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nericksx

Responsible player protocol: fixing caches

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It seemed like when I started (9 years ago), carrying supplies so that you could mend caches was commendable player protocol:

  • fresh log paper to deal with full/soggy logs
  • SWAG to refill sad caches
  • extra pens/pencils to leave
  • duct tape to mend broken containers
  • replacement containers to deal with busted ones

 

Reading the forums these days, though, it seems like this is frowned upon to some extent. It sounds like seasoned players don't want to be propping up crappy caches and negligent CO's. I'm getting the impression that replacing a bad container is particularly egregious. I recently logged a Found/NM on a cache that was a plastic Folgers tub. I found the cache, on the ground a few feet from its hiding place, lid off with a hole chewed in it, a few little trinkets scattered around, a single sheet of log, and rodent poo in it. I logged the find because I did find the silly thing, even though it was in pieces. If I'd had a fresh container I would have reset the whole thing, as it was I could only clean it out and set it back in place. From what I'm reading, some players would have logged this as a DNF.

 

I took a caching hiatus for a couple years but I'm back at it and I'm putting together my caching supplies kit. I'm wondering if taking care of other people's caches is now bad form and maybe I shouldn't be hauling all this stuff around? 9 years ago there were way fewer caches, so there was probably less consternation around propping up bad ones. 

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I still carry extra log sheets (printed on weatherproof paper) and duct tape. But I won't replace the container, or restock trade items or pens/pencils. And if the log is soggy or if the container needs a little duct tape, then I also post a NM log because the owner needs to address the issue more permanently.

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3 hours ago, nericksx said:

I took a caching hiatus for a couple years but I'm back at it and I'm putting together my caching supplies kit. I'm wondering if taking care of other people's caches is now bad form and maybe I shouldn't be hauling all this stuff around? 9 years ago there were way fewer caches, so there was probably less consternation around propping up bad ones. 

 

Even though some selfish players have opinion that all maintenance is allowed only by the cache owner, guidelines have not changed over these years.

 

The confusion is due to the fact that some statistically oriented players have planted completely new cache if they have not found the original. Even this is ok if you communicate with the cache owner about the situation.

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From what I've seen in the forums throughout the years, no one's mind will be changed.

 

If someone wants to do maintenance on other people's caches they will. No one will convince them otherwise. 

And those who see most community maintenance as propping up, and not a help to the community, will continue to feel that way too, no matter how much the pros and cons get hashed out. 

 

My personal choice, based on my experience in a very cache dense area full of set-em-and-forget-em caches--I help the community by logging NMs and NAs, and sometimes (with a note in my NM/NA log) removing caches in terrible condition (moldy biohazards). 

Edited by L0ne.R
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7 hours ago, arisoft said:

some selfish players have opinion that all maintenance is allowed only by the cache owner

 

If it's one of my caches, I know its condition. Once it deteriorates enough to warrant the work, I will fix it myself, or I've already planned to archive it when it fails. I even might have a new idea for a cache ready create in that spot.  Communication is preferable to taping my cache together.

 

If you “fix” my cache, it is not fixed. You've put in the work for nothing. I will replace your “fixed” version of my cache, or archive the whole thing. And therefore I get browbeaten over my “selfishness”?! Way cool, dude. :ph34r:

 

 

Edited by kunarion
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12 hours ago, nericksx said:

It seemed like when I started (9 years ago), carrying supplies so that you could mend caches was commendable player protocol:

  • fresh log paper to deal with full/soggy logs
  • SWAG to refill sad caches
  • extra pens/pencils to leave
  • duct tape to mend broken containers
  • replacement containers to deal with busted ones

 

Reading the forums these days, though, it seems like this is frowned upon to some extent. It sounds like seasoned players don't want to be propping up crappy caches and negligent CO's. I'm getting the impression that replacing a bad container is particularly egregious. I recently logged a Found/NM on a cache that was a plastic Folgers tub. I found the cache, on the ground a few feet from its hiding place, lid off with a hole chewed in it, a few little trinkets scattered around, a single sheet of log, and rodent poo in it. I logged the find because I did find the silly thing, even though it was in pieces. If I'd had a fresh container I would have reset the whole thing, as it was I could only clean it out and set it back in place. From what I'm reading, some players would have logged this as a DNF.

