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How do power trails work?


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Probably because of all the different "techniques" used to complete them to include container hopping, missing cache throw-down replacements, and more. Also, after doing hundreds of caches in a row, I would suppose most people can't begin t remember which caches were DNF'd, plus they know the caches won't be checked, so they just claim a find on all of them.

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If a cache goes missing the CO is supposed to replace it. However, if people don't log there DNFs, then the CO may not know they are missing. That is why you should always log your DNFs. Even if you did find it if you notice a problem like a wet, moldy, or full log make a note of it in your log so the CO knows about it.

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If a cache goes missing the CO is supposed to replace it. However, if people don't log there DNFs, then the CO may not know they are missing. That is why you should always log your DNFs. Even if you did find it if you notice a problem like a wet, moldy, or full log make a note of it in your log so the CO knows about it.

 

I'm not sure how the meaningless 'you should always log your DNFs' drivel applies to Power Trails. Or why you even brought it up here. Those are for normal caches. Though if a cache has two DNFs, I drop it from my GPX file. SuzyW, and HowieQ, had a flat tire on the way to the cache so they both DNFed it. That's two DNFs and gets eliminated from my list. (In most cases.)

But a true Power Trail. Same hide every 528 feet down the highway. Nobody cares if the cache is actually there. Toss a throw down without slowing the car down! Or move the conainer to the next cache. Sign the log while the driver is driving to the next one.

So, I'm not sure I see the relevance of logging a DNF to a Power Trail cache.

(Not that I've tried a Power Trail, but this is what I read on the fora...)

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If a cache goes missing the CO is supposed to replace it. However, if people don't log there DNFs, then the CO may not know they are missing. That is why you should always log your DNFs. Even if you did find it if you notice a problem like a wet, moldy, or full log make a note of it in your log so the CO knows about it.

 

I'm not sure how the meaningless 'you should always log your DNFs' drivel applies to Power Trails. Or why you even brought it up here. Those are for normal caches. Though if a cache has two DNFs, I drop it from my GPX file. SuzyW, and HowieQ, had a flat tire on the way to the cache so they both DNFed it. That's two DNFs and gets eliminated from my list. (In most cases.)

But a true Power Trail. Same hide every 528 feet down the highway. Nobody cares if the cache is actually there. Toss a throw down without slowing the car down! Or move the conainer to the next cache. Sign the log while the driver is driving to the next one.

So, I'm not sure I see the relevance of logging a DNF to a Power Trail cache.

(Not that I've tried a Power Trail, but this is what I read on the fora...)

 

Some of the things that I've read about in the forums in regard to power trails that you don't typically see with other caches

 

Cache owners allow and even encourage replacement caches.

 

Caches owners are generally more lenient about the use of stickers on log books

 

Cache owners allow container swapping (removing the cache and replacing it with one previously found)

 

Cache owners allow people that never get out of the vehicle to post found it logs.

 

Cache owners allow skip finding caches in the series if someone else in the team has found it.

 

Cache owners are more tolerant of cut-n-paste or extremely terse logs.

 

Caches owner will form a team to hide all caches in the series and then post found it logs on all of them (because each member of the team doesn't get "credit" for the hide.

 

Cache owners will create an account for the team then turn of email notification (or filter it) so that they don't have to see thousands of found it logs.

 

It's almost like a complete different game is being played.

 

 

 

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Cache owners allow and even encourage replacement caches.

 

Caches owners are generally more lenient about the use of stickers on log books

 

Cache owners allow container swapping (removing the cache and replacing it with one previously found)

 

Cache owners allow people that never get out of the vehicle to post found it logs.

 

Cache owners allow skip finding caches in the series if someone else in the team has found it.

 

Cache owners are more tolerant of cut-n-paste or extremely terse logs.

 

Caches owner will form a team to hide all caches in the series and then post found it logs on all of them (because each member of the team doesn't get "credit" for the hide.

 

Cache owners will create an account for the team then turn of email notification (or filter it) so that they don't have to see thousands of found it logs.

 

It's almost like a complete different game is being played.

 

The cache owner does not/is not going to do maintenance, pleas leave a throw-down.

 

The cache owner will not be looking at the log, do whatever you want with it.

