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No cellphone


Jamie Z
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In reading these boards, I've read countless times the importance and popularity of carrying a cellphone or radio into the wilderness in case of emergency.

 

Certainly that's the smart thing to do. But what about those of us who don't want a safety net all the time? Sometimes I like to cut off my connection from society.

 

I accept that if something were to happen, I'm on my own... but to me, that's a positive. There are times when I don't want easy access to a helping hand.

 

Are there others out there like me? Do you like to leave the phone or radio at home and depend on yourself?

 

I can't be the only one.... but I seem to be when I talk to friends or read these forums.

 

Jamie

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I dont own one, probably never will! Even though I appreciate new technology, to me a cell phone is just a nuisance.

 

Now when I get my truck stuck in a big mud hole out in the middle of nowhere Ill probably change my mind, but it hasnt happened yet!

 

C-Troop

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I am new to geocaching, but have spent many hours in the woods in my area (Maine) on my ATV and foot alone and I do not have a cell phone. I have had near misses with moose, deer, bear, coyotes, and even an ornery old beaver once. I have also had the normal slips, falls, sprained ankles, etc., both on foot and on my ATV. It probably is not the smartest thing to do, but there is nothing like the feeling of being out in the middle of nowhere all alone. It does help in this state that we have no poisonous animals and it's hard to be more than a mile from water at any given point in the state. In reality, is going out alone putting yourself in danger anymore than say, skydiving, bungee jumping, or other similar sports?

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quote:
Originally posted by Jamie Z:

In reading these boards, I've read countless times the importance and popularity of carrying a cellphone or radio into the wilderness in case of emergency.

 

Certainly that's the smart thing to do. But what about those of us who don't want a safety net all the time? Sometimes I like to cut off my connection from society.

 

I accept that if something were to happen, I'm on my own... but to me, that's a positive. There are times when I don't want easy access to a helping hand.

 

Are there others out there like me? Do you like to leave the phone or radio at home and depend on yourself?

 

I can't be the only one.... but I seem to be when I talk to friends or read these forums.

 

Jamie


 

I'm very familiar with the feeling of independence I derive from knowing I used only my own resources to cope with nature, the elements, and unexpected events. That atavism may kill some of us, but hey! who wants to tell a weak story, when your own full blown disaster can be the benchmark against which others compare their boring lives. I will always remember my Dad telling his story about being charged by a Grizzly Bear. Now THAT'S always interesting!

 

Why do you think so many people run with the Bulls in Pamplona every July

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Well, I for one do carry a cell phone, a gps, and a pda when I head out. Most of where I go the cell phone isn't worth a darn. So it's not realiable, don't depend on it. One case where it came in usefull. We were 7 miles from the nearest road, the woods filled with smoke. We knew there was a forest fire someplace, but not where. I found a high point where I could call the ranger district and find out where the fire was. Far enough away to not be a problem. If I hadn't been able to make the call, I would have packed up and went up the mountain and gotten above the timberline. So all it did was keep me from doing that.

 

GPS .. Nice gadget. Wouldn't bet my life on it working when I really needed it. Learn to us a map and compass. Not batteries or electronics to break.

 

PDA .. Saves me for carrying books to read. Just have them electronicly. No books, guess I'll just have to do something besides read in bed.

 

I've been backpacking and hiking for more years than I care to admit. These things weren't even dreamed of when I started. I had to learn how to survive without the electronic gadgets and will not rely on them now.

 

Ok that's my rant or soap box stuff for today.

 

Byron

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I'm with you Jamie!

 

Until I read about safety nets on this board I did all my caching by myself, telling nobody where I was, and having no method of communication to anyone. I never even considered anything else. I wouldn't own a cell phone if it were given to me for free, I dispise them!

 

I don't bother people with giving them my itinery since I have never followed my original plan when geocaching anyways. I guess its the unknown, the possibility of some low-level danger and the unplanned adventure of the whole caching experience that is most attractive to me.

 

Recently, I began occasionally caching with others. But, for the companionship and not for safety reasons. However, safety is a nice plus when you have someone else there.

 

All that being said. There were 2 situations I found myself in that could of got me in trouble if I made a wrong move, especially since I was on my own. I just remembered the circumstances I was in and either didn't take the risk or was VERY careful in taking it.

 

If you use your head, there are very few things out there that could hurt you.

 

Smoochnme

 

goldfish.gif

"When your learning to take, the path at your pace...

