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Which is better to use a garmin etrex 10 or my galaxy note 2 for geocaching and why the one over the other? Thanks in advance!

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The difference is more-so the user, not the equipment.

 

Some use a GPSr well while others don't.

Some use a phone well while others don't.

 

Your phone will display good mapping, your eTrex (that model) doesn't.

Your eTrex usually bounces off rocks and keeps on tickin'... try that with your phone!

Battery life is usually much better with a dedicated unit, and they are easily changed when depleted... not so-much so with a phone.

Edited by Gitchee-Gummee

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I vastly prefer caching with a GPS but with the choices you give I might have to go with the Phone because the 10 is a bottom of the line unit that I don't even think has mapping.

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The android app's are much moderner, especially the 10 is a huge step back in time.

The note 2 is not so bright in full sunlight.

 

The 10 has no Sd, hard to put a (very small) map on, let alone paperless geocaching

It's like comparing 2 to 9, where 9 is the Note. ;-)

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Which is better to use a garmin etrex 10 or my galaxy note 2 for geocaching and why the one over the other? Thanks in advance!

 

What type of caching?

 

Day out in the wilds, middle of nowhere? GPS.

 

In the town, got 20 minutes spare before I need to be somewhere? Phone.

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Which is better to use a garmin etrex 10 or my galaxy note 2 for geocaching and why the one over the other? Thanks in advance!

Scenario:

You're caching with both your phone and your GPS. You drop the GPS in a stream, quickly grabbing it back out. Can you still make a phone call??

 

Try the above scenario only drop your phone. The answer to the question changes.

 

Which is less expensive to replace?

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Etrex 10 - much more rugged, much easier to see in the daytime, easy to replace batteries on the fly, doesn't mind getting wet

Disadvantages - you have to preload caches, only can hold a certain amount, very limited mapping, b&w screen

 

Phone - If you got internet coverage, you don't have to preload any caches. full color screen, can log online in the field.

Disadvantages - nowhere near as rugged, can be poor to see in direct sunlight, useless in remote areas without internet unless you preload caches. Of course, if you are hopping in your car going from cache to cache, you can just recharge your phone while driving.

 

With me, it does seem the GPS is more accurate in the woods then my phone.

 

As someone else said, rural distant areas Etrex 10 is better, urban areas Cellphone is better.

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Yawn....you can do any, and ALL caching with your phone.

 

Don't listen to the naysayers

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Yawn....you can do any, and ALL caching with your phone.

 

Don't listen to the naysayers

Nobody is saying you can't cache with a phone. They are pointing out some obvious differences.

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Yawn....you can do any, and ALL caching with your phone.

 

Don't listen to the naysayers

I have cached many places where my phone displays "Searching for System". Unless you preloaded the caches your going to be saying "I wish I had a GPS". And what about battery life. My eTrex can go for two days of 12 hour days on ene set.

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My iPhone lasts about as long as my Garmin 62s unless I'm facebooking and texting at the same time.

I have plenty or caches already saved offline-several thousand even. I update them frequently. Usually once a week

 

I've only "wished" for a GPS when I wanted to see NWTrails. Other than than...I've NEVER said it.

 

I still haven't seen a cache I couldn't find with my iPhone. Still....

 

 

Carry on with the smartphone hate. It's so yesterday, but please, by all means, carry on...

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Yawn....you can do any, and ALL caching with your phone.

 

Don't listen to the naysayers

 

You can. And you can also do all your caching with gpsr. Or combine the two.

 

As for me, I generally use the phone. My phone searches for caches, displays trails, gives me voice routing, exports gpx files, has offline mapping, a great html display, and takes better pictures than any gpsr I have seen.

 

But my gpsr has been underwater at least three times while kayak-caching and not once did I wish that I had been using my phone instead. I prefer mounting the gpsr on a bike rather the phone. Sometimes hiking with a gpsr can be fun, and I generally use it if I want to record my tracks or do an elevation plot.

 

The Etrex 10 is a basic unit and you might think of going up a little from there - the phone can handle some of the things that the 10 might not do as well. But if you find yourself wanting something other than a phone, it might be time to think about alternatives. If the phone meets all your needs, there is no reason to have anything else.

Edited by geodarts

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Carry on with the smartphone hate. It's so yesterday, but please, by all means, carry on...

 

I don't think its about hate but about preference.