 

I took a caching hiatus for a couple years but I'm back at it and I'm putting together my caching supplies kit. I'm wondering if taking care of other people's caches is now bad form and maybe I shouldn't be hauling all this stuff around? 9 years ago there were way fewer caches, so there was probably less consternation around propping up bad ones. 

 

Don't break my cache and don't fix my cache if someone broke it. Restore into its exact hiding spot. If there's a problem, make a Needs Maintenance log, and move on. That's a suitable plan for any cache you find. No complaining allowed that I keep my cache nice and repaired, nor complain that I don't appreciate you fixing it for me. Don't fix it. “NM” and move on. Broken or not it's not yours to mess with.  And the part about breaking it, stop that. :mad:  Would kinda solve the whole problem.

 

There are tons of threads around here on how to deal with maintenance issues, including reasons to leave maintenance to the Cache Owner. CO long gone, very old stat-important caches are to this day taped together, maintained in a huge soaking wet muddy broken moldy mess by the Geocaching community. It still happens. Sweet.  Whatever.  Decide for yourself what you repair.  Just don't "fix" mine, and don't break mine. B)

 

I sometimes add a signed slip of paper to a cache, but since I'm there anyway to see the cool place, I most often hang a log sheet to dry and then sign it. A previously soaking wet log has many available signing places, even if “full of signatures”. I bring extra pens and golf pencils, especially for Intro App people, since they don't own a writing utensil. I place Swag unless the box is empty/trashed (I don't provide new toys for the non-caching neighbors to raid).   As for replacing/fixing containers, if it's a good caching friend who's not able to get out this month, I might install an O-ring if I have my stuff, and can clean it all up.  Other than that, nope.

 

 

Edited by kunarion
I was bowling the game of my life and so I couldn’t type well.
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1 hour ago, kunarion said:

I've already planned to archive it when it fails. I even might have a new idea for a cache ready create in that spot.

 

You can archive your cache when ever you need it to be archived but making a new cache to the same spot is called churning and it is worse thing than throwdowns are.

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45 minutes ago, arisoft said:

 

You can archive your cache when ever you need it to be archived but making a new cache to the same spot is called churning and it is worse thing than throwdowns are.

Kind of depends on the time frame involved, and I'm not at all convinced that throwdowns are "worse" than churning.  The Guidelines state the following in the "Must be Accessible" portion of the Guidelines (once referred to as "Cache Permanence"), which implies relisting a cache in less than 3 months is considered churning, otherwise not (YMMV):

 

Quote

Temporary caches intended to stay active for fewer than three months will not be published.

 

On the plus side, at least a churning cache owner is an active cache owner (setting aside the stale data problem).  A thowdown, on the other hand, usually indicates an unresponsive or absent owner.

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13 hours ago, nericksx said:

I'm wondering if taking care of other people's caches is now bad form and maybe I shouldn't be hauling all this stuff around? 9 years ago there were way fewer caches, so there was probably less consternation around propping up bad ones. 

 

I sorta agree that many years ago there was less issue with aiding another cacher until they can fix it themselves than today, but I don't see folks anxious over it today. 

"Fixing" caches temporarily was common well-before '09,  some simply meant wiping out the metal cookie tin or Tupperware , or maybe replacing the plastic bag wrapped around it (if one had a spare).  Ammo cans didn't have that issue...

 - I don't recall one player ever replacing a just-found container belonging to another.  That would be rude even back then  here...

 

 

 

Edited by cerberus1
clarifications...

