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When am I no longer a newbie?


Boneman65
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This is maybe only a half-serious question. But then again, I'm only a half-serious kind of guy.

 

I'm just curious, in your subjective opinions, how many finds you think an individual should amass before they can no longer be considered a newbie?

Edited by Boneman65
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This is maybe only a half-serious question. But then again, I'm only a half-serious kind of guy.

 

I'm just curious, in your subjective opinions, how many finds an individual should amass before they can no longer be considered a newbie?

When you no longer ask that question :P

 

Seriously (or half seriously), I don't really know. You're the best judge of when you're no longer a newbie.

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Now there's a thought...The smilies on the map page should be a yellow smiley for Regular Members and Signal the Frog for Premium Members. :P

 

Now there's a thought...The smilies on the map page should be Signal the Frog for Premium Members and a yellow smiley face for Regular Members. :P

 

See what I mean?

Edited by SkellyCA
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Now there's a thought...The smilies on the map page should be a yellow smiley for Regular Members and Signal the Frog for Premium Members. :P

 

Now there's a thought...The smilies on the map page should be Signal the Frog for Premium Members and a yellow smiley face for Regular Members. :)

 

See what I mean?

Actually, no... what do you mean?

 

I wonder if a greasemonkey script can do that for you if you insist.

 

I don't agree with the premium membership part either. However, if you rephrase it as "if you know the added value of a premium membership" I'd go with that.

 

As for no longer a newbie in the forums, I nominate "able to name 10 of the dead horse topics" :P

Edited by Chrysalides
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This is maybe only a half-serious question. But then again, I'm only a half-serious kind of guy.

 

I'm just curious, in your subjective opinions, how many finds you think an individual should amass before they can no longer be considered a newbie?

 

As you specifically asked for the number of finds, I'll suggest 50.

 

However, I'd like to suggest an alternative definition: You're no longer a newbie once you've logged at least one of 6 different types of geocache and correctly moved along at least 10 trackables. :P

 

MrsB

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This is maybe only a half-serious question. But then again, I'm only a half-serious kind of guy.

 

I'm just curious, in your subjective opinions, how many finds you think an individual should amass before they can no longer be considered a newbie?

 

As you specifically asked for the number of finds, I'll suggest 50.

 

However, I'd like to suggest an alternative definition: You're no longer a newbie once you've logged at least one of 6 different types of geocache and correctly moved along at least 10 trackables. :P

 

MrsB

 

no. and the reason is some of us aren't into all the different types of geocacahes, and/or some of us aren't into trackables. did the first geocache ever have a trackable? was geocaching started as a way to 'score points' or see who could do 'this many' of 'this or that'?

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I'll propose that being a newbie isn't necessarily something to hurry past. When you're a kid you want to grow up... then when you're grown up you appreciate the great freedoms you had as a kid! I hope that you enjoy geocaching for years to come and find it exciting because the "experience" you gain serves to enhance the continual excitement of what's "new."

 

You can really learn a lot from experience. But my wish for you is that you never progress to the point where you complete this sentence in a forum post:

"Back when I started caching, <insert gripe here>."

 

JMHO

 

:P Bean

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This is maybe only a half-serious question. But then again, I'm only a half-serious kind of guy.

 

I'm just curious, in your subjective opinions, how many finds you think an individual should amass before they can no longer be considered a newbie?

 

As you specifically asked for the number of finds, I'll suggest 50.

 

However, I'd like to suggest an alternative definition: You're no longer a newbie once you've logged at least one of 6 different types of geocache and correctly moved along at least 10 trackables. :P

 

MrsB

 

no. and the reason is some of us aren't into all the different types of geocacahes, and/or some of us aren't into trackables. did the first geocache ever have a trackable? was geocaching started as a way to 'score points' or see who could do 'this many' of 'this or that'?

 

My suggestion was nothing to with scoring points, but rather the idea that one would no longer be a "newbie" once one's had a good range of geocaching experience. I suggested the idea of 50 caches but someone who has only ever found 50 trad caches I would consider to be less experienced than someone who's found 50 caches, of varying types, and D/T ratings. I also consider that moving trackables along correctly is a fairly important skill to acquire for any new geocacher.

 

MrsB :P

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I've been geocaching for 70 days as of today. Yesterday I was called a newbie by someone who's been at it for over a year. A little later he revealed that he's found 68 caches so far. I didn't reveal that I'd found close to 400 more than he had.

 

I guess the point I'm trying to make is everyone defines newbie differently and the title means a lot more to some than others. Me? I just cache to enjoy myself and I'm quite comfortable with the idea that some may consider me a newbie. I'm even ok with them pointing it out if it makes 'em feel better.