 

See 1 and 2.

 

Also, see 1 and 2.

 

The CO has set up an email address that they never look at for your log to go to, write as much or as little as you like.

 

Yup, a whole 'nother game...

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The cache owner does not/is not going to do maintenance, pleas leave a throw-down.

 

The cache owner will not be looking at the log, do whatever you want with it.

 

See 1 and 2.

 

Also, see 1 and 2.

 

The CO has set up an email address that they never look at for your log to go to, write as much or as little as you like.

 

Yup, a whole 'nother game...

That I have to disagree with. I needed to test a few things with GSAK and needed a real cache. I would log a find and delete it (Didn't want my find counts messed up). Did this several times. Used something around 200 or so on Route 66. Next day I got an email from the CO asking if I was having trouble with their cache. Apparently they do read the emails on the separate account. The next time I tried that trick on another power trail my log did say I was testing and would be deleting the find. Didn't get an email that time.

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What happens if a cache is stolen? Why are there no DNF's on logs? Two big questions I have about power trails. I do not understand these caches.

 

Sorry, there are probably lots of topics already on here about this but I couldn't find any after searching for one minute. :P

 

Absolutely nothing happens. Have at it.

 

Now let's wait until to see if a reviewer or a forum mod disagrees with me, setting the record straight.

 

 

bd

Edited by BlueDeuce
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The cache owner does not/is not going to do maintenance, pleas leave a throw-down.

 

The cache owner will not be looking at the log, do whatever you want with it.

 

See 1 and 2.

 

Also, see 1 and 2.

 

The CO has set up an email address that they never look at for your log to go to, write as much or as little as you like.

 

Yup, a whole 'nother game...

That I have to disagree with. I needed to test a few things with GSAK and needed a real cache. I would log a find and delete it (Didn't want my find counts messed up). Did this several times. Used something around 200 or so on Route 66. Next day I got an email from the CO asking if I was having trouble with their cache. Apparently they do read the emails on the separate account. The next time I tried that trick on another power trail my log did say I was testing and would be deleting the find. Didn't get an email that time.

 

I probably should clarify that I'm not suggesting that all cache owners or cache finders do all of the things on the list. They're all just practices I've observed that occur with a power trail.

 

 

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SuzyW, and HowieQ, had a flat tire on the way to the cache so they both DNFed it.

 

Why would someone log a DNF for something they didn't try and find. It would take forever for to log a DNF on all 2 million caches I haven't tried to find.

 

Better get busy then! :lol:

 

I'd bet even an automatic DNF logging bot couldn't keep up with the new caches getting published. :ph34r:

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The cache owner does not/is not going to do maintenance, pleas leave a throw-down.

 

The cache owner will not be looking at the log, do whatever you want with it.

 

See 1 and 2.

 

Also, see 1 and 2.

 

The CO has set up an email address that they never look at for your log to go to, write as much or as little as you like.

 

Yup, a whole 'nother game...

That I have to disagree with. I needed to test a few things with GSAK and needed a real cache. I would log a find and delete it (Didn't want my find counts messed up). Did this several times. Used something around 200 or so on Route 66. Next day I got an email from the CO asking if I was having trouble with their cache. Apparently they do read the emails on the separate account. The next time I tried that trick on another power trail my log did say I was testing and would be deleting the find. Didn't get an email that time.

 

I probably should clarify that I'm not suggesting that all cache owners or cache finders do all of the things on the list. They're all just practices I've observed that occur with a power trail.

 

I forgot something.

 

The power trail owner(s) may have placed a large cache at each end of the trail with a bunch of ready-made caches for finders to use to replace any missing containers along the trail. Therefore no DNF...and no owner maintenance either.

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SuzyW, and HowieQ, had a flat tire on the way to the cache so they both DNFed it.

 

Why would someone log a DNF for something they didn't try and find. It would take forever for to log a DNF on all 2 million caches I haven't tried to find.

 

Once I am using my GPS to navigate to a cache the hunt has started. If the hunt has started and I don't find the cache I log a DNF regardless of the reason

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Almost?

That is a completely different game.

It's certainly not geocaching.

 

I'm not even sure it's a game. I think I'd rather help Sisyphus with that big rock of his.