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2 minutes ago, cerberus1 said:

metal cookie tin

 

 

I recently found a large metal cookie tin cache, which has been in place for 14 years.  In Atlanta's steamy summers and all.  Even the sparse contents are fine.  Even more or less fully exposed to the elements.  I'm much more impressed when a hide is placed in a way that truly makes it maintenance-free, than finding it all rusted-out and taped up by previous finders.  And I want to make caches like that. :)

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1 hour ago, arisoft said:

making a new cache to the same spot is called churning and it is worse thing than throwdowns are.

 

OK, no cache for you! :lol:

 

Now it's a birdhouse puzzle with electronics and a remote controlled stage, and 85% Favorited. Sooo much worse. B)

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I have heard couple of CO's saying they don't want anyone to fix their caches without their consent. They consider the caches and their shape to be something like their trademark. Not sure whether I expressed myself right. I am actually one of them, if something goes wrong I would like the finder to report the troubles with NM and I will take care of it. It may even happen that it's not the first time the cache is in troubles/lost and it's time for relocation,  then I would prepare my container anyway and would not want to keep using someone's provisory micro with a piece of paper or whatever he has dropped there.

 

The consent is important. A few years ago I helped a long-time sick CO. His cache was lost and he was not physically able to get to the hide on a hill. I contacted him, he told me how the cache was supposed to look and also told me exactly how it had been hidden. I prepared the container, sent him the photo and after he agreed (he was very grateful :-)) I placed the cache to its spot.

 

I am talking about completely broken or missing container here - I sure would be grateful to a cacher having temporarily fixed cracks in the container with a tape or added a sheet of paper as long as he lets me know about it as soon as possible so I can start thinking about replacing the box or logbook.

Edited by Pontiac_CZ
paragraph about temp fix
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We added Rite in Rain strips (in a baggie that fits it...) to all our bags since we started. 

They're there simply to help bide time for the CO until they can fix whatever issue there is. 

 - Things floating mostly...

Since we still have an actual steamer trunk full of "stuff"  (too many micros), we'll drop things in on the rare time we're at somewhere close-to a "child-friendly" type cache that, as normal, is picked clean by takers.

 - But not if things are floating...

If the CO isn't acting on mentions in Found It logs (we do) , and there's a couple mentions, we'll leave a NM to give a "better" heads-up.

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45 minutes ago, Touchstone said:

A throwdown, on the other hand, usually indicates an unresponsive or absent owner.

 

A minor point, Touchstone, but in my experience, a 'throwdown' is just as likely to simply mean a "self-important-DNF".

 

It's the "bio-cache", on the other hand that probably reflects an "unresponsive or absent owner."

 

And, I want credit for that term here in the foraverse. Thank you.

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3 minutes ago, TeamRabbitRun said:

a 'throwdown' is just as likely to simply mean a "self-important-DNF".

 

+1

If one doesn't "fix the cache", there is sometimes the danger of accruing no Smiley.

 

 

3 minutes ago, TeamRabbitRun said:

It's the "bio-cache", on the other hand that probably reflects an "unresponsive or absent owner."

 

And, I want credit for that term here in the foraverse. Thank you.

 

Too late.  I saved that in my list of Forum Avatar Titles.  If I use that as my Title, after while everyone will naturally think I thought of it. :P

 

Except that I can't actually change my Avatar Forum Title. :ph34r:

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24 minutes ago, kunarion said:

Too late.  I saved that in my list of Forum Avatar Titles.  If I use that as my Title, after while everyone will naturally think I thought of it. :P

 

Except that I can't actually change my Avatar Forum Title.

 

A shame. It's a good one!

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Interesting feedback. I didn't specifically note it in my OP, but I would totally log a NM if I mended a cache.

 

I currently have packed fresh logs (in various sizes printed on waterproof paper and in small zip bags),  extra little zip bags, duct tape, golf pencils, and fresh geocache explanation write-ups (printed on waterproof paper with a place to fill in the GC and cache name).

 

Thinking about it, I'd be torqued if someone replaced a container of mine - but I place ammo cans and really nice lock-&-locks. I think I'll have to take container replacement on a case by case basis. A container that someone clearly spent some time on - by applying camo or whatever - I wouldn't replace. The freakin' plastic Folgers canister I referenced in my OP - if I replaced it, it would be an upgrade. I don't replace containers with film canisters, I replace size for size with lock-and-locks. 