 

Pete

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Find numbers are of limited value when considering the "geosense" one develops. Someone who has found 10 very difficult and creative hides is far more experienced than someone who has found 50 lamppost skirtlifters. Experience is about quality, not quantity :P

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Only you can answer that. For some folks the number is 20 or 25 for others, it is well into the hundreds or more.

 

Its when you realize that you do not "have to" find every cache out there. You just need to have fun. Walk away if it isn't fun. There are plently more out there.

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I also consider that moving trackables along correctly is a fairly important skill to acquire for any new geocacher.

 

Please tell us why this is an important skill to learn to acquire for any new Geocachers.

 

I have been caching for 3 1/2 years, and have found over 600 caches, but I guess I'm still a Newbie?? I have never moved any trackable, and have only "discovered" one coin, (some friends were showing me that part of the game).

 

I'm just not interested in that part of the game. I know a lot of cachers get a lot of pleasure out of the trackables. But like other parts of this game it is not for everyone, and one does not have to play them all, to no longer be a newbie.

 

As for the six different types of caches, again not all cache types interest all players.

 

I agree with those that say you are no longer a newbie when you no longer feel like one. You will know.

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As for the six different types of caches, again not all cache types interest all players.

 

Or there are those of us who do not have ready access to that many cache types.

 

Here in Tucson we have Traditional, Multi, Virtual and puzzle. No Wherigo (one, inactive), no Project APE, no Letterbox Hybrid (that I am aware of), AFAIK no Earthcaches. Events are rare out here (one CITO every few months).

So living in Tucson, and not driving, I guess under the 'log 6 kinds of caches' I am destined to forever stay a newbie?

 

I think I'll make my "you're no longer a newbie when:" you know that there's no "scoring" in the game, and that everyone plays it their own way. >.>

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I also consider that moving trackables along correctly is a fairly important skill to acquire for any new geocacher.

 

Please tell us why this is an important skill to learn to acquire for any new Geocachers...

 

 

In my original post you will notice I put a smiley grin against my comment - That was meant to imply "Don't take this too seriously"...

 

I appreciate that you personally choose not to handle trackable items, but my experience is that the majority of geocachers do like to move them along. Many, many new geocachers are delighted when they find their first TB or geocoin and often pick it up without understanding all the 'general etiquette' involved with these items. This can sometimes result in trackables turning up in strange, unexpected caches or disappearing for months/years on end and it causes their owners anything from mild annoyance to outright grief and hair-pulling, as is evident from the regular topics about Missing Trackables that appear on these forums.

 

Hence my belief that it's "a fairly important skill for any new geocachers to acquire."

 

MrsB :P

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As already indicated, your question does not have an easy and/or hard fast answer. However, if you are still excited when you find a light post hide (LPH or LPC) you are definately still a newbie!

We were absolutely thrilled when we found our first LPC. We thought it was ingenious. That was in 2004.

 

We considered ourselves to be "real" geocachers when we passed the 100 find mark near the end of 2004 after almost a year of caching. So for us it was a year and 100 finds.

 

As has been stated several times here it depends on the person. You jave already taken a step the vast majority of cachers never take by venturing into the forums. Maybe that means you are no longer a newbie. :laughing:

 

My advice is to have fun and not worry about labels. If you meet up with others who do worry about labels, don't worry about their opinions too much. :D

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Some days I am still a newbie, others I am experienced. All down to whether or not my geosenses are with me. We will move a trackable if we can do so quickly, and to a cache that seems to be well visited.

Just remember, new, nearly new, seasoned or senior......we are all geocachers! And lovin' it!

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We have been geocacher's for one month and 6 days today. Sometimes we feel like newbies, other days, like yesterday, we feel experienced. Yesterday we were experienced, we were able to find cache's right off the bat. Today, we were definitely newbies, we only found one cache, and couldn't even find the road to another cache we were looking for.

I think it's all about you and how you feel, and never mind about what others think or say. I do believe milestones are something to get excited about, like your 50th, 100th, 200th, find etc. But, whatever floats your boat works! Just remember, keep having fun, keep being in awe of the new experiences and beauty you find around you, and muggles don't have a clue about what they are missing!!!

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... When you no longer feel you're a newbie.

 

There's no solid statistic for it. Some people can still be 'newbie' cachers after 100 finds. Some cease being 'newbies' within 10 finds.

 

Somewhat along the lines of Zolgar's post, I was going to say that I'm pretty sure some folk I know must have been born geocachers, and some folk that I know are unlikely to ever grow out of being a 'newbie'!!

 

So, I guess my answer is: there really is no answer!!!

 

Annie

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