I've cached with my 5S and my GPS units and much prefer my GPS units as the compass is smoother and I find its gets me to GZ faster especially under canopy.

The real deal killer is in bright sunlight I can't see the screen on the phone. I had it with me on the trail the other day not to cache with but to put a bid in on Ebay.....I couldn't see the screen and operate the phone adequately to get the bid in, almost threw the phone in the lake.

I do like having the phone in the truck ( where I can see the screen ) for up to date cache info.

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Which is better to use a garmin etrex 10 or my galaxy note 2 for geocaching and why the one over the other? Thanks in advance!

Scenario:

You're caching with both your phone and your GPS. You drop the GPS in a stream, quickly grabbing it back out. Can you still make a phone call??

 

Try the above scenario only drop your phone. The answer to the question changes.

 

Which is less expensive to replace?

 

Phone is inside a Lifeproof case. Answer no longer changes.

Hell I use my iPhone for underwater photography from time to time.

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I don't think its about hate but about preference.

I've cached with my 5S and my GPS units and much prefer my GPS units as the compass is smoother and I find its gets me to GZ faster especially under canopy.

The real deal killer is in bright sunlight I can't see the screen on the phone.

 

Agree fully. Nothing wrong in folks wanting to use a phone, I simply prefer my GPS in the same way I prefer to drive my car rather than my wife's :D

Edited by sussamb

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I have cached with (in order), Etrex Legend, Nuvi 1390 (worked quite well thank you!), and an Oregon 550.

I now cache with a Samsung Galaxy Note II using the c:geo app. I only use the compass on occasion as this app displays both destination and current Lat/Long on the same page which the Oregon does not.

c:geo app uses geocaching.com data and works well offline and the Oregon now is on the shelf most of the time...

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Ok, lots of discussion about what to use. Im new to caching and have been thinking about getting a gps as I loose signal or internet and then struggle to locate gz. However reading this chat, maybe I need more info on caching first. Saving cache info before I leave, sounds good. Im not good at techno perhaps the idiots guide to geocaching would be better start. It has been a frustrating begining, but determined to crack the gps / location help with phone or other device. Just want to be able to actually locate the place the cache is hidden ¤ maybe I need a caching lesson!!! :-)

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Which is better to use a garmin etrex 10 or my galaxy note 2 for geocaching and why the one over the other? Thanks in advance!

 

My husband and I have only just started caching on our own. My Uncle and Aunty from England introduced us to it while they were over on holiday and we were hooked! We have an Etrex 10 too (we didn't want to start with one of the more technical ones until we got used to the 10 because GPS's are new to us) and a Galaxy Note 3. We sort of use both of them at the moment... the phone is awesome for the mapping, taking us to the cache spot and choosing which one to look for next and the GPS is great for getting right up to the cache. We're only beginner's though so this may change in the next couple of months :)

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Yawn....you can do any, and ALL caching with your phone.

 

Don't listen to the naysayers

*sigh* It was bound to happen :P

 

Which is better to use a garmin etrex 10 or my galaxy note 2 for geocaching and why the one over the other? Thanks in advance!

Scenario:

You're caching with both your phone and your GPS. You drop the GPS in a stream, quickly grabbing it back out. Can you still make a phone call??

 

Try the above scenario only drop your phone. The answer to the question changes.

 

Which is less expensive to replace?

 

Phone is inside a Lifeproof case. Answer no longer changes.

Hell I use my iPhone for underwater photography from time to time.

Ditto. Well, not the photography at least. And I don't have a protective case :P But I still use it exclusively, everywhere I cache. No problems.

 

Here's the rundown, based on above-average devices only:

 

* Barebones? Out of the box?

GPSr is more capable - on the points of battery life, ruggedness, accuracy, etc - points specific to what the device does (and should do) best, being a dedicated GPS device.

 

* After preparation? Equipping for the style of geocaching you prefer?

Smartphone is far more versatile and capable, providing more features and connectivity as a multi-purpose device, usable more than sufficiently within ANY environment

(However a dedicated GPSr should always have the best GPS technology, else "dedicated GPS device" has lost all meaning)

 

If you're a beginner with money? GSPr (and a bit of learning to use it properly)

 

If you're a beginner with a (recent) smartphone? Smartphone. (and a bit of learning to use it properly)

 

I'll say again - I cached over a year with an iPhone 3GS, used in the desert with a group of non-cachers and being the only gps device (risky!) still had no problem finding caches; used in forest, over water, in urban cores, no problem.