 

I think I'm going to continue with my ethos of cache mending, then giving the CO a heads up. My purpose is always to prop up the cache for the next player or two, until the CO can get out there - not to unofficially adopt someone's cache

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3 minutes ago, nericksx said:

extra little zip bags


Just a heads up. Sometimes they get caught in the seal. Some owners don't put their logs in zip bags for that reason. 

I use authentic Lock & Locks. The gasketed seal does an excellent job until that seal is compromised.  I have sometimes visited my Lock&Lock cache, especially in the springtime after a thaw, to find the contents swimming in water, including the logbook that is now in a baggie, and a bit of that baggie poking between the seal. 

I know the finder meant well, but good containers will keep the contents dry without the need of a baggie.

 

However if you're going to add baggies, you indicate yours are little. Little baggies that fit completely in the container without the need to squeeze out air and fold the baggie, are a much better choice and less likely to get caught in a seal. 

 

The most important thing is that the CO start with a good quality gasketed container. Then the CO should check regularly to be sure it's still in good shape. (Regularly depends on the conditions of the location, protection from weather, number of visitors, etc.). Even good quality containers get compromised or inexplicably broken.  Unfortunately most COs never check and most finders prop up, and don't log NMs or NAs. 

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44 minutes ago, L0ne.R said:

Just a heads up. Sometimes they get caught in the seal. Some owners don't put their logs in zip bags for that reason. 

 

I use very few ziplock bags inside my caches.  I removed several bags after one of my lay-flat ammo can hides acquired water due to a ziplock bag being closed in the lid seal.  The contents got soaked.  But since the log book was in that ziplock bag, that book was spared.

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25 minutes ago, kunarion said:

But since the log book was in that ziplock bag, that book was spared.

 

Yes. That happens. It's probably a 50/50 chance the logbook will be spared.

Especially if the cache doesn't sit for a month swimming in thawed liquid. 

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46 minutes ago, L0ne.R said:


Just a heads up. Sometimes they get caught in the seal. Some owners don't put their logs in zip bags for that reason. 

I use authentic Lock & Locks. The gasketed seal does an excellent job until that seal is compromised.  I have sometimes visited my Lock&Lock cache, especially in the springtime after a thaw, to find the contents swimming in water, including the logbook that is now in a baggie, and a bit of that baggie poking between the seal. 

I know the finder meant well, but good containers will keep the contents dry without the need of a baggie.

 

However if you're going to add baggies, you indicate yours are little. Little baggies that fit completely in the container without the need to squeeze out air and fold the baggie, are a much better choice and less likely to get caught in a seal. 

 

The most important thing is that the CO start with a good quality gasketed container. Then the CO should check regularly to be sure it's still in good shape. (Regularly depends on the conditions of the location, protection from weather, number of visitors, etc.). Even good quality containers get compromised or inexplicably broken.  Unfortunately most COs never check and most finders prop up, and don't log NMs or NAs. 

 

Since you're concerned, I carry logs in 3 sizes, for various sized caches, in nearly-perfect-fit zip bags. I'm not new to caching and I like to think I have an ounce or two of common sense.

 

I really appreciate everyone's feedback because it's made me think about what problem I'm trying to solve here. I guess it comes down to really hating finding gross, soggy, moldy, icky caches, and I assume other people aren't fans either. If I can spend a few minutes and a few pennies to keep someone from having a bad time - then that seems like the right thing to do. I'm out to leave things "better than I found them" (within reason, obviously), not to let bad COs off the hook or mess with someone's painstakingly crafted cache container. With that being clarified for myself - I'm going to mend/fix/repair/replace as necessary to leave a good experience behind, and if the CO is unhappy about that then they should probably have used a better container and/or should maintain their cache. 

20181104_144434.png

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27 minutes ago, kunarion said:

 

I use very few ziplock bags inside my caches.  I removed several bags after one of my lay-flat ammo can hides acquired water due to a ziplock bag being closed in the lid seal.  The contents got soaked.  But since the log book was in that ziplock bag, that book was spared.

 

I'm agnostic on baggies. I use waterproof paper, so it might be redundant and end up causing more heartache than it saves - but it does keep the log from getting dirty, generally. I use them in my caches. What a strange point of controversy! To baggie, or not to baggie?!?

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On 11/4/2018 at 6:11 PM, nericksx said:

I like to think I have an ounce or two of common sense.

 

You do. I am also saying this for those who may be reading and haven't considered the size of the baggie.  Many put baggies in caches that are too big for the container. And whenever anyone has put my logbook(s) in a baggie, it's too big for the container. Probably because I use logbooks, not scrolls or sheets and they won't fit in bead bags but a sandwich size bag is too big. 

Edited by L0ne.R
grammar

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6 hours ago, arisoft said:

You can archive your cache when ever you need it to be archived but making a new cache to the same spot is called churning and it is worse thing than throwdowns are.

 

In my book, churning is the local organization that hides caches for events,  Then archives them and hides new ones the next year for the next event.  Or archives the caches in the county park, and rehides new ones (usually at the same spot; sometimes the same container).  Until the county park started requesting permission for new hides  

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On 11/4/2018 at 2:22 AM, arisoft said:

 

Even though some selfish players have opinion that all maintenance is allowed only by the cache owner

 

 

Excuse me? I find about 1100 caches a year on average and if I had to fix every cache that needed work, THAT'S ALL I'D BE DOING. I understand the concept of helping out once in a while but I didn't sign up to fix other people's garbage.

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On 11/4/2018 at 5:11 PM, nericksx said:

 

Since you're concerned, I carry logs in 3 sizes, for various sized caches, in nearly-perfect-fit zip bags. I'm not new to caching and I like to think I have an ounce or two of common sense.

 

I really appreciate everyone's feedback because it's made me think about what problem I'm trying to solve here. I guess it comes down to really hating finding gross, soggy, moldy, icky caches, and I assume other people aren't fans either. If I can spend a few minutes and a few pennies to keep someone from having a bad time - then that seems like the right thing to do. I'm out to leave things "better than I found them" (within reason, obviously), not to let bad COs off the hook or mess with someone's painstakingly crafted cache container. With that being clarified for myself - I'm going to mend/fix/repair/replace as necessary to leave a good experience behind, and if the CO is unhappy about that then they should probably have used a better container and/or should maintain their cache. 

20181104_144434.png

 

It's those "nearly perfect fit" baggies that cause most of them be ripped apart in record time.

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8 hours ago, bflentje said:

Excuse me? I find about 1100 caches a year on average and if I had to fix every cache that needed work, THAT'S ALL I'D BE DOING. I understand the concept of helping out once in a while but I didn't sign up to fix other people's garbage. 

 

You have 675 caches. You definitely have no time to find 1100 caches per year if you are going to fix your own caches first. Maybe someone helped you a little. Just guessing 😃

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12 hours ago, bflentje said:

It's those "nearly perfect fit" baggies that cause most of them be ripped apart in record time.

 

You beat me to it.

 

The bags need to be slightly larger than the log they contain to facilitate extraction that doesn't result in the side seams getting ripped, rendering the bag useless in an instant.

 

If I find a cache with a log that's a tight fit in its bag I usually fold the log double to make its surface area smaller before putting it back in the bag to save the next finder wrestling to get the log outta the !£'* bag.

 

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If the contents of the baggie can rotate entirely and freely within the baggie (so as not to have corners slice the edges) then I generally consider that a good sized baggie. Smaller than that is risky. A tight fit is almost guaranteed to fail over time (dependent upon how many careless geocachers find it).

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3 hours ago, Team Microdot said:

 

You beat me to it.

 

The bags need to be slightly larger than the log they contain to facilitate extraction that doesn't result in the side seams getting ripped, rendering the bag useless in an instant.