 

Every road is worth your while"

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I've got 2 kids and a pregnant wife and a few other people who also depend on me for one thing or another. For their sake I carry a cellphone at all times.

 

For my sake I don't always answer it.

 

Bret

 

"The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field.

When a man found it, he hid it again."

Mt. 13:44

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quote:
Originally posted by Jamie Z:

 

Certainly that's the smart thing to do.

. . .

Do you like to leave the phone or radio at home and depend on yourself?


I depend on myself to be smart enough to bring a cell phone. icon_smile.gif

 

I guess this is just a matter of picking your challenges.

 

Some people sky dive, some free climb, you go into ther woods without a cell phone. Cool. icon_cool.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by Jamie Z:

 

Certainly that's the smart thing to do.

. . .

Do you like to leave the phone or radio at home and depend on yourself?


I depend on myself to be smart enough to bring a cell phone. icon_smile.gif

 

I guess this is just a matter of picking your challenges.

 

Some people sky dive, some free climb, you go into ther woods without a cell phone. Cool. icon_cool.gif

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Personally, I don't use one. I don't like to drag them around. My cache pack is usually heavy enough without having that added to it(GPS, first aid kit, compass, camera, batteries, goodies, snack, water, etc...)My hubby takes his almost everywhere, but even on the 1/1 caches we don't get a good signal because we live in a rolling hills and mountainous type of area and the service is just not that great. I don't know why he bothers carrying it at all most of the time, but hey, it's no extra weight in my pack!

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I know people who hunt with bows because a rifle isn't sporting. The way I see it, if you really needed to hunt to eat, you would use a rifle. It's the best tool for the job. Cell Phones, PDA, GPS's, and our Rigs are all just tools. They are about as smart as the operator. If the thrill of being cellphoneless and living on the edge turns your crank, lucky you. Other people have to skydive, bungie jump, and freebase to get the same thrill.

 

Still, no matter how you slice it it is better to take a cell phone than not. If you don't have a cell phone, a CB, etc. Like carrying water in the desert. It pays to be prepaired.

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I have been packing and hiking into the wilderness for many years.. and I have a lot of self confidence in what I do and how I will take care of myself and any others that come with me.

 

This includes geocaching as well as any sport that puts you out of the general arena of contact.

 

But, years of experience not withstanding, it is, I think, an extreme level of gross foolishness NOT to include a small cellphone as a standard pack item. Ignoring your own issues, what if you found an emergency that was time critical (say an unreported fire, or that infamous 'crack in the dam'.

 

Back in the 50's it was great to send Lassie home to bring back mom or dad or 'help', but that was then and this is now. And if you are packing with others, it is definately poor planning and almost negligent on the part of all parties not to have a common phone should any of you become critically injured or disable. Even if you don't expect to be within cell service - you STILL pack one because you just never know until you need it - and then its too dadgum late.

 

Ok.. so you say that you like to commune with nature and there is no place for a ringing telephone or Julie Andrews on a mountain top - Well I agree completely with you.. And it is just because of this reason that god, in her infinite wisdom, invented not only earth, sky, and water, but also the off switch...

 

This pontification has been brought to you from California (go ahead - groan 'of course') by

 

gil..

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I suppose everyone can take what they like. But there's been an ever advancing march of equipment and technology. If one really wants to go "back to nature" why not get rid of your high tech hiking boots and dress like the 4500 year old man they found frozen in the Alps who stuffed straw in his shoes to keep warm.

 

For that matter, leave you GPS at home. Seems kinda unfair to test nature with a device that spots your location within a few feet! icon_smile.gif

 

Alan

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I suppose everyone can take what they like. But there's been an ever advancing march of equipment and technology. If one really wants to go "back to nature" why not get rid of your high tech hiking boots and dress like the 4500 year old man they found frozen in the Alps who stuffed straw in his shoes to keep warm.

 

For that matter, leave you GPS at home. Seems kinda unfair to test nature with a device that spots your location within a few feet! icon_smile.gif

 

Alan

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quote:
Originally posted by Alan2:

...there's been an ever advancing march of equipment and technology. ...get rid of your high tech hiking boots and dress like the 4500 year old man...


Alan,

 

That's strikingly similar to why I started this thread. I'm not suggesting I'm going to live without electricity and my car, or other modern devices, but there are times when I want to be away from those things.

 

When I paddled the Mississippi a couple years ago, I insisted to my paddling partner that we keep our gear moderately out-of-date. I would not allow any battery-powered devices, or any sort of modern communication gadgets (although that should be covered under my "no battery" clause).