For the most part, it's not the device, it's how you use it.

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I use my phone for any urban caching. It is simpler. I use a dedicated handheld for any activities away from the car (hiking, skiing, biking, etc..) type caching. It is not worth the effort (to me) to protect the phone from damage and bring along enough equipment to allow the battery to last a full day when hiking.

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It is not worth the effort (to me) to protect the phone from damage and bring along enough equipment to allow the battery to last a full day when hiking.

 

heh,. 'enough equipment' being... a little battery pack that takes AA's. And a few AA's. Presuming you're not near an outlet or a car for enough time to deplete an entire phone battery caching... Plus, smartphone batteries are different now wherein most (afiak) have a better life if used and charged regularly and repeatedly without depletion.

I've rarely ever been away from power long enough to even warrant using my external power source. And that's usually during day-long powertrail hikes with no vehicle breaks. And that's not often.

Plus the fact that a AA pack makes sharing power with other devices (just as if you had a gpsr) highly efficient. And cheap.

 

Anyone going on an extended power-less trip should be prepared with extra batteries anyway - even GPSr owners. (I've not met one who doesn't carry a few extra batteries, let alone who's never run out of battery power during one of those lengthy type trips)

 

The issue of 'battery life' really is, for the most part, for most people, extremely overblown.

 

(I'm even defending Android phones =P lol)

Edited by thebruce0

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To ME, it is.... Days out are 8 to 16 hours and trips up to 10 days... In driving rain and snow with no cell coverage. To ME, it is not worth the hassle. The handheld just clips to my pack and does not mind any weather or being dropped and covered in mud and will happily run all day without looking at the batteries.

 

With the phone, it needs a serious case and is then hard to use and with the GPS on and tracking full time, three hours maybe battery life. It offers really no advantage in the wilderness and provide more hassle. When doing stuff based from the car, the phone works great especially if there is cell coverage.

 

This is MY PERSONAL OPINION....

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... I didn't say you were wrong, Red90. It may well be (for you). I just answered how I deal with those concerns. I'll be of the first to repeatedly say to use what works for you. I simply respond with how I (and others) deal with common concerns. Those solutions may or may not work (for you), but at least they're out there for others to whom they are beneficial.

Use what you like. Matters not to me! ;)

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... I didn't say you were wrong, Red90. It may well be (for you). I just answered how I deal with those concerns. I'll be of the first to repeatedly say to use what works for you. I simply respond with how I (and others) deal with common concerns. Those solutions may or may not work (for you), but at least they're out there for others to whom they are beneficial.

Use what you like. Matters not to me! ;)

 

I'll chime in on this part. Really these GPS or Phone CHOOSE ONE type discussions are a little silly anyway. It's like the old "would you rather be stuck on an island without a canoe or stuck in a canoe with no sight of land" type discussions.

I use a smartphone (iPhone 5s), a tablet (iPad Mini LTE) and a Garmin eTrex 30 for caching AND for backcountry travel. I like the iPhone for urban caching a lot - I don't have to go through the effort of firing up the laptop, downloading caches to GSAK, exporting the caches to the GPS before I run out and play. When I'm in the backcountry though, I am travelling 8-10 hours a day in areas with little cellular coverage. Powering that iPhone display takes a lot of juice, as does the GPS function.... yes I can mitigate that, and I have the ability to charge all my toys - phone, iPad, GPS - using a solar kit that I own and bring. Still though, the eTrex gets the mount on the thwart of my canoe because two AA batteries will provide navigation for about three days of travel for me. When you're portaging the batteries that sort of thing matters. I still have the iPad on the trip as I can read books on it and well hey looking at a digital topo map (at base camp) on a 7.9" screen is just more pleasant.

 

The answer for the geocacher in 2014 is not to choose "GPS or Phone". Let's be honest here, the question is not relevant in most areas that the question is even being asked your average high activity player in a G8 nation has both. The people that can't afford both know exactly what they are going to buy - either a smartphone with a data plan makes sense (for more than just geocaching) (they likely bought this before they learned about this game) or if the hypothetical person benefits more from a single rugged device without a monthly fee they are buying a GPS.

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Indeed. "or" was never intended to be an exclusive 'or'... merely implied to be mean "use what you like". And as mentioned, out of the box the GPS is more capable in all the features it contains, while a smartphone has more features. Neither is overall 'better' or 'worse', just stronger in certain contexts; and those strengths and weakness (for both classes) can obviously change depending on how much effort you expend to mitigate those weaknesses.