 

If I find a cache with a log that's a tight fit in its bag I usually fold the log double to make its surface area smaller before putting it back in the bag to save the next finder wrestling to get the log outta the !£'* bag.

 

 

I do have quite a time trying to fit a snug log sheet without ripping the bag.  Regardless of size, ziplock bags are only designed to be opened and closed a couple of times. Most have been inside their Micro for fifteen years and hundreds of finds.  Even though the size is absolute perfection, it's only a remnant of what was once a plastic bag.  If everyone's gonna do that anyway, it might be better to cut the "zipper" part off when it's first placed.

 

Edited by kunarion
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The small baggies are difficult to open and extract the contents for people with large fingers, or poor grip. I probably rip open 1 in 4 as a result. I probably tear another 1 in 6 trying to get the log in and out. Larger baggies please.

 

Regarding the OP's initial question, I don't routinely carry any of the supplies mentioned. Most of the time, I'm not wearing a backpack and don't have room to carry much. When I do have a backpack, it has a journal (which I can take a page out of and use for a log) and SWAG, along with survival and first aid equipment.

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I recently helped 'clean up' a cache.  The last find was 2 weeks before mine and no prior finds mentioned any issues. When I found the cache, there was a candy inside that had oozed out of its wrapper and gotten onto a piece of swag inside.  So, I walked 100 ft to the public restroom and threw out the candy and piece of swag, rinsed out the container, dried it, and the replaced it.  I could've just left the candy inside and logged an NM, but I chose to take a different approach.

 

A few weeks ago, I added a sheet of RIR paper to a cache that had its original logsheets filled up that day and I knew there would be multiple cachers visiting the cache within the next 24 hours.  I could've just left the brand-new, highly-favorited cache as-is and logged an NM about a full log, but I chose to take a different approach.

 

Adding a logsheet to tide a cache over until the CO can get to it, or wiping out a cache container and/or its seals are 'maintenance' actions that I don't mind doing - if I am properly equipped.  I don't consider it appropriate to replace a container, whether I found or didn't find the cache.

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11 hours ago, noncentric said:

Adding a logsheet to tide a cache over until the CO can get to it, or wiping out a cache container and/or its seals are 'maintenance' actions that I don't mind doing - if I am properly equipped.  I don't consider it appropriate to replace a container, whether I found or didn't find the cache.

 

Me as well but only when I actually have the time and/or the materials on me.  Otherwise, it's a NM log in most cases.  I don't always carry them because the boss coach and I swap out cars occasionally and she hates a cluttered car, even if all the stuff is inside a single bag.  Go figure.

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56 minutes ago, coachstahly said:

Me as well but only when I actually have the time and/or the materials on me.  Otherwise, it's a NM log in most cases.  I don't always carry them because the boss coach and I swap out cars occasionally and she hates a cluttered car, even if all the stuff is inside a single bag.  Go figure.

 

Yes. There are times when I wish I had a napkin or such on me, to wipe some dirt from the seal of a cache container.  Sometimes I'll just use my clothing or a leaf from nearby, but most of the instances I'm thinking of are caches that aren't in that bad of shape.  I mean, the cache and contents are just fine, but I just notice that the seals are dirty.  In those cases, I don't log an NM, because there isn't anything for the CO to maintain.

 

If a cache is 'yucky', then I'm less likely to clean it because (1) it probably requires more than just a single napkin or leaf to clean up and/or (2) my cleaning isn't going to resolve the problem that caused it to get 'yucky' in the first place. So for those, I'll try to dry out the logsheet to where I can sign it (and maybe the next finders if they show up within just a few days after my visit) and then I'll log a Found It and NM.

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On 11/10/2018 at 1:47 AM, noncentric said:

Adding a logsheet to tide a cache over until the CO can get to it, or wiping out a cache container and/or its seals are 'maintenance' actions that I don't mind doing - if I am properly equipped.