 

We had no phone, no lights, no motor. It was us, paddles, and the river.

 

My friend relunctantly agreed to my "demands," but other people (including my friend's dad) really thought I was being foolish.

 

Sometimes when we talked to people and explained how we didn't have a radio or cellphone, they expressed astonishment. "What do you do if something happens?" they'd ask.

 

My response? "We get ourselves out if it." We prepared as best we could for possible problems, and I'd like to think that had a part to play in the fact that we had almost no problems.

 

Although my trip was greatly enhanced by my self-imposed restrictions, my friend tired of the low-tech, no safety net approach. His dad mailed us a couple of flashlights at one point, and it took quite a bit of reasoning by me to pursuade my friend to leave them unopened.

 

(excuse me if I go on a little tangent)

 

My friend also liked to have a option to back out of the trip at any point. He had arranged, prior to the trip, for his girlfriend to be ready at a moments notice to come get us if he requested. Had he executed that plan, I would not have gone home with him. I was more secure in knowing that I didn't have an "out," than I was knowing that I could quit at any time.

 

Before the canoe trip, I thought everyone thought like me. It was an eye-opener to see how much my friend wanted someone there to catch him if he slipped. My view was that we were our own back-up. We would depend on one-another.

 

Not that I think either of the viewpoints are wrong (and I will readily admit that it is safer to utilize modern technology) but I wanted to point out that there are two viewpoints.. and they don't always work well together as a team.

 

I would like, just one time, to experience the feeling of some of the very early explorers who ventured into unknown territory without the aid of maps, communication, or readily available food. Those men (and a few women) faced something that can't be replicated today, although I do what I can to try sometimes.

 

Jamie

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I don't disagree with anything you said Jamie. I kinda like the idea of challenging myself too.

 

I think the disagreement throughout the thread comes from one's purpose for geocaching.

 

If you're interest in cahllenging your and the cache is incidental, then you'd go "naked". On the other hand if you're a geocacher first and that's the main point of going into the woods, then a cell phone makes sense to take along.

 

It depends from where you stand.

 

However pone goes, just enjoy the journey.

 

icon_smile.gif

 

Alan

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I don't disagree with anything you said Jamie. I kinda like the idea of challenging myself too.

 

I think the disagreement throughout the thread comes from one's purpose for geocaching.

 

If you're interest in cahllenging your and the cache is incidental, then you'd go "naked". On the other hand if you're a geocacher first and that's the main point of going into the woods, then a cell phone makes sense to take along.

 

It depends from where you stand.

 

However pone goes, just enjoy the journey.

 

icon_smile.gif

 

Alan

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We had an old saying the the Marine Corps, "it's easy to be hard, but it is hard to be smart." Having some sort of contingency for emergencies is smart.

 

We are out there to do this for fun. Just because you take a cell phone does not mean you have to use it. Every team in the Eco-Challenge carries a GPS and a radio in a sealed bag. It is to be used in emergencies only.

 

Be a Boy Scout and be prepared.

 

Just some thoughts,

 

Scott

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I don't own a cell phone. I may give in to popular demand and buy one soon, but not because of geocaching. I side with JamieZ on this one. The only hi-tech gadget that I use is the GPSr (unless you count the car, and a light when night caching). One reason I am a geocacher is to get AWAY from technology.

 

If it is irresponsible to go outdoors without a cell phone, how did we manage to emerge alive from the woods at the state park in the '70's when I was out hiking and camping with the Boy Scouts? How did they survive in the 1870's and 1770's? Probably they just communicated by reading smoke signals at a distance. I think the company that popularized that was called "Horizon Wireless."

 

x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x

What if the Hokey Pokey IS what it's all about?

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Yeah, I'm sure your family will be just tickled when you end up dead because you were too "proud" to carry a cellphone with you when you went hiking. I almost always carry my phone, and I leave it off. Why NOT have a safety net? I guess you gotta preen and grunt with the rest of the apes, but I think we've evolved a little past that. You might try to think of someone ELSE next time you go caching.

 

Wow... I think that's my rant for the month. icon_frown.gif

 

_____________________________________________________

> Martin (Magellan 330)

Don't have time to program and record your shows while geocaching? Get a TiVo!

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quote:
Originally posted by The Leprechauns:

The only hi-tech gadget that I use is the GPSr (unless you count the car, and a light when night caching). One reason I am a geocacher is to get AWAY from technology.