 

Once I am using my GPS to navigate to a cache the hunt has started. If the hunt has started and I don't find the cache I log a DNF regardless of the reason

 

Although I only log a DNF if I actually got to the spot and did an actual search of the area, I'm all in favor of people logging any attempt at a cache. An attempt is an attempt, no matter what reason a person did not follow through or did not succeed. If people don't log DNFs because a huge cliff got in the way and they never got to GZ, then future finders will not have the benefit of knowing about it ahead of time, and the owner will never know what impact it had on people trying to get to the cache. Geocaching is a two-component deal: get there, and find it. Most people agree that a DNF is for people who don't accomplish the second part, but the first part is also important.

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Once I am using my GPS to navigate to a cache the hunt has started. If the hunt has started and I don't find the cache I log a DNF regardless of the reason

 

Although I only log a DNF if I actually got to the spot and did an actual search of the area, I'm all in favor of people logging any attempt at a cache. An attempt is an attempt, no matter what reason a person did not follow through or did not succeed. If people don't log DNFs because a huge cliff got in the way and they never got to GZ, then future finders will not have the benefit of knowing about it ahead of time, and the owner will never know what impact it had on people trying to get to the cache. Geocaching is a two-component deal: get there, and find it. Most people agree that a DNF is for people who don't accomplish the second part, but the first part is also important.

 

I have to agree... the first part is important. A DNF tell's people (owner and other cachers) about the cache, it's level of difficulty, whether or not it's still there. There have been many times I've set out to find caches and while driving to the location I get turned around and don't make the trip. If I haven't gotten there and at least made an attempt to find... then I really can't say "I didn't find" the cache. If I start the hunt and run into a cliff (it's happened more than once), I either find a way around, or if I don't have time, I log a DNF with something like "ran into a cliff, will try a different path next time".

 

It just strikes me as odd that someone would log a DNF on a cache they didn't try and find because they couldn't/didn't get to the location.

 

As for power trails... just like other types of caches, I can see their usefullness. I'm taking my son's Tiger Cub Den out out on a hike in a few weeks and there is a short (15 cache) power trail along the rail-to-trail hiking path. It's perfect for the Den as it gives every scout a chance to find a cache.

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It just strikes me as odd that someone would log a DNF on a cache they didn't try and find because they couldn't/didn't get to the location.

 

I think that depends on the "why". If my car breaks down between home and parking, I woudln't log a DNF.

 

If the bridge between parking and the cache is washed out, a DNF will allert the CO and future finders to the problem, and that the cache may not be findable.

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As for power trails... just like other types of caches, I can see their usefullness. I'm taking my son's Tiger Cub Den out out on a hike in a few weeks and there is a short (15 cache) power trail along the rail-to-trail hiking path. It's perfect for the Den as it gives every scout a chance to find a cache.

 

Well, there are power trails, and then there are power trails. The kind that involve hiking through nice areas aren't so bad, except that the owners tend to resort to making exactly the same cache every time, without swag, over-running other caches and locations, etc. Then there are power trails at the side of the road, in the middle of nowhere (drive, stop, get out, search the bush, stamp, get back in, repeat). Even when done at their best, I still prefer to think of a cache as a destination, rather than an inconvenience along a journey.

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A properly done power trail can be a great way for newbies to learn the craft of Geocaching. We have one in our area, it has a great mix of hides and containers from micro to at least one that must be a two gallon container.

It also has some great history for those inclined to actually read the description.

There are also several terrific historical locations on the trail.

Edited by CamoriCouple
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A properly done power trail can be a great way for newbies to learn the craft of Geocaching. We have one in our area, it has a great mix of hides and containers from micro to at least one that must be a two gallon container.

It also has some great history for those inclined to actually read the description.

There are also several terrific historical locations on the trail.

 

You are lucky.

 

If all 'power trails' were like that they wouldn't have such a general stigma with us old-timers. :)

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A properly done power trail can be a great way for newbies to learn the craft of Geocaching. We have one in our area, it has a great mix of hides and containers from micro to at least one that must be a two gallon container.

It also has some great history for those inclined to actually read the description.

There are also several terrific historical locations on the trail.

 

You are lucky.

