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Pictures - Cool Cache Containers (CCC's)


AmishHacker
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here's a pic that's a little better than the ones I posted earlier, this is the containers in natural light, I just got them loaded in the truck so they will be close at hand as I look for new locations.

 

cachecamo3.jpg

 

Lock N Lock containers have really grown on me, so much cheaper than decons and ammo cans and the variety of sizes means you can find one to fit the spot. All these caches need is some swag and they will be ready to go! I just added the logbooks and pencils a little while ago. I enjoyed painting these so much I don't think I'll ever use camo tape again.

Edited by Tsmola
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Here's one that I'll be placing in the near future with instructions so you can play along at home. :laughing: I added some magnets to the top to center the lid when its rotated closed.

 

Untitled%20-%202.jpg

 

thanks for the info!!! can't wait to try it! okay, my brother will have to do the cutting for me-i'm not good with a chainsaw, yet.

 

tmac

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Does anyone have an idea how well dirt would stayed glued onto a container?

I duct-taped a lock'nlock and have almost finished gluing on plenty of dirt. I'll post a picture when I get the chance, but it would be nice to know if after all the trouble it will stay together.

 

Well, considering how firmly it stays attached to my car...

 

try mixing some glue with dirt, then let it harden. Then glue the chunks to the can!

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Theres a cache in town here, a micro, that is part of a steel pipe and chain wire fence. The posts are 2 inch pipe, with caps on the tops to stop water entry. The construction of the fence means there is a bolt through the post about 6 inches down from the top. The person who hid this micro tapped off the post cap, dropped a couple of largish rocks down the inside of the post where they sit on the bolt, then filled it to about 2 inches from the top with pebbles. The 35mm film canister sits on top of this. The post cap is then jammed back on top. The coordinates given are spot on, and there is nothing there, except for this fence, and a bush.

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Cool or Cruel?

 

25sr610.jpg

 

Cool if the cache is in the desert or in a city park somewhere. :(

 

Cruel if the cache is at the beach or next to a lake. :anibad:

 

And, actually, unless the whole thing is hidden really well anyway, I think there's a high chance of it being muggled... at least here in NC, a cool shell like that would immediately attract someone who would pocket it. :rolleyes:

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Does anyone have an idea how well dirt would stayed glued onto a container?

I duct-taped a lock'nlock and have almost finished gluing on plenty of dirt. I'll post a picture when I get the chance, but it would be nice to know if after all the trouble

 

 

 

I use that $1.00 a tube caulking and a rubber glove and put all manner of forest floor

detritus on it. There should be a couple photos back above a ways. The cover

depends on where you want to put it. I once use an old flat metal can that I got

the ubiquitous CD web offer in and covered it with pine needles - you don't think

I put that under an oak tree do ya?

 

worked great!

 

cc\

Edited by CompuCash
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P1010288.jpg

P1010297.jpg

 

Granted I can't tell from the picture exactly what this is but having been an electrician at one time, to me this would look like a severe safety issue. There is no way in **** I would reach in and pull out a bare wire. I'll give you this, it is cool, but please reconsider. Even if that wire is dead there is always the possibility of there being a break in the insulation of the other wires. :lol:

 

It was placed in a 'museum piece' in the park behind the maritime museum. It was a submarine motor detached from the 'Ben Franklin' which is displayed there as well, and part of my emigma cache where you had to hunt for a submarine. It would be obvious to all, I hope, that it was not a functioning motor.

 

At any rate, archived due to said cache been muggled twice.

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Alex, it depends on the glue, and how long you let it cure after you apply the dirt.

Elmer's Glue-All? :ph34r: I didn't touch it for at least a day afterwards, and tried to put on several layers. So far, it's holding up OK - at least the glue is. The only problem is that larger clumps of dirt break apart.

 

containerandlidfq2.th.jpg

containerbottomue0.th.jpg

containertopub1.th.jpg

 

EDIT: The images are hosted on ImageShack. Click the thumbnail to view the full image since they are large.

Edited by alexrudd
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I found a cache the other day that on the cache page many people had commented on but the owner had asked cachers not to mention what it was in the logs, so as not to spoil the surprise. The clue told us to look under a large piece of bark, and whe we did I almost jumped! It was a rubber snake with the logbook rolled up in its mouth!

