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Job 28 - God of Science


GregsonVaux
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job28english112011.png

 

The picture above shows the reverse side of the third coin that I was working on. This was to have been the Hebrew coin. The obverