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Emergency Medical Id Card


BomberJohn
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For the last week or two, Nerves and I (along with suggestions from other cachers), have put together an Emergency Medical ID card that we as geocachers should carry with us as we journey through the woods and back country. In the unfortunate case of an accident, you will have a way to express your personal and medical information to others.

 

The pdf document we've created can be filled in, printed out, cut out, and laminated. Just click on the line of information you want to fill in and type. When done, print it out.

 

Should be simple enough. Thanks to thoses who have helped with the creation.

 

BomberJohn

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I had a friend who was in a bad car wreck. Several years ago she wanted to start a small business printing small laminated cards with the phone numbers of all the people who were important in her life-family, insurance, bank, lawyer (haha), etc. When she arrived at the hospital, the nurse was able to immediately get in touch with her daughter who had been looking for her since she had been talking on the cell phone with her at the time of the accident. (This didn't have anything to do with the wreck but talking on a cell phone while driving is not a good idea.) Anyway, the nuse said that she wished everyone had these cards. It made everything that followed so much easier because all her information was in one place.

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In addition to the card and the ICE-Number, make sure that someone knows where you were going, the route you were taking, and when you expect to be back.

 

Since we are in a hobby which requires us to get away from the public and to seek hidden things, we will be getting away from the public and putting ourselves where the hidden things are. Convaluted, ain't it?

 

If we happen to get hurt when we are in one of those hidden places, and no-one knows where we are, or even if we are gone, then we could be in some serious trouble.

 

Of course, we shouldn't be alone in places like that. Geocaching is much more fun with someone else. But if you must go it alone, then make sure someone knows.

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FYI, University Hospital Of Colorado, National Jewish Medical center, and several other hospitals in Colorado are recommending that no one use the "qd" abbreviation for medication taken once daily. It is too easy to confuse it with qid which is 4 times daily. University hospital has even gone so far as to put the following information on the screen savers of all the computers in the hospital. "Do not abbreviate qd. Write it out 'once daily'."

 

 

Just some helpful information.

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:o RE: ICE :)

 

I am a fire/ems dispatcher and many departments DO recognize this...HOWEVER, always carry a form of ID or emergency number with you. Put a little label on the back of your ID even with emergency contact info. ICE is a great idea, but when involved in an high impact accident, cell phones can be lost, tossed or damaged and the info not accessible.

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I really urge geocachers to fill out and print these cards. I recommend putting one in your wallet and hanging one around your neck like a dog tag. Give them to your friends and loved ones too.

 

You can make the card a "personal TB" and log all your miles that way :D

Great idea! Gonna order my bugs today.

 

BomberJohn

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What you mean you are not paperless caching. I have the RFID tag in my had with all my medeicala and favorite food programed in to it so that in the need there is no fumbling with paper.......

cheers

RFID?!?!? Yikes. A little too "Big Brother" for me. :P And as for printing out the card, use recycled paper. :D

 

BomberJohn

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I spoke to a local EMT and ER nurse and neither had heard of ICE. Would someone explain again the procedure for entering this on your cell and how emergency personnel would access the info?

 

Thanks.

ICE stands for In Case of Emergency... that is to long to put in the phone so you use the abbreviation for the name...ICE and then add the phone nume of the person you would want called if you were injured. A lot of times if you are incapacitated emergency workers will try to contact someone to let them know you were hurt. So instead of having "mom + phone number" it would be ICE + phone number"

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What a great thing to give to all of us Bomber John. I just printed several of them and will give them to my husband and kids and force them to put in their wallets. When my daughter moves in Jan, I will print blanks for her becasue her info will change.

 

Dawn

Dawn, thanks for the kind words. :cool: It is the product of a forum conversation with Nerves who had a terrible accident. We are very pleased how it came out and want as many people as possible to use it.

 

You can save the pdf document and create a new anytime you like. Do suggest laminating though.

 

Thanks again.

 

BomberJohn

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I'm an EMT.  Medical cards are EXTREMELY helpful.  Everyone should have one.  Thanks for the support! :cool:

I'm curious...as an EMT, where would you look for someone's medical info - around the neck, the wrist, wallet or pockets?

If you are found unconsious in the woods, responders will -likely- look for 1)friends, 2)bracelet, 3)wallet/pack, then 4)necklace in pursuit of medical info.