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This has probably already been covered, but PINECACHE!

 

192340769_85058ac487x.jpg

 

192340768_f7c93acb99x.jpg

 

How did you make a hole in the bottom of the pinecone without it cracking? I have tried this and it never seems to work....

 

I didn't make the cache, but they somehow glued a micro canister into the inside. The micro (nano) canister has a hook on top that attaches to a hook screwed into the tree.

Edited by Juicepig
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This Thread is fantastic!

 

Thought I'd chime in with a container I made for an underwater cache near my house.

 

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_detai...4a-58577307b58f

 

Started with an old OtterBox that I had. Covered it with Magic-Sculp (sculpt-able 2-part epoxy clay) and a variety of rocks and shells. Added some scotch brite from an old sponge as "algae". Sadly, after months of service this container was muggled a few weeks ago - but an even better one has taken its place! :D

 

FlintsSilverBox.jpg

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This Thread is fantastic!

 

Thought I'd chime in with a container I made for an underwater cache near my house.

 

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_detai...4a-58577307b58f

 

Started with an old OtterBox that I had. Covered it with Magic-Sculp (sculpt-able 2-part epoxy clay) and a variety of rocks and shells. Added some scotch brite from an old sponge as "algae". Sadly, after months of service this container was muggled a few weeks ago - but an even better one has taken its place! :D

 

FlintsSilverBox.jpg

Very cool! What's an otter box?

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Did you have any complaints about leakage?

 

Welp, the case did leak - in fact I did tests with both the small pelican cases and otterbox cases (held them underwater in our shop sink for a few weeks) and both leaked. I think that it is inevitable for those types of containers to leak after so long underwater. One of the larger and more expensive pelican cases may make it - but I'd be concerned about cachers getting sand on the o-ring seal when opening and closing the cache and thus causing it to leak. Also - they are expensive! I felt guilty enough buying a 20$ otterbox for this cache and adding 10$ of epoxy and a 15$ clip! (I opted for a smaller brass clip for version 2 - it is easier to conceal and was a heck of a lot cheaper!). Knowing water would get in there I stoked it with a waterproof logbook and pencils.

 

For a truly waterproof (albeit most likely micro) cache I think your best bet would be to buy a well made dive flashlight and remove the batteries/electronics. The case would be very strong and the "screw down" waterproof o-ring seal would hold up much better than the "clip top" o-rings seal on the boxes mentioned above. Hmmm. I just may have to go and make one of those... I wish I thought of that last week! <_<

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Alex, it depends on the glue, and how long you let it cure after you apply the dirt.

Elmer's Glue-All? :anitongue: I didn't touch it for at least a day afterwards, and tried to put on several layers. So far, it's holding up OK - at least the glue is. The only problem is that larger clumps of dirt break apart.

 

containerandlidfq2.th.jpg

<snip>

Erm, don't use this idea. Within a week, half of the dirt and glue was completely gone, and shiny duct tape was rather visible. :rolleyes:

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Don't forget that these things are going to get repeatedly handled, probably less carefully than you, too!

 

We had one with some bark glued and wired to a plastic mixing bowl which was used as a cover over the cache proper. It was pretty tough, but it's now almost 'bald' after many months of being picked up and replaced. And that didn't need to be held while the cache was opened and closed...

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Don't forget that these things are going to get repeatedly handled, probably less carefully than you, too!

 

We had one with some bark glued and wired to a plastic mixing bowl which was used as a cover over the cache proper. It was pretty tough, but it's now almost 'bald' after many months of being picked up and replaced. And that didn't need to be held while the cache was opened and closed...

 

now that's neat idea!

 

I have been using clear caulking compound and real pine needles, oak leaves, and what have you. Have not had a chance to use rocks yet but I'm looking for the right place. It seems to be holding up fairly well.

I bought some cheap 'potpourri' at the dollar store - that looked pretty good. Also phony moss (model railroad) worked well.

