Jump to content

Types of Ammo Cans


cheetahspots
Followers 0

Recommended Posts

Late last night, I caught the ebay bug and purchased a Plano Ammo Can, Model 131250. We are relatively new cachers, and have been planning our first hide for a while now (we're moving soon, thus the procrastination.) I plan on giving it for Christmas, filled with other geo-realted items to my caching/life partner.

 

My question is, in my haste, I didn't think through whether to get a plastic or metal one. Is there a big difference, for the long term health of the cache?

 

We live in Virginia, USA. Temperatures range from 9F - 95F, and humidity is often above 50%, if that information helps.

 

Honestly, I've never paid too much attention to the type of ammo cans we find, and it wasn't until my dad asked me this morning whether it was plastic or metal, that I even considered it.

 

Thank you in advance for any input!

Link to comment

I would also recommend a metal military surplus ammo can...they are the gold standard of cache containers. I've never come across any of the Plano style plastic cans in the wild either.

 

That said, in the right location, somewhere fairly sheltered and not prone to flooding (where the can would be completely submerged for extended periods), it would probably do OK.

Link to comment

Late last night, I caught the ebay bug and purchased a Plano Ammo Can, Model 131250. We are relatively new cachers, and have been planning our first hide for a while now (we're moving soon, thus the procrastination.) I plan on giving it for Christmas, filled with other geo-realted items to my caching/life partner.

 

My question is, in my haste, I didn't think through whether to get a plastic or metal one. Is there a big difference, for the long term health of the cache?

 

We live in Virginia, USA. Temperatures range from 9F - 95F, and humidity is often above 50%, if that information helps.

 

Honestly, I've never paid too much attention to the type of ammo cans we find, and it wasn't until my dad asked me this morning whether it was plastic or metal, that I even considered it.

 

Thank you in advance for any input!

 

I'll be the first to sort of defend Plano ammo boxes. If it has to be plastic, they seem to be the best ones out there. For example, you could buy a brandless one from Harbor Freight Tools. I've only found 5 or 6 plastic ammo boxes over the years, with the last one being about 2 months ago. I think we're going to start seeing a lot more of them, since the price of military surplus ammo boxes have been sort of outrageous for years. When I started, you could get them for $4 online, or under $10 at your local Army Surplus store.

 

There is no denying welded sheet metal military surplus ammo cans with mil spec gasketing are not far superior to Plano plastic ammo cans though.

Link to comment

I would also recommend a metal military surplus ammo can...they are the gold standard of cache containers.

-snip-

That said, in the right location... -snip-

CJ reminded me that I found a no-gasket huge fishing-tackle box once in a cave (placed in '05, found in '10).

It was dry and packed fulla books!

Looking at it now, everything seemed good until we notice pics showing the container no longer in the same spot.

So yeah, as Chief said, in the right location...

Link to comment

The plastic ammo cans I have feature a rubber seal on the lid, just like the metal ones. If a Tupperware container can survive in the wild, I'm not sure why a plastic ammo can with a rubber sealed lid can't...

 

I haven't put any of my plastic ones out yet due to lack of a good location, but as soon as I find some good areas I will be placing them.

Link to comment

The plastic ammo cans I have feature a rubber seal on the lid, just like the metal ones. If a Tupperware container can survive in the wild, I'm not sure why a plastic ammo can with a rubber sealed lid can't...

 

I haven't put any of my plastic ones out yet due to lack of a good location, but as soon as I find some good areas I will be placing them.

 

Not saying they all suck. It's just that Lock and Locks are better than Tupperware- just like real ammo cans are better than plastic ones. In the end it doesn't matter why one particular container is better or worse, it just matters (hopefully) that its better. These aren't made up, it's based on the experiences of people. These people, and myself, have found these types of caches. If you don't believe it try it for yourself- yes there are bad ammo cans made of metal, I haven't found one, but they're there. But there are more good ones, than there are more good plastic ones. By all means try them for yourself. You might be right, and it may last 5 years. But it may also only last 5 days- just don't be surprised if it does happen.

Link to comment

The plastic ammo cans I have feature a rubber seal on the lid, just like the metal ones. If a Tupperware container can survive in the wild, I'm not sure why a plastic ammo can with a rubber sealed lid can't...

 

I haven't put any of my plastic ones out yet due to lack of a good location, but as soon as I find some good areas I will be placing them.

 

Not saying they all suck. It's just that Lock and Locks are better than Tupperware- just like real ammo cans are better than plastic ones. In the end it doesn't matter why one particular container is better or worse, it just matters (hopefully) that its better. These aren't made up, it's based on the experiences of people. These people, and myself, have found these types of caches. If you don't believe it try it for yourself- yes there are bad ammo cans made of metal, I haven't found one, but they're there. But there are more good ones, than there are more good plastic ones. By all means try them for yourself. You might be right, and it may last 5 years. But it may also only last 5 days- just don't be surprised if it does happen.