I see... so you don't think the computer you're typing on is a "hi-tech gadget". icon_smile.gif And why are you using a light at night? Break out the oil-soaked torches! Come on... if you're going to get back to nature, get ALL the way back. icon_smile.gif Don't slam my crutch when you're using one yourself. icon_smile.gif

 

_____________________________________________________

> Martin (Magellan 330)

Don't have time to program and record your shows while geocaching? Get a TiVo!

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Although, I will say this. . . turn of the phones while people are trying to enjoy their meal! There is nothing more irritating than trying to enjoy a nice meal with the family and someone's phone going ring ring ring! And then, they sit there and talk loud enough for everyone in the blinking resturant to hear in on his/her conversation. If I were not afraid of being charged with assault I would go up and grab his/her phone and drop it in a picture of water.

 

Ok! Enough of me on my soap box.

 

BTW, in defense of some in here, many wilderness treks are too far from a cell to get phone service anyway. And sometimes I do navigation with just a compass or using natural indicators so I can keep up on my skills. You never know when that GPS will poopoo out on you and you don't want to be stuck.

 

Just some thoughts,

 

Scott

 

Scott

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When I hike, backpack or Geocache by myself I bring my cell phone along. Now that I'm a parent I have people who depend on me, so I think it's the responsible thing to do. I'm also aware that a cell phone isn't a panacea for everything you might encounter in the woods. In fact much of the time, I may be out of range, so I make sure that when I go out alone, I'm prepared to spend the night if I have to.

 

"Men don't stop playing because they get old, they get old because they stop playing" Oliver Wendell Holmes

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If you don't want refuse to depend on gadgets to get you out of trouble in the wilderness, at least be sure to tell someone, who isn't going, which geocaches you're going to look for.

 

People have lost their lives by becoming immobilized by an accident in the wilderness and then dying of thirst, hypothermia, or hunger.

 

I once broke my leg in the woods on a harmless looking slope and could not take one step after that. Fortunately I had lots of friends with me. If I'd been alone, lying in agony far from any road, you can believe I'd be thinking hard for many hours or days and nights about every person that might possibly imagine where I've gone and whether any of them might be able to figure it out in time.

 

If you plan to refuse to use a cell phone or radio as a safety net, perhaps it would be better remain within a day's walking distance of your home, refusing also to use a car (mechanical gadget) that could get you so far away that you won't be found.

 

Be adventurous, but be smart about it.

 

If you depend on a car to get to your adventure, you can also depend on a cell phone or other radio to get you home in case of an accident.

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quote:
Originally posted by Black Dog Trackers:

If you depend on a car to get to your adventure, you can also depend on a cell phone or other radio to get you home in case of an accident.


Well.. in the case that I mention earlier in this thread, I didn't depend on a car. That was the point. We also didn't have flashlights or any other battery-powered doo-dads.

 

I'm a bit surprised at the last few posts. This is a much more volatile subject than I could have imagined, apparently.

 

When I started this thread, I wanted to know if there were other people who risked a bit of safety to gain a better feeling of accomplishment. It's a mindset that I've had as long as I can remember, and only recently did I find out that other people didn't have the same desires. In fact, I find that I'm in the vast minority (I love that phrase), but I'm not alone.

 

Just as most of you can't imagine why anyone would go on an adventure without a backup, I wonder why it is you need to have one.

 

Jamie

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I agree 100% Jamie. Where would this world be if everyone restrained from doing something just because it might involve some risk?

 

I am thinking just the opposite. it is frightening to think that some people rely on some rather untrustworthy items to save their butts if something happens. If you fall off something, chances are your fancy phones and other electronic items will take a beating as well.

 

Where does it stop? Registered guides are available, they are not a new idea by any means. Maybe we should hire one every time we cache. Maybe we should call the fire and police departments and inform them of our dangerous caching attempt and our intended course and destination. Maybe we should bring along a psychologist in case we suffer from post-traumatic no-find syndrome. Maybe we should bring a camera crew and lawyer in case a blind hunter shoots us so we have proof.

 

Sure, all the gadgets are great to bring along if you want, but if you don't have the common sense, knowledge and ability to make it to a cache as if you had none of these items, you should stick to 1/1s. Or maybe you should stay home. Oh wait, don't stay home, most accidents happen at home. Imagine going to a cache site 15 miles in the woods, slipping and dropping your entire pack off into a raging river. Imagine it's dusk before you regain strength enough to move on. Imagine everything you had - first aid kid, GPS, flashlight, matches, cell phone, compass, and everything else. It can happen - that's when "being prepared" is really going to help you.