 

Most of mine are like these above -

http://forums.Groundspeak.com/GC/index.php...t&p=2423002

 

cc\

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I'd think that after the first rainfall, any dirt that was there would wash off. I'd go with the earlier-mentioned mixing of dirt with glue, and gluing clumps of THAT onto the box.
No sign of the glue on the bald patches either. Oh well, I guess my cache container was "cool" up until I placed it. :laughing:
While I think that camo attempts like these are doomed to failure, I think the main problem was your choice of glue. Elmers is great for elementary school art projects, it is not very weather resistant.
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Fm, that's way kewl! Could you describe the process? Is it burlap on netting?

 

That's exactly what it is. Great eye!!

I dyed the burlap with that Rit fabric dye, then cut it into 1inch strips about a foot or so long, depending on how far down you want the ends to hang. Use a short length of jute (string) to tie the middle of each burlap strip to a point in the netting. Repeat that step until you have nice full coverage. After I tied all the burlap on, I pulled out the width-wise pieces of burlap, leaving only the lengthwise strands hanging down. The next time I make one of these I'll not pull out the width pieces because it really thins out the camo. I'll tie the burlap on and then leave it as is.

On this one I tied in a bunch of strands of un-dyed burlap (the light brown colour). It resembles dead, brown long grass strands, and it breaks up the mass of green to futher add to the camo effect. You can also dye some burlap dark brown and add some strips of that as well. You have to know what the area is like before you build one, then choose colours that'll work the best. I have to go back to this one before it gets published and add even more of the un-dyed burlap strips to fit the hide a little better.

Oh ya, to attach the netting to the box I used some of that Goop glue. This one happens to be a plastic ammo box, made by Plano, and the glue bonded quite well. I haven't tried this on a metal box yet, so I have no recommendation on what glue to use. I'm going to try the Goop, though, because it worked so well on the plastic box. Take care to make sure the box opens OK with the netting attached.

This box was just put out and hasn't even been published yet, so I can't say how it'll look after getting rained or snowed on. I'm guessing it'll need some fluffing up when I do maintenance checks on it. I wouldn't be surprised if I had to replace the camo once a year or so, but that wouldn't be too big a deal. I could make the camo here then take it out, cut off the old netting and glue the new stuff on.

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I've been experimenting with some different types of glue and lock & locks lately. I've been using spanish moss as my medium of choice. My favorite glue so far has been Gorilla Glue but I have had good luck with some of the industrial building glues from the hardware store also. The Gorilla Glue is nice because it expands as it hardens and contacts more of the spanish moss. The key to using them directly on the plastic container is to rough the container up a bunch so they have something to grip. I take a vibrating sander and a very gritty sandpaper to the container before I apply the glue. The next thing is getting the moss to contact the container in as many places as possible. I started by putting heavy weights on the container but found it was impossible to get even coverage (especially on the sides of the container). My current method is to apply the glue, then the moss, and finally wrap the entire thing with ace wrap (the stuff you wrap a sprained ankle with) very, very tightly and leave it until it is dry. It seems to stick very well and I plan to put one of these out in the field next week and see how it goes.

 

That being said, the method I used for my last cache was the same as above except instead of placing the moss directly on the lock & lock I wrapped the lock & lock with camo tape. I used camo tape I purchased from cabelas instead of duct tape. Duct tape is smooth on the outside and the camo tape from Cabelas has a cloth exterior. I then applied the moss and wrapped it with the ace wrap as I mentioned above. My thinking is that if the moss all falls off or is torn off by a careless cacher then the camo will still hide it.

 

I have lots of glue and lots of moss so I'm going to continue to experiment and will let you know if I find anything that works better.

 

Joe

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I started by putting heavy weights on the container but found it was impossible to get even coverage (especially on the sides of the container). My current method is to apply the glue, then the moss, and finally wrap the entire thing with ace wrap (the stuff you wrap a sprained ankle with) very, very tightly and leave it until it is dry. It seems to stick very well and I plan to put one of these out in the field next week and see how it goes.

 

I have lots of glue and lots of moss so I'm going to continue to experiment and will let you know if I find anything that works better.

 

Joe

To tightly wrap the camo after putting the moss on it put the can inside a garbage bag and suck the air out with a vacuum cleaner.

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