So what's your context? Use what works for you best. It's not a competition, despite how many people treat it :laughing:

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I use my phone for any urban caching. It is simpler. I use a dedicated handheld for any activities away from the car (hiking, skiing, biking, etc..) type caching. It is not worth the effort (to me) to protect the phone from damage and bring along enough equipment to allow the battery to last a full day when hiking.

I'm not for a moment suggesting that you're 'doing it wrong', here's how I handle this issue.

 

It's been a very long time since I've been all-day hiking, but my family does go to Disney World fairly frequently and with the recent changes to how they administer fastpasses and other things, smartphones in the parks have become a necessity, in my opnion. Also, I have active preschoolers who access my phone from time to time. As such, it is not that uncommon for my phone to be tossed at something hard.

 

I mitigate damage to my phone by keeping it in otterbox case. It doesn't make my phone as waterproof and damage-resistant as my Venture, but it gives it reasonable protection.

 

In order to ensure all-day power for my iphone, I include an external battery pack in our 'park bag'. Mine has a 12000mAh battery that will charge my phone at least half a dozen times. It will also charge any other USB-powered device.

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Which is better to use a garmin etrex 10 or my galaxy note 2 for geocaching and why the one over the other? Thanks in advance!

 

Which one is waterproof and more like to last longer than one day beyond it's warranty?

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i would love to know if i should get a dedicated gps or stay w/ note 3 -

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Over the last couple of months I've had a good opportunity to compare my smartphone to my GPS receiver while seeking caches. Accuracy-wise they both were comparable. At times, each device would have a one or two foot difference between each other but otherwise the same. My Moto G's screen was tough to read in sunlight and the battery drains much faster than my eTrex30. I wasn't too worried about the phone's safety, however, because it was nicely tucked away in an Otterbox defender case. I prefer my GPS device over my phone mainly for it's longer lasting batteries and it's easier to read screen (for these senior's eyes, lol). Hanging it on a lanyard around my neck while in pursuit is more comfortable for me, as well. Lastly, I think I'd rather relay on my GPSr for a location fix while deep into the Alberta Badlands than my smartphone. Just my opinions.

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Nobody can answer this for you..... It depends on YOU & your style of geocaching.

 

The fact that you've come to this forum to 'question' either method, only means that you are looking for something better.

 

But what is that?? We can't tell you..... You never mentioned what you are using now.

 

1) DO NOT buy a smart phone strictly for geocaching. Smart Phones are expensive. So - unless you can use a smart phone for everything else it has to offer for the $$ ...... its not worth it. A handheld GPS is cheaper.

 

2) If you're using a smartphone currently and want a different experience....buy a handheld GPS. For the most part...You'll praise the battery life, you'll praise being able to find caches in remote areas (without cell signal) and you'll praise the ability to keep your cell phone in your pocket DRY & PROTECTED. Dropping a cell phone in a creek can be expensive to replace!!!

 

3) If you buy a handheld...and don't like it. Guess what? You can sell it.

 

4) Having a handheld GPS requires a little bit of tech savi-ness. Tech savy to load geocaches in it. Premiumm membership costs $30 a year so you can create pocket queries.....which can load 1000 geocaches at time. You need tech-saviness to generate logs in the GPS and transfer them into the website. If you're not tech savy...and not willing to learn.... a handheld GPS is probably not for you.

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Couple comments...

you'll praise being able to find caches in remote areas (without cell signal)

Irrelevant for smartphones with GPS (most any smartphone on the market). Again, a cell signal is not required to use smartphone gps.

 

Having a handheld GPS requires a little bit of tech savi-ness.

To make good use of your smartphone for geocaching, I would say also; if not more.

 

Tech savy to load geocaches in it. Premiumm membership costs $30 a year so you can create pocket queries.....which can load 1000 geocaches at time.

Irrelevant and also applies for smartphones.

 

You need tech-saviness to generate logs in the GPS and transfer them into the website. If you're not tech savy...and not willing to learn.... a handheld GPS is probably not for you.

Ok, we can agree on that :laughing:

 

There's a learning curve for any device, and if you want to make use of your device really well then having an edge of tech-savvy will always be helpful, regardless of device. Smartphones, as they can make use of the API (depending on the app you use - which can dramatically alter your geocaching experience regardless of phone brand) help make PQ and the cache loading process almost obsolete. Almost. (PQs still have their place, even in apps that can search and load via API).