 

Sure, bring your phone if you feel like it. But don't criticize those that don't as if the cell phone was the hotline to god.

 

Time is the best teacher; Unfortunately, it kills all its students!

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I have a geo-friend (and you know who you are!!) who calls me at home when he's on the hunt and needs another clue. So I have to get on the internet and find him a clue, then call him back. Guess the cell works for his purposes. I have other friends who call me after 9:00 to use up their free minutes, but that's a whole nuther thread!

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I almost always go alone. I take my cell phone usually but sometimes I forget.

 

I started caching in July. In September for my birthday my daughter had lots of fun making a backpack for me to take with me. It included an emergency blanket, a snack, flashlight, hand sanitizer, and other stuff, some funny, some serious.

 

I have not yet tried any that are too far off the beaten trail. I guess I should leave notes in the car if I do.

 

At 59 finds I am having a blast!!

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I don't carry my cell phone for me. Like my first aid kit, my pistol, and a few other items, I am more likely going to need it because of some other hiker, not because of myself. Now, my ham radio is different! I do chat with some local hams while hiking. And my packet of toilet paper... some things you just don't share!

 

However, I am not embaressed to admit, I would rather call for help than sit 48 hours in the desert waiting to be found. Had a friend stranded out in the mountains with a sprained ankle. He called for help on the ham radio. We jeeped out there, found him, and got him home. Yes, he might have made it on his own. But he doesn't need to prove he is a man to me, I accept that without question anyway. If I want the quiet, I can turn it off. But it will still be with me!

 

I "risked enough safety" in the army. I don't need to prove that anymore. Yes, it can all go to hell in a handbasket in a second. But in the end, driving a tent stake with your head works, but the hammer is more efficient. We are a race of tools. Those of you making jokes about this... did you walk to work? Did you write your reports with a chicken feather and indian ink? Do you wear a buffalo skin sewn by hand? No? Well, it is all just a matter of which tools you use to make your life easier.

 

My jeep has no A/C. That is my choice. My friends jeep does have A/C. Is it still a jeep, or is it not just because he has a better tool to make his life easier?

 

Mike. KD9KC.

El Paso, Texas.

 

Citizens of this land may own guns. Not to threaten their neighbors, but to ensure themselves of liberty and freedom.

 

They are not assault weapons anymore... they are HOMELAND DEFENSE WEAPONS!

 

[This message was edited by KD9KC on October 26, 2002 at 11:41 AM.]

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I used to hike all day with only a pair of shorts nothing else, not even shoes if the earth was moist and green! I never ran into a rattlesnack or fell or had my knee go out then. Was it youth, luck, or just better odds due to lower "mileage"?

Now I carry a cell phone, since I've had numerous close encouters with rattlesnakes, hike alone and drive on mountain roads at night.

I often mark waypoints were a cellular call can be made. Also carry an LED flashlight/beacon and mirror. Never had to use them, that's fine.

 

I think most of us get a thrill by pushing some kind of personal limit. Funny, the drive to "wherever" is probably the most dangerous part of an activity.

 

Many places I hike or camp, might receive a cellular signal by walking/crawling to the top of a hill. A Globalstar Sat phone would be the ultimate dream communication tool. Ham radio looks interesting. Most rangers, police, fireman, S&R, carry and depend on radio communication devices. They are extremely powerful tools.

 

At least helping someone else out with cell phone/SAT or Ham communications, seems like a high probability occurance while out in the woods.

----------

Greenjeens

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Since my wife usually doesn't hike with me, she'd worry all day about me if I didn't carry a cell phone. So carrying it is the right thing to do. However, she often calls me just to chat and "disturbs" my reverie, so I tell her I'm running into an area that doesn't have coverage and shut it off for an hour or so. She's still happy because I have the cell. I'm happy becasue she's happy plus I also like the safety aspect for me to have it handy just in case.

 

The other neat thing is since I cache alone, I do miss the companionship of sharing the beauty of some areas, or the moments of finding the cache etc. So a little call home and I can share the "Kodak" moment with someone else in real time. Another cool feature. icon_cool.gif

 

Alan

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I visited a local hamfest this morning looking for a disconnected cell phone to carry as a last resort if I needed to dial 911 or call my wife for help.

 

Instead, I found a table with about 20 or 30 cell phones and a sign, "Free if you take them all."