 

If all 'power trails' were like that they wouldn't have such a general stigma with us old-timers. :)

 

They are lucky indeed!

 

However, i'm not sure if what they're talking about can actually be considered a power trail. It may be a series but the caches are not all the same and thus, are probably hidden differently from each other. In otherwords, a cacher may have to actually do some real caching which would take up some of that valuable smiley attainment time that most power trails are placed for. :unsure:

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Maybe I don't understand the definition of a power trail... I've always thought it was considered a power trail if there are many caches (10 or more?) placed in a line with each cache roughly 528 feet apart.

 

If the defenition of a power trail is poorly hidden, poorly maintained, throw away caches 528 feet apart, then isn't that the same complaint against densley packed LPCs?

 

I'm not as much of an old-timer as some of th folks posting here... but I've been around for more than half the life of geocaching. While I don't like LPCs as a general rule... I have gone out and found many of them just to scratch that itch. They are also great for people like my father who (before he passed away) was getting into geocaching, but really couldn't walk more than 30 feet or so at a time. They do serve a purpose. Similarly, power trails (by either definition) serve a purpose. By my original definition, it will be a great way to introduce a bunch of great kids (and their parents) to geocaching. By the other definition... some people clearly enjoy it and would have been great for people like my dad who unfortunately couldn't do those 5k hikes in the woods.

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Maybe I don't understand the definition of a power trail... I've always thought it was considered a power trail if there are many caches (10 or more?) placed in a line with each cache roughly 528 feet apart.

 

If the defenition of a power trail is poorly hidden, poorly maintained, throw away caches 528 feet apart, then isn't that the same complaint against densley packed LPCs?

 

 

Your first definition is probably the most accurate. There used to be a definition that the reviewers followed before the PT gates were opened. Back in 2005 I tried to hide 5 caches along a 1 kilometer stretch of trail that were about 180-200m apart (greater then the 161m rule) and was told it would be considered a power trail and therefore not allowed. I had to make it a multi. A reviewer might be able to supply the PT definition they used back in 2005.

 

The result of removing the no-power-trail rule, has been that the vast majority of "many caches placed in a line each roughly 528 feet apart" became "poorly maintained, throw away caches, 528 feet apart", almost from day one of the PT ban lift.

Edited by L0ne R
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SuzyW, and HowieQ, had a flat tire on the way to the cache so they both DNFed it.

 

Why would someone log a DNF for something they didn't try and find.

 

As you have found out some think you can DNF without much or any searching.

If I get to GZ and search but don't find its a DNF....being in the same county ( or state ) as the cache doesn't qualify.

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SuzyW, and HowieQ, had a flat tire on the way to the cache so they both DNFed it.

 

Why would someone log a DNF for something they didn't try and find.

 

As you have found out some think you can DNF without much or any searching.

If I get to GZ and search but don't find its a DNF....being in the same county ( or state ) as the cache doesn't qualify.

 

Here's a common way of doing a power trail

 

Drive to the first cache on the trail.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

...repeat hundreds of times

Drive home

Post Found it logs for every cache close to where you stopped (even though you never left the vehicle).

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SuzyW, and HowieQ, had a flat tire on the way to the cache so they both DNFed it.

 

Why would someone log a DNF for something they didn't try and find.

 

As you have found out some think you can DNF without much or any searching.

If I get to GZ and search but don't find its a DNF....being in the same county ( or state ) as the cache doesn't qualify.

 

Here's a common way of doing a power trail

 

Drive to the first cache on the trail.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

...repeat hundreds of times

Drive home

Post Found it logs for every cache close to where you stopped (even though you never left the vehicle).

 

Snort a line of ivory soap to un-numb your mind after doing a PT ;-)

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SuzyW, and HowieQ, had a flat tire on the way to the cache so they both DNFed it.

 

Why would someone log a DNF for something they didn't try and find.

 

As you have found out some think you can DNF without much or any searching.

If I get to GZ and search but don't find its a DNF....being in the same county ( or state ) as the cache doesn't qualify.

 

Here's a common way of doing a power trail

 

Drive to the first cache on the trail.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

...repeat hundreds of times

Drive home

Post Found it logs for every cache close to where you stopped (even though you never left the vehicle).

 

Snort a line of ivory soap to un-numb your mind after doing a PT ;-)

 

So by that definition, would you consider this a PT?

 

Dahlgren Railroad Heritage Trail

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SuzyW, and HowieQ, had a flat tire on the way to the cache so they both DNFed it.

 

Why would someone log a DNF for something they didn't try and find.

 

As you have found out some think you can DNF without much or any searching.

If I get to GZ and search but don't find its a DNF....being in the same county ( or state ) as the cache doesn't qualify.

 

Here's a common way of doing a power trail

 

Drive to the first cache on the trail.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

...repeat hundreds of times

Drive home

Post Found it logs for every cache close to where you stopped (even though you never left the vehicle).

 

Snort a line of ivory soap to un-numb your mind after doing a PT ;-)

 

So by that definition, would you consider this a PT?

 

Dahlgren Railroad Heritage Trail

 

I wasn't attempting to define a power trail. That was just an observation made regarding how I've read that some teams handle doing a specific kind of power trail (one where someone can drive from cache to cache).

 

But since you asked...I wouldn't consider that example to be a power trail. To me (and this is just my personal definition) a "power trail" is more defined by the intent of the cache owner(s) than the number of caches. I see a power trail as "a lot" (and 14 caches isn't "a lot" by today's standards) of caches placed in a manner (easy hides, flat and accessible terrain, as close to each other as the guidelines allow) that facilitates a high find rate (niraD would call this a numbers trail).

 

There are a lot of "series" caches, some with quite a few caches in the series but they're not necessarily conducive for attaining a high find rate.

 

I found it interesting that one some recent local maps posted in another thread that many of them showed "strings" of caches in an already fairly dense area. It seems like, at least in some areas, cache ownership is no longer about placing a few well thought out hides, but placing a large number of caches all at once in order to appease the "we want more" crowd., effectively blocking large swaths of real estate from any other type of hide.

 

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Well I'm a tad confused now, I thought power trails are where a heap of geocaches were placed in a line so you can drive, ride or hike along, picking up heaps of caches along the way. There are some great power trails set by the bicycle riding set up in Townsville and also down here in Brisbane (Queensland) which involve many more than 20 geocaches in a line, following the bike trails. I've enjoyed these because they are an interesting walk or ride and the caches are not all same old boring thing, but imaginatively done; so for me tick all the boxes; you enjoy exploring a new area, you have a few challenging or interesting caches to find and you get to find heaps!

The thoughtlessly placed ones as described above don't sound like my cup of tea at all.

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At its SIMPLEST, yes...a power trail is nothing more than a string or grouping of caches. THAT'S IT!

 

Now, geocaching of course has many different ways folks play. YOU have the power to play as you wish so long as you do not violate the rules of the game or break the law.

 

- do it as a time trial

- do it as one per day (if you want to do a string of consistent days caching).

- do it as it is convenient when you are in the area

- do it on foot, do it on a bike, do it from a car. Do it from a pogo stick (I don't think that's been done before).

- complete it or not (all the caches from the grouping/string).

- DNF's are fine. If you didn't find one, it is a DNF. Whatever the normal rules of geocaching are for that, it applies. Trails don't change the rules. A DNF does NOT negate the finds of each of the others in the string/group.

 

Most important.....NO ONE can tell you how to do it. Geocaching allows for that, and even the cache owners have to respect that. They, have their own rights too.

Edited by TheWeatherWarrior
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In my opinion, the name "power trail" suggests that it's a string of caches placed so that a person can "power" through them. Their purpose,, to rack up finds in a short period of time while expending the least amount of effort. The containers are usually identical, hidden in the same manner, and placed to barely meet the 528' guideline. How many constitues a pt? Who's to say at this point, but there are usually a bunch.

 

A series could be a power trail but doesn't have to be. It would be a number of caches, possibly themed, but they could all be placed differently and/or with different types and sizes of containers. A person might have to actually do some searching for some or all of these. Getting alot of smilies in a short period of time would be tough because a person wouldn't be able to "power" through these very quickly.