 

In my experience, by far the most common places to find medical info are 1) Family, friends and nursing staff, 2) Medications in the kitchen/bedroom/bathroom, 3)Notes and advanced directives on the refrigerator, 4) Bracelet, 5) one of 300 little scraps of paper in the purse. :huh:

 

I know it isn't strictly on topic, but the fridge is a great place for medical history, med lists and advanced directives if you or a family member are in declining health. It makes life much easier for everyone if, for example, I don't have to ask for your medications while you are short of breath :(

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I'm diabetic and usually caching on my lunch instead of eating (I know, I know) so I will be carrying this from now on!

 

This could very well turn out to be a lifesaver for someone in the the geo-community. Job well done!

 

***Hey Jeremy, this ought to be on gc.com in the downloadable documents section too!***

Edited by HugoBear
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I'm diabetic and usually caching on my lunch instead of eating (I know, I know) so I will be carrying this from now on!

 

This could very well turn out to be a lifesaver for someone in the the geo-community. Job well done!

 

***Hey Jeremy, this ought to be on gc.com in the downloadable documents section too!***

Thanks for the comments. I'm glad you'll use the card. I emailed Groundspeak about getting something like a TB tag that attached to the Medical ID Card but never heard back from them. Although I'm sure they get alot of emails I've had a response to another unrelated query in the past.

 

How about taking a lunch with you on your hunt? That way, you get to do the caches and eat while you're at it :blink:

 

Good suggestion to put this on the downloadable documents list. Anyone from GC.com listening? :P

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I'm an EMT.  Medical cards are EXTREMELY helpful.  Everyone should have one.  Thanks for the support! :anicute:

I'm curious...as an EMT, where would you look for someone's medical info - around the neck, the wrist, wallet or pockets?

Yes, I would look, neck & wrist. The wallet/purse is also checked for information, but not usually until we get to the hospital. Reason being, if you are that critical that you can't answer questions, I usually have my hands full treating you (unlike the ED where multiple nurses are there, I'm usually the only paramedic onscene with a limited amount of additional assistance from other rescue personnel). I have heard of 'ICE', but have never used it in the field for the same reason as above.

 

The more information that is on hand, always helps. I still recommend medic alert tags because they are able to be accessed quickly and easily with additional information being placed on medical cards and carried in wallet/purse.

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I'm diabetic and usually caching on my lunch instead of eating (I know, I know) so I will be carrying this from now on!

 

This could very well turn out to be a lifesaver for someone in the the geo-community. Job well done!

 

***Hey Jeremy, this ought to be on gc.com in the downloadable documents section too!***

Just sent another email to GC. We'll see what happens.

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Yes, I would look, neck & wrist. The wallet/purse is also checked for information, but not usually until we get to the hospital. Reason being, if you are that critical that you can't answer questions, I usually have my hands full treating you (unlike the ED where multiple nurses are there, I'm usually the only paramedic onscene with a limited amount of additional assistance from other rescue personnel).

 

The more information that is on hand, always helps. I still recommend medic alert tags because they are able to be accessed quickly and easily with additional information being placed on medical cards and carried in wallet/purse.

OK folks - you've heard it from the EMTs that the medical ID card is important to have.

 

A friend's brother died of cardiac arrest on a sidewalk the day before Thanksgiving. Everyone thought he was drunk or homeless. He didn't have any medical info on him.

 

Ideally, I think the card should be worn on a lanyard or dogtag around the neck with another card in the wallet.

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I'm curious...as an EMT, where would you look for someone's medical info - around the neck, the wrist, wallet or pockets?

Usually, we look for medical ID bracelets or a necklace. In extreme cases, we will check the wallet, but this is rare.

 

:anitongue:

Where I don't have any allergies or take any meds or have any medical issue. I figure the hospital will look to identify me. And my info will be right there.

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My EMT friend tells me she lets the cops check the pocket and wallet while she checks the neck and wrist. If the cops don't respond to the call, she will look in the wallet.

 

One thing that clearly drives her nuts as well as the other EMTs in our area are people that don't know their meds. She really wishes everyone had a medical ID card.

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In addition to the card and the ICE-Number, make sure that someone knows where you were going, the route you were taking, and when you expect to be back.

 

Since we are in a hobby which requires us to get away from the public and to seek hidden things, we will be getting away from the public and putting ourselves where the hidden things are. Convaluted, ain't it?