 

Perfect example comparing Tupperware to Lock-n-Lock's versus plastic ammo boxes to military surplus. The plastic ones are indeed gasketed. They're not total garbage regular sized containers like metal coffee cans with the cheesy plastic lids, or cookie tins. :P

Link to comment

The plastic ammo cans I have feature a rubber seal on the lid, just like the metal ones. If a Tupperware container can survive in the wild, I'm not sure why a plastic ammo can with a rubber sealed lid can't...

 

I haven't put any of my plastic ones out yet due to lack of a good location, but as soon as I find some good areas I will be placing them.

 

Not saying they all suck. It's just that Lock and Locks are better than Tupperware- just like real ammo cans are better than plastic ones. In the end it doesn't matter why one particular container is better or worse, it just matters (hopefully) that its better. These aren't made up, it's based on the experiences of people. These people, and myself, have found these types of caches. If you don't believe it try it for yourself- yes there are bad ammo cans made of metal, I haven't found one, but they're there. But there are more good ones, than there are more good plastic ones. By all means try them for yourself. You might be right, and it may last 5 years. But it may also only last 5 days- just don't be surprised if it does happen.

 

Perfect example comparing Tupperware to Lock-n-Lock's versus plastic ammo boxes to military surplus. The plastic ones are indeed gasketed. They're not total garbage regular sized containers like metal coffee cans with the cheesy plastic lids, or cookie tins. :P

Someone's still finding Tupperware in '14?

We haven't seen any since '09.

Link to comment

I would also recommend a metal military surplus ammo can...they are the gold standard of cache containers.

-snip-

That said, in the right location... -snip-

CJ reminded me that I found a no-gasket huge fishing-tackle box once in a cave (placed in '05, found in '10).

It was dry and packed fulla books!

Looking at it now, everything seemed good until we notice pics showing the container no longer in the same spot.

So yeah, as Chief said, in the right location...

 

I also recently found a cache that was in an ordinary, cheap, non-gasketed fishing tackle box that has been in place for several years and was perfectly intact and dry inside. It was under the front porch of the gift shop of a plantation house not far from here and thus well protected from the weather. So like I said, with the right location...

Link to comment

Great comparison with the tupperware, thanks! We've found plenty of those around here, and they actually hold up fine, and some are several years old. There have been a couple of metal ones we've found that have been beyond disgusting inside, like watery mush. So guess we'll just make the location good, hopefully protected a bit, and see how it goes. Being our first, it shouldn't be hard to keep up with. I checked with a local surplus shop, and they have plenty for $19, and craigslist has some for as little as $8, so, next time we'll go that route.

 

Thanks for all the opinions, they're appreciated!

Link to comment

If you get a craigslist ammo can, check it well before buying. Even some of the surplus cans don't shut/seal very well. If it doesn't seal, then it'll let water in even if it's a metal can.

 

I had a plastic Cabellas ammo can hanging in a tree for a couple of years. It stayed dry inside (big bushy evergreen tree so there was some protection from the elements there, but not much). It was definitely not a water tight container but it was water resistant enough to survive where I had it.

Link to comment

Hi CheetahSpots!! :D ::waving:: I've never heard of a plastic ammo can. But I sure love the regular ammo cans. They hold up soooo well! When I checked on my archived cache, the can had shifted a bit but all the contents inside were dry as a bone and in perfect shape as the last time I checked and it had been like 2 years. I think ammo cans are the top of the line water proof container. My second choice is the BRAND Lock 'n' Lock containers. They have great seals too. Almost anything else I've seen get wet. You really need to have a gasket type seal. Will be looking forward to your first cache. :-) --PAK

Link to comment

I honestly use Army surplus metal ammo cans for most of my hides that don't require an uncommon container and they work awesome. Stay dry and I have to say finding an ammo can always is a little more fun than an old coffee can or old, soggy prescription pill bottle that got listed as a small.

Link to comment

I won't profess to have the market cornered on finding plastic or metal ammo cans. But I can think of several plastic ones I've found that were wet inside, even though they hadn't been hidden outside that long. Whereas I can think of two metal ammo cans offhand that were wet inside. One had a bad rubber gasket that got singed after a forest fire and wouldn't seal properly. The other...OK, it wasn't wet yet, but it was going to be, as it was slightly more than singed:

 

3fc56331-a8db-4bbf-8281-87a9c13657c7.jpg

 

Even this very rusty ammo can was dry, at least when we found it. Though apparently it rusted to the point of leaking a couple years later.

 

427c0879-262a-46f2-9d79-2fd70b87e327.jpg

Edited by hzoi
Link to comment

I was at a Harbor Freight the other day and they had a big pile of their plastic ammo boxes for about $5. http://www.harborfreight.com/ammo-box-61451.html

 

I looked at them closely, and though they had a seal in the lid, it looked like it didn't compress well on the hinge end. So I pulled a piece of paper out of my pocket, closed the lid on it toward the hinge and pulled. It pulled out with no resistance, telling me the lid seal wasn't contacting the box. Unless you would be placing one of these in a protected environment, I wouldn't use them.

 

On the other hand, I have a 50 cal metal ammo can next to a stream that floods with some regularity. I secured it to a tree with a sturdy rope. It had survived several serious floods without even a drop of water getting in.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 0
×
×
  • Create New...