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Maybe I don't understand the definition of a power trail... I've always thought it was considered a power trail if there are many caches (10 or more?) placed in a line with each cache roughly 528 feet apart.
That's the "old school" definition of a power trail. They might have been created by a single geocacher (or organized group of geocachers). They might have been created "organically" as unaffiliated geocachers filled in a popular trail (especially in parks that required geocaches to be hidden near existing trails).

 

There's one around here that has been used for years by the county parks department for its geocaching classes. In just a few hours, new geocachers can experience an assortment of different container types, camouflage techniques, and hide locations.

 

If the defenition of a power trail is poorly hidden, poorly maintained, throw away caches 528 feet apart,
That's the "new school" approach to a power trail, or what I call a "numbers run trail". Hundreds of interchangeable disposable caches are hidden along a road that allows geocachers to find hundreds of caches in a few hours.
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It just strikes me as odd that someone would log a DNF on a cache they didn't try and find because they couldn't/didn't get to the location.

 

I think that depends on the "why". If my car breaks down between home and parking, I woudln't log a DNF.

 

If the bridge between parking and the cache is washed out, a DNF will allert the CO and future finders to the problem, and that the cache may not be findable.

 

This makes perfect sense and with no disrespect intended towards Brian, I simply can't agree with his thinking. I left my Dr.'s office yesterday and set the GPS for a cache about three miles north. A half mile up, the intersection was blocked by a traffic accident and I was forced to turn in the direction of my home, so I simply continued on home. What point would posting a DNF on the cache serve to anyone? The reason that I didn't find it is because I didn't look and the reason why I didn't look is because I got diverted by a temporary situation that has nothing to do with hunting for the cache. Because I got diverted, I lost my patience and gave up before I even arrived at the place to park my car. I simply don't consider driving 1/2 mile in the direction of a cache and then changing my mind as hunting a cache.

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Maybe I don't understand the definition of a power trail... I've always thought it was considered a power trail if there are many caches (10 or more?) placed in a line with each cache roughly 528 feet apart.

 

If the defenition of a power trail is poorly hidden, poorly maintained, throw away caches 528 feet apart, then isn't that the same complaint against densley packed LPCs?

 

 

Your first definition is probably the most accurate. There used to be a definition that the reviewers followed before the PT gates were opened. Back in 2005 I tried to hide 5 caches along a 1 kilometer stretch of trail that were about 180-200m apart (greater then the 161m rule) and was told it would be considered a power trail and therefore not allowed. I had to make it a multi. A reviewer might be able to supply the PT definition they used back in 2005.

 

The result of removing the no-power-trail rule, has been that the vast majority of "many caches placed in a line each roughly 528 feet apart" became "poorly maintained, throw away caches, 528 feet apart", almost from day one of the PT ban lift.

 

Thanks for the reminder. I guess for me at least, the definition of power trail has changed. Today, I think of a power trail as a big series of caches that you drive between that was set up expressly for finding a large amount of caches in a short period of time. I no longer think of 15 caches along 3 miles of hiking trail as a power trail.

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So by that definition, would you consider this a PT?

 

Dahlgren Railroad Heritage Trail

There are some that would call the Coexist Series a power trail, even though the fastest recorded completion time for all 60 caches was two days.

 

I needed to test a few things with GSAK and needed a real cache. I would log a find and delete it (Didn't want my find counts messed up). Did this several times. Used something around 200 or so on Route 66. Next day I got an email from the CO asking if I was having trouble with their cache. Apparently they do read the emails on the separate account. The next time I tried that trick on another power trail my log did say I was testing and would be deleting the find. Didn't get an email that time.

On a related note, some time back I was asked to beta test a script for logging great big heaping gobs of caches. I used a sock, targeted a power trail with many hundreds of caches, and created one nonsensical log for all of them. The script worked, though it needed a bit of tweaking. Some time later, I deleted all the logs. I never heard a peep from the owner(s?), so I suspect they don't read their emails.

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I needed to test a few things with GSAK and needed a real cache. I would log a find and delete it (Didn't want my find counts messed up). Did this several times. Used something around 200 or so on Route 66. Next day I got an email from the CO asking if I was having trouble with their cache. Apparently they do read the emails on the separate account. The next time I tried that trick on another power trail my log did say I was testing and would be deleting the find. Didn't get an email that time.