 

If we happen to get hurt when we are in one of those hidden places, and no-one knows where we are, or even if we are gone, then we could be in some serious trouble.

 

Of course, we shouldn't be alone in places like that. Geocaching is much more fun with someone else. But if you must go it alone, then make sure someone knows.

Unfortunatly that is not a valid option for some of us. I have no one (short of a long distance call 4,000 miles away) to tell I am going caching. I have co workers who would wonder why I was telling them this and would not know that I never came back unless I didn't show up at work. If I sent my daughter to the babysitters while I cached, which I have to do most of the time, then SHE would wonder where I was when I didn't show up but wouldn't even think to call the police I am sure.

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Unfortunatly that is not a valid option for some of us. I have no one (short of a long distance call 4,000 miles away) to tell I am going caching. I have co workers who would wonder why I was telling them this and would not know that I never came back unless I didn't show up at work. If I sent my daughter to the babysitters while I cached, which I have to do most of the time, then SHE would wonder where I was when I didn't show up but wouldn't even think to call the police I am sure.

An email with your contact person or a note on your fridge (or locked in your glove box) can help searchers find your car and start looking for you. Even if your friend/contact/babysitter doesn't know the placenames involved, the searchers will -if- you leave a note or voicemail. I've done this several times when solo hiking. ;)

 

Countless times we've quickly found someone (or even just called them back on their cell phone and told them how to get home) after a dispatcher (who has no idea where in the world they are talking about) says "they say they are near somewhere called poo-poo-point" :huh:

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Back to the medical info wallet card, 3M makes a self-laminating tag that works great for these cards. It's called "self-sealing laminating pouches for bag tags." I just got some at my neighborhood drug store in the office supply section. You simply peel back the top layer, remove the paper insert, add your own item to be laminated, and then let the top layer go back in place. Lightly press with your hand.... Then you're done. There is even a loop you can use to attach your card to your belt, backpack, whatever.

 

I've even used these pouches to attach to travel bugs if the tbs have special goals or missions.

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Back to the medical info wallet card, 3M makes a self-laminating tag that works great for these cards. It's called "self-sealing laminating pouches for bag tags." I just got some at my neighborhood drug store in the office supply section. You simply peel back the top layer, remove the paper insert, add your own item to be laminated, and then let the top layer go back in place. Lightly press with your hand.... Then you're done. There is even a loop you can use to attach your card to your belt, backpack, whatever.

 

I've even used these pouches to attach to travel bugs if the tbs have special goals or missions.

Excellent idea Teachermom. They also have similar products in all the office supply stores; Office Max, Staples, .....

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Good Idea.I have been carrying something like that for years.

Everyone should carry one.

The one thing I might suggest is not to have your spouse listed as your primary contact in case of emergency.

Have it set up with another family member or a good friend that you can trust.

Nothing can be worse than getting bad news from a total stranger in an emergency.

A family member or a friend can be a calming influence when delivering the message, and can answer questions from Med. personel in a calmer maner if need be.

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The one thing I might suggest is not to have your spouse listed as your primary contact in case of emergency.

Have it set up with another family member or a good friend that you can trust.

Nothing can be worse than getting bad news from a total stranger in an emergency.

A family member or a friend can be a calming influence when delivering the message, and can answer questions from Med. personel in a calmer maner if need be.

That's a good thought. I would suggest confirming that with your spouse or significant other to be sure that's what they want too.

 

I've had patients who had both a wife and girlfriend (some with children by both) each of whom didn't know about the other. Friends were contacted during an emergency and notified both women. That created quite a dilemma especially during visiting hours. We had to get security on more than one occasion.

:ph34r::):ph34r:

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I've had patients who had both a wife and girlfriend (some with children by both) each of whom didn't know about the other. Friends were contacted during an emergency and notified both women. That created quite a dilemma especially during visiting hours. We had to get security on more than one occasion.

;):ph34r: :ph34r:

:) Sounds like an episode of Desperate Housewives.

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Great idea. Just one thing to add when filling out this form. When entering the emergency contacts put how they are related.

 

Example: Jane Doe (Wife), John Doe Jr (Son), Jim Smith (Freind)

 

As a former EMS Paramedic knowing how the contact person is relayed to the injured / ill person can be very helpful.

Edited by N8OFP - Del
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