 

So I did. I'm going to sort through them, test them, find all the good ones, keep two or three for myself and put the rest on the garage sale forum for the cost of shipping plus any "donation" folks would like to make to my ammo box fund. =-)

 

(There will, of course, be no warranties or guarantees. :-)@

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quote:
Originally posted by Alan2:

 

The other neat thing is since I cache alone, I do miss the companionship of sharing the beauty of some areas, or the moments of finding the cache etc. So a little call home and I can share the "Kodak" moment with someone else in real time. Another cool feature. icon_cool.gif

 

Alan


 

Hmmm. That gives me an idea. Anyone hook up their cell to their digital camera so they can email pictures while they're caching? What's your set-up? Video frames?

 

Alan

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Ham radio is much better than a cell phone for wilderness hiking.

 

Until satellite phones become cheap/common, ham radio will have much more coverage in remote/rural areas. A "2-meter HT" can often communicate with one or more repeaters located on mountaintops, giving your radio an effective communication range of many miles. If you get into trouble 'out there', other hams will be able to get help to you!

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quote:
Originally posted by HardCache:

 

Instead, I found a table with about 20 or 30 cell phones and a sign, "Free if you take them all."

 

So I did. I'm going to sort through them, test them, find all the good ones,


 

Let me know if I can help with programming. I have some of the codes and procedures for resetting some handsets. I've done a bunch. Think a buddy still has a pile of older Motorola CLA car chargers, (One type only) for the smaller brick handsets.

----------

Greenjeens

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quote:
Originally posted by Black Dog Trackers:

Ham radio is much better than a cell phone for wilderness hiking.

 

Until satellite phones become cheap/common, ham radio will have much more coverage in remote/rural areas.


 

Yes and no. I carry a 2m ht when I hike, of course, and am licensed to use it. (Though I should point out that in a real life or death emergency, any communicatons medium possible is legal whether you're licensed or not.)

 

The problem with 2m hts, however, is that you are at the mercy of the local ham community in the area you hike. If you can't find a repeater or the ones that are available are closed, then you're stuck.

 

These days areas without cell coverage are becoming fewer and farther between. Last summer I went to the Quetico and, purely on a lark, carried a same-price-everywhere cell phone. I wanted to prove that cell phones can't be used everywhere and shouldn't be counted on to my neices. However, I discovered that they've built really BIG cell towers along highway 11 so you can actually get useful cell service at a reasonable rate in the Quetico wilderness for a surprising distance. At one point I was about 15-20 miles from highway 11 in an area called the Flood Waters and had nominal cell service. It was creepy and a bit disillusioning to be unable to escape the modern world.

 

Now, if you're hiking in actual mountains, then both cell phones AND 2m hts will be a problem. If you're in a valley with no repeaters on any of the peaks, then the ht won't do you alot of good. Of course, if you can climb TO one of the peaks then you can do some "mountain-topping."

 

However, if you need to call for help, it's unlikely you'll be able to climb to the peak...unless that's where you're already stuck.

 

In either case, we can pursue the emergency communications issue ad absurdum, which I'm inclined to do purely out of some smart-aleck need to do weird things, and carry not only a cell phone and a 2m ht but also a handheld CB radio (which I picked up free with the cell phones) and a qrp shortwave rig with a small solar panel.

 

Then you'll be prepared to seek rescue not only from hams and friends and family but also from truckers, houses of ill repute in Nevada and people in Zimbabwe. =-D

 

But, you know, this whole "what if I get hurt in the woods" thing really misses a point. Tonight I was working late at my company's new building, installing all the wiring for the phones and network. I was completely alone, in a brand new strip mall without any other tenants. There is only one phone hooked up clear in the back room.

 

I was hunching at each outlet, installing the jacks, which was just killing my back so I laid down on the floor to straighten my spine for a couple minutes. As I was lying there, it suddenly occurred to me that, if I had had a heart attack, I would probably just die and, by the time anyone realized something was wrong, it'd be too late to resuscitate me...Voodoo Zombification excepted.

 

Outside the building were thousands of homes all within a 60 second walking distance and dozens of businesses.

 

But, despite all those people and a telephone in the back room, there are things that could happen where I'd be just as out of luck as I would be in some wilderness.

 

That's why I think geocachers who hike in lonely areas should have first aid training and be familiar with the hazards inherent to their area. They should also be physically fit, aware of their surroundings and they should make sure to tell someone reliable where they'll be and when to expect them to return.

 

w

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