On a related note, some time back I was asked to beta test a script for logging great big heaping gobs of caches. I used a sock, targeted a power trail with many hundreds of caches, and created one nonsensical log for all of them. The script worked, though it needed a bit of tweaking. Some time later, I deleted all the logs. I never heard a peep from the owner(s?), so I suspect they don't read their emails.

Quite a leap of faith there deputy. Just because they did not send you an email does not mean they did not read the logs.

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I needed to test a few things with GSAK and needed a real cache. I would log a find and delete it (Didn't want my find counts messed up). Did this several times. Used something around 200 or so on Route 66. Next day I got an email from the CO asking if I was having trouble with their cache. Apparently they do read the emails on the separate account. The next time I tried that trick on another power trail my log did say I was testing and would be deleting the find. Didn't get an email that time.

On a related note, some time back I was asked to beta test a script for logging great big heaping gobs of caches. I used a sock, targeted a power trail with many hundreds of caches, and created one nonsensical log for all of them. The script worked, though it needed a bit of tweaking. Some time later, I deleted all the logs. I never heard a peep from the owner(s?), so I suspect they don't read their emails.

Quite a leap of faith there deputy. Just because they did not send you an email does not mean they did not read the logs.

 

Of course, if they did read the logs, but didn't do anything about the obviously bogus logs, they're in violation of cache maintenance guidelines.

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SuzyW, and HowieQ, had a flat tire on the way to the cache so they both DNFed it.

 

Why would someone log a DNF for something they didn't try and find.

 

As you have found out some think you can DNF without much or any searching.

If I get to GZ and search but don't find its a DNF....being in the same county ( or state ) as the cache doesn't qualify.

 

Here's a common way of doing a power trail

 

Drive to the first cache on the trail.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

Drive approximately 528 feet.

Stop.

...repeat hundreds of times

Drive home

Post Found it logs for every cache close to where you stopped (even though you never left the vehicle).

 

If I can log it without opening the cache and writing my name even though I found it...

...then I can log it if I know roughly where it is but stop at every one along a power trail...

...but then I can drive the route and log them all because I drove the trail and know that every 528 there is a cache just off the road...

...but knowing this, I can log them all because I drove that route previously...

...but then, why not just skim through the route in Google Streetview...?

...or better yet, just look at each location on the GC cache map and think to myself "eh...they're all the same, right?" and log them all from the comfort of my own chair...

...so now I'm spending $30 so that I can put a big number by name on the Geocaching website and never really have to go outside and get nature all over my clean clothes. :anibad:

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I needed to test a few things with GSAK and needed a real cache. I would log a find and delete it (Didn't want my find counts messed up). Did this several times. Used something around 200 or so on Route 66. Next day I got an email from the CO asking if I was having trouble with their cache. Apparently they do read the emails on the separate account. The next time I tried that trick on another power trail my log did say I was testing and would be deleting the find. Didn't get an email that time.

On a related note, some time back I was asked to beta test a script for logging great big heaping gobs of caches. I used a sock, targeted a power trail with many hundreds of caches, and created one nonsensical log for all of them. The script worked, though it needed a bit of tweaking. Some time later, I deleted all the logs. I never heard a peep from the owner(s?), so I suspect they don't read their emails.

Quite a leap of faith there deputy. Just because they did not send you an email does not mean they did not read the logs.

 

Of course, if they did read the logs, but didn't do anything about the obviously bogus logs, they're in violation of cache maintenance guidelines.

 

Why are they obviously bogus? There a few youngsters around here that write nonsensical logs. Their names are in the log book so I assume they found the caches. At any rate, once you're at the disposable cache power trail stage in your caching career, does it really matter? If I owned a 1000 cache run and I think that someone logged them with out finding them, do I sit here and delete a 1000 logs off of a 1000 caches? Should I go and check all 1000 caches and see if they signed the logs? Secondly, if the fly on the wall has more integrity than me, why should anyone care if I dump the ET Hwy into GSAK and auto-log them all in the next hour? All of the reasons why someone shouldn't log a cache that they didn't find don't exist as the logging doesn't effect other cachers at all. Once we're at this point, all of the traditional ideas of what geocaching is have been thrown out the window. The Riffster logging and deleting 200 cache is a minor blip on the RADAR.

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