 

Otherwise, generally agreed with the rest of your comment :)

 

Especially:

Nobody can answer this for you..... It depends on YOU & your style of geocaching.
Edited by thebruce0

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Which is better to use a garmin etrex 10 or my galaxy note 2 for geocaching and why the one over the other? Thanks in advance!

 

What type of caching?

 

Day out in the wilds, middle of nowhere? GPS.

 

In the town, got 20 minutes spare before I need to be somewhere? Phone.

 

This is exactly what I find myself doing. Or, if the GZ is bouncy on my phone? My 62s nails it right down. Although I'm thinking of going with a Monterra VERY SOON

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Whatever the choice -- please don't use either a purpose built GPS or a phone to place caches without proper waypoint averaging. Taking a quick snapshot of the coordinates isn't considered best practice. And unless something has changed, I haven't run across a single phone app that does this -- not even the 'official' gc.com app.

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Whatever the choice -- please don't use either a purpose built GPS or a phone to place caches without proper waypoint averaging. Taking a quick snapshot of the coordinates isn't considered best practice. And unless something has changed, I haven't run across a single phone app that does this -- not even the 'official' gc.com app.

 

For iPhone / iPad:

 

GPS Averaging by Looking4cache

 

Perfect Mark by mellene.com (USA only at the moment, used to be international though)

 

 

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Good to hear there are some 3rd party apps that have begun to take this seriously,. Shame gc.com doesn't.

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It should be noted that some people have laid out very good arguments for 'averaging' to not be the magic solution that people want it to be. A search will no doubt turn up these discussions.

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Without detailed technical knowledge about smartphone GPS, as far as my knowledge, averaging is less a necessity for smartphones, especially if they make use of assisted GPS. Triangulation is sped up with cell towers which greatly boosts the time in which it takes the device to narrow down GPS location with the satellites, and continually helps to provide an accurate location. Devices that just use GPS satellites wouldn't have anything else to go on, so averaging over time is helpful. Of course averaging is always helpful, but when other methods are simultaneously employed, it becomes less a necessity. I believe that's why for the most part smartphones apps don't do averaging themselves (but specially designed apps do) as it can also be a significant battery drain for little gain in most areas - since the GPS accuracy is calculated on the OS level with whatever technologies the hardware provides (like aGPS), and reports the resulting accuracy estimate to the app.

my 2p

 

ETA: ie an app that does gps averaging is like telling the OS "I don't trust your high-level GPS calculation with direct access too all your hardware, so I'm going double-check your results... and drain your battery" ;)

Edited by thebruce0

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Triangulation is sped up with cell towers which greatly boosts the time in which it takes the device to narrow down GPS location with the satellites, and continually helps to provide an accurate location.

 

First part is correct (assuming by boost you mean reduce), second part isn't. While A-GPS assists with the initial fix accuracy is generally far better from the GPS receiver in a smart phone than any data it gets from cell towers.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assisted_GPS

Edited by sussamb

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While averaging is no magic solution, it usually produces better results than a quick snapshot of current location on any device. Preferred is to take more than one average at different times to help negate some of the DOP issues than can occur for various reasons.

 

AGPS can improve the time it takes to get a fix by providing quicker almanac data (MSA) but that isn't relevant to the issue at hand, and can help with location in some situations in a fashion similar to WAAS/EGNOS by providing local correction data (MSB) unique to the cell site location, but is not a solution for all DOP issues, and should not be depended upon for snapshot readings any more than a purpose built handheld should be. The best contribution of AGPS vs. the topic at hand appears to be in urban canyons where multipath becomes a big problem.

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Triangulation is sped up with cell towers which greatly boosts the time in which it takes the device to narrow down GPS location with the satellites, and continually helps to provide an accurate location.

First part is correct (assuming by boost you mean reduce), second part isn't. While A-GPS assists with the initial fix accuracy is generally far better from the GPS receiver in a smart phone than any data it gets from cell towers.

Yes. I wasn't implying the AGPS was more accurate than GPS. It most certainly isn't. But it remains active while the GPS is on; such as if satellite reception is gone, AGPS will still keep the reading in a feasible location.

 

While averaging is no magic solution, it usually produces better results than a quick snapshot of current location on any device.