We add logsheets if there is room in the container; add baggies if needed; remove candy and other inappropriate items and note that in our logs.  We would appreciate that for caches we are about to find, so we pay it forward? If it's something we can't deal with or are unprepared for at the time, we post a NM log.  We've dried out containers, adjusted hangers, tweaked hides to make it better for the next finder, and usually made a note in our logs to that effect.

 

Unless we know the CO, we generally don't make too many changes.   If we can improve the hide without affecting the integrity of the cache, we will do so if we can.  We know we would appreciate that effort in caches we are seeking, so we try to pay it forward, without stepping on any CO toes in the process!!

Edited by CAVinoGal
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1 hour ago, CAVinoGal said:

Unless we know the CO, we generally don't make too many changes.   If we can improve the hide without affecting the integrity of the cache, we will do so if we can.  We know we would appreciate that effort in caches we are seeking, so we try to pay it forward, without stepping on any CO toes in the process!!

 

One of my older hides, now archived, was a fake rock sitting under a ledge amongst some other rocks, its distinctive "Martian rock" red colour being the hint. It was meant to be hiding in plain sight, but a few times "helpful" finders would conceal it behind other rocks, making it a lot tougher than intended. On occasion I'd go to check on it, almost convinced it had been muggled until finally spotting it tucked away completely out of sight. Buried deep within the Help Centre is a rule that says When you are finished, put the cache back exactly as you found it, even if you think you see a better spot for it, and I try to follow that unless the cache is obviously misplaced, like sitting out in the open when the hint says it's under a ledge.

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On 11/9/2018 at 2:32 AM, arisoft said:

 

You have 675 caches. You definitely have no time to find 1100 caches per year if you are going to fix your own caches first. Maybe someone helped you a little. Just guessing 😃

 

No, if you're going to be a creepy stalker at least figure out that I don't own 675 active caches. But that I've hidden 675 caches in my 13 year geocaching history.

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Since I first started Geocaching I stuck with the 'Leave the Geocache container exactly how you found it" rule as much as possible. I admit, it has been hard not wanting to tend to the cache when I can fix it. I mean, one cache in particular, someone put in a fast-food ketchup packet into a small  container that filled up more room than the log. I still left it as is.

 

I feel split on if I should fix these caches when I can. I never re-visit a Geocache more than once, so if I have the tools to fix it I'd be inclined to do so immediately. However, I never do, because I know some COs get offended when these caches get tampered with for their own reasons. I respect that, but considering I only NM something when it is really damaged, it makes me wonder if I should at least provide a band-aid solution then just mark it as NM.

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Just now, bflentje said:

 

No, if you're going to be a creepy stalker at least figure out that I don't own 675 active caches. But that I've hidden 675 caches in my 13 year geocaching history.


It doesn't fall under the lines of "Stalker" when your profile information is literally just a click of the username.

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Just now, CheshireCrab said:


It doesn't fall under the lines of "Stalker" when your profile information is literally just a click of the username.

 

It is when the creepy stalker wants to incorrectly prove some point.

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Just now, bflentje said:

 

It is when the creepy stalker wants to incorrectly prove some point.

That doesn't at all change things, that's just plain name-calling.

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1 minute ago, CheshireCrab said:

That doesn't at all change things, that's just plain name-calling.

 

Kind of creepy to defend an incorrect assertion made by a profile stalker. But thanks for your off-topic contribution.

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1 hour ago, CheshireCrab said:

Since I first started Geocaching I stuck with the 'Leave the Geocache container exactly how you found it" rule as much as possible. I admit, it has been hard not wanting to tend to the cache when I can fix it. I mean, one cache in particular, someone put in a fast-food ketchup packet into a small  container that filled up more room than the log. I still left it as is.

 

I feel split on if I should fix these caches when I can. I never re-visit a Geocache more than once, so if I have the tools to fix it I'd be inclined to do so immediately. However, I never do, because I know some COs get offended when these caches get tampered with for their own reasons. I respect that, but considering I only NM something when it is really damaged, it makes me wonder if I should at least provide a band-aid solution then just mark it as NM.

