bit of ensurance.
Unfortunately the Kodak type canisters (black w/grey lid) are far for common than the Fuji canisters everywhere I've been.
The Kodak ones work fine to keep small change or some meds in, but sure 'tis no geocache, English
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Looking through a Lee Valley catalog recently, I noticed these Mini Containers:

 

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=...amp;cat=1,43326

 

They look very similar to the aluminum cylinders sold as geocache containers but at a fraction of the cost, about $1 each. Any experience with them? Probably not as good in some respect as the geocache containers, and the colors offered are not exactly camouflage. But if they are truly waterproof, it seems they would make good containers.

 

I'll probably never hide a micro, so I'll have to let someone else be the judge ...

 

Edward

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Looking through a Lee Valley catalog recently, I noticed these Mini Containers:

 

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=...amp;cat=1,43326

 

They look very similar to the aluminum cylinders sold as geocache containers but at a fraction of the cost, about $1 each. Any experience with them? Probably not as good in some respect as the geocache containers, and the colors offered are not exactly camouflage. But if they are truly waterproof, it seems they would make good containers.

 

I'll probably never hide a micro, so I'll have to let someone else be the judge ...

I've used very similar containers that I purchased from sciplus.com. The worked quite well. The only thing to remember is that the o-ring can take a little damage as the container is screwed tight against it. Luckily, o-rings are very inexpensive. If one is starting to get worn, it can be easily swapped during a maintenance visit.

 

BTW, I was wandering around a Workshop Tools store a while back and noticed a bin of generic bison tubes priced at 99 cents each.

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Looking through a Lee Valley catalog recently, I noticed these Mini Containers:

 

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=...amp;cat=1,43326

 

They look very similar to the aluminum cylinders sold as geocache containers but at a fraction of the cost, about $1 each. Any experience with them? Probably not as good in some respect as the geocache containers, and the colors offered are not exactly camouflage. But if they are truly waterproof, it seems they would make good containers.

 

I'll probably never hide a micro, so I'll have to let someone else be the judge ...

 

Edward

 

I haven't purchased this particular item before, but the ones similar to it can have the color removed by light hand sanding. They will be silver, but can also be easily repainted to whatever works for your needs. The hanging strap would make it nice for winter applications since you could hang them in a tree.

 

By the way, if you choose to use the film canister route, Target seems to get more of the Fuji ones in our area. Anywhere that has a film processing lab will usually give you the containers if you ask. We use them for one of our swag items. We make mini CITO containers that hold a non-latex glove and a trash bag.

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The Dollar Store had regular length, wide army green flashlights a couple of weeks ago. I pulled out the cheap batteries, removed the bulb and reflector and ended up with just a flashlight shell that had an o-ring on the screw top. Put a ziplock bag inside, log (double bagged), shorty pen, TB, geocoin, and a couple of other small items.

 

I'm sure the container is not waterproof to the point of submersible, but it should hold up fairly well in the dry area where it is hidden. The size is great, and the shape makes it easy to slide into lots of good hiding spots. Does anyone who has used this container, or similar flashlight style, have good or bad feedback?

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Widemouth Nalgene bottles

 

bottles.jpg

...make a great waterproof container but are not cheap. as said by previous posters, waterproof matchstick containers, pill bottles and film cannisters are cheap or free but be sure to put the log in a ziploc baggie.

 

Not cheap unless you find them at the dollar store. We found a bunch there and while I don't think they were actually nalgene, at least two have surved two full years now without incident and one is exposed to the elements, but remains dry.

 

As for cheap, large containers try out your high school cafeteria kitchen or our local diners. They both get plenty of food products in the those big plastic bins with the screw on lids. Wash thoroughly in warm soapy water and soak overnight with water and a couple tablespoons of bleach to kill any food smells. They're easy to camo and free! :blink:

 

Found some Nalgene at Target, Eddie Bauer label, still not real cheap but less than the original Nalgene bottles

Edited by private bones
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For a geocache container, particularly in a wet environment, I prefer to use a used quart-size or gallon-size ziplock plastic bag, so long as it does not have too many holes in it. And, for the logbook, I use the back of any handy receipt from a convenience store or from a fast food restaurant. For swag, I will often throw in a few french fries from a fast food restaurant or a broken toy or something that I was able to scrounge from a nearby dumpster.

 

 

NOT suppose to put any kind of food in a cache.

 

 

 

 

:lol:-_-:wub:

 

:anicute:

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For a geocache container, particularly in a wet environment, I prefer to use a used quart-size or gallon-size ziplock plastic bag, so long as it does not have too many holes in it. And, for the logbook, I use the back of any handy receipt from a convenience store or from a fast food restaurant. For swag, I will often throw in a few french fries from a fast food restaurant or a broken toy or something that I was able to scrounge from a nearby dumpster.

 

 

NOT suppose to put any kind of food in a cache.

 

 

 

 

:lol:-_-:wub:

 

:anicute:

 

Don't you understand? He is being sarcastic. So many caches degrade to the point that many are found containing items almost as he describes. Many geocachers simply will not trade up or even. They take good swag and leave crap. That is the gist of the post by Vinny.

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Well.. Personally we use the following:

 

Micro: Either the new containers for juicy fruit or excel gum (22 packs) or we hit the dollar store and buy 3 packs of the key-holder magnet containers that you stick a key in and hide under your car.

 

Small: Dean's Milk 1qt bottles. Covered in black paint or camo tape.

 

Regular: Ammo Cans. I love them. but they are expensive sometimes. ($10)

 

So for el-cheapo cache containers hit your dollar store. They have tupperware style containers of all sizes and the key holders make great mag-micros and if you like milk get your parents to buy you 1qt Dean.s bottles. Great seal and wide mouth for rolled up log sheet.

 

I've been looking for an inexpensive "Large" container or aa new cache event we're planning. Pirate style. Gonna make it a treasure chest!

 

Good luck!

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