Yes. And this applies to any device. No one should ever just turn on gps and take a reading. Whether actively averaging the readings your device tells you, or if your device automatically averages, or uses other methods to hone its accuracy, you should always wait for a bit to let the gps 'settle down', as it were.

 

[AGPS] is not a solution for all DOP issues, and should not be depended upon for snapshot readings any more than a purpose built handheld should be.

No one should ever take snapshot readings and presume they're accurate :P

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Triangulation is sped up with cell towers which greatly boosts the time in which it takes the device to narrow down GPS location with the satellites, and continually helps to provide an accurate location.

 

First part is correct (assuming by boost you mean reduce), second part isn't. While A-GPS assists with the initial fix accuracy is generally far better from the GPS receiver in a smart phone than any data it gets from cell towers.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assisted_GPS

A handheld GPS has no better accuracy than a phone. The one thing it may have is better sencitivity (only GPSrs with a High Sencitivity GPS chip). This allows to maintain a lock while under heavy tree cover. All the other issues with smartphones are easyly overcome. This is really the only BIG advantage. (actualy, a smartphone can use an external bluetooth GPS puck to get better accuracy and sencitivity than a handheld GPS)

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Triangulation is sped up with cell towers which greatly boosts the time in which it takes the device to narrow down GPS location with the satellites, and continually helps to provide an accurate location.

 

First part is correct (assuming by boost you mean reduce), second part isn't. While A-GPS assists with the initial fix accuracy is generally far better from the GPS receiver in a smart phone than any data it gets from cell towers.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assisted_GPS

A handheld GPS has no better accuracy than a phone. The one thing it may have is better sencitivity (only GPSrs with a High Sencitivity GPS chip). This allows to maintain a lock while under heavy tree cover. All the other issues with smartphones are easyly overcome. This is really the only BIG advantage. (actualy, a smartphone can use an external bluetooth GPS puck to get better accuracy and sencitivity than a handheld GPS)

 

Under tree canopy the phone is at its worst locating GZ but its screen is at its best....you can see it.

Out in the sun the sensitivity improves but you can't see the screen. IMO most phones are about useless on the trail as GPS devices unless you want to go blind....I'm told there are now some viewable in bright sun but the majority have a long way to go.

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Triangulation is sped up with cell towers which greatly boosts the time in which it takes the device to narrow down GPS location with the satellites, and continually helps to provide an accurate location.

 

First part is correct (assuming by boost you mean reduce), second part isn't. While A-GPS assists with the initial fix accuracy is generally far better from the GPS receiver in a smart phone than any data it gets from cell towers.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assisted_GPS

A handheld GPS has no better accuracy than a phone. The one thing it may have is better sencitivity (only GPSrs with a High Sencitivity GPS chip). This allows to maintain a lock while under heavy tree cover. All the other issues with smartphones are easyly overcome. This is really the only BIG advantage. (actualy, a smartphone can use an external bluetooth GPS puck to get better accuracy and sencitivity than a handheld GPS)

 

I never mentioned a handheld GPS ... so let's not open that debate :)

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Under tree canopy the phone is at its worst locating GZ but its screen is at its best....you can see it.

Out in the sun the sensitivity improves but you can't see the screen. IMO most phones are about useless on the trail as GPS devices unless you want to go blind....I'm told there are now some viewable in bright sun but the majority have a long way to go.

Smartphone visibility is entirely dependent on the person viewing.

Many have absolutely no problem with screen visibility, or may have an accessory to help with it.

Of course many do have problems with it. So, it's not a universal problem when comparing devices, but it's something to consider if someone is looking to compare for their own experiences. It's one of those subjective differences that aren't really an issue for many (unlike gps accuracy which is hardware-dependent factor, across the board, regardless of user)

 

I personally have never had a problem my screen's visibility (and I don't know who has; personally). But I can understand that others do have that issue, for whatever reasons. But I'd never advocate using that as a fundamental 'problem' with smartphones, rather a factor to consider after you test it yourself.

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I personally have never had a problem (with) my screen's visibility ...

 

While I always have ... :)

 

One reason (among many others) that I prefer my GPS.

Edited by sussamb

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A handheld GPS has no better accuracy than a phone.

 

In my own personal experience, having two handheld GPS's and 2 different smart phones - The handheld GPS's have always been more accurate.

 

What handheld GPS do you use?

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