I don't think there's anything wrong with removing food items that another finder left as swag and I would be surprised if any CO was offended by a finder removing food from their cache. Unless, of course, the CO left the food there intentionally. In such cases, I would and have removed the food item anyway, because food should just not be left in caches.

 

Different cachers have different "lines" that they will or will not cross when it comes to "fixing up" another cacher's caches.  I tend to think about whether the 'issue' with the cache is something the CO affected, or it it's something that a previous finder affected, and then make up my mind from there.  I also incorporate the remoteness of the cache and what, if anything, I know about the CO in my decision of what to do, or not do.

 

 

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On 11/12/2018 at 1:52 PM, CheshireCrab said:

Since I first started Geocaching I stuck with the 'Leave the Geocache container exactly how you found it" rule as much as possible. I admit, it has been hard not wanting to tend to the cache when I can fix it. I mean, one cache in particular, someone put in a fast-food ketchup packet into a small  container that filled up more room than the log. I still left it as is.

 

I feel split on if I should fix these caches when I can. I never re-visit a Geocache more than once, so if I have the tools to fix it I'd be inclined to do so immediately. However, I never do, because I know some COs get offended when these caches get tampered with for their own reasons. I respect that, but considering I only NM something when it is really damaged, it makes me wonder if I should at least provide a band-aid solution then just mark it as NM.

 

Ketchup packets (food), candy, gum, smelly candles, or bubbles (liquids) would all be removed by me.  If I had swag I might add it, but even without adding, I would take these items away -- they are not good to have in caches.  I don't look at it as a maintenance issue as much as a bad choice of swag, but removing it is improving the cache.

 

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On 11/12/2018 at 10:52 AM, CheshireCrab said:

Since I first started Geocaching I stuck with the 'Leave the Geocache container exactly how you found it" rule as much as possible. I admit, it has been hard not wanting to tend to the cache when I can fix it. I mean, one cache in particular, someone put in a fast-food ketchup packet into a small  container that filled up more room than the log. I still left it as is.

 

I, too, try to put the cache back as we found it ... but I DO remove food items that should not be in there in the first place.  And if the container is laying on the ground, and the hint says "hanging" and there's a hook/nail on the pole where we found the cache on the ground, then we'll hang it on the hook, and I'll note in my log that we placed it back "in keeping with the hint".  If it's not clear where the cache is supposed to be, then we put it back where we found it.

 

I'll add a logsheet if there's room to add another, or replace it if I know the CO and call them to see what to do with the old (usually it's to toss it).  If we aren't familiar with the CO, or in an area away from home, we'll just note in our logs and post an NM if something needs to be done.

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I wouldn't personally mind if someone helped out on my caches, as long as they let me know so I can check it out. I have dried logs in front of my car vents many times, filled swagless caches. I carry everything with me, baggies, paper, ducktape, lots of swag (love grabbing junk at flea markets and at stores where items discounted to $.10). I always log anything I do. I love to collect odd and unusual containers as hiding isn't a one size fits all approach, but if one isn't dry please tend it, let me know, and I'll go address it.

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I posted a similar topic a couple of years ago and got reamed pretty good for it.  Since I have a couple of hundred caches out, maintaining them is of utmost importance to me.  BUT, in the case where an urban camper might have messed with the cache and a finder replaces a lot sheet or puts on  a piece of duct tape for a temporary fix, I am most grateful.  My average turn around on a NM log on my cache is about 48 hours and my record is five minutes.  and if there is a problem (such as I spent 2 months in another state carrying for my daughter who had surgery), I will post that I will fix it when I am back in town.  From my point of view, there is nothing wrong with doing a little care to a damaged cache.  As a matter of fact, I think it is classy!  And when someone puts a new log in one of my caches, I send them a "Thank You" personnel message.  There is nothing wrong with helping each other in this sport of ours.  (I am NOT talking about a throw down, just a repair/maintenance to a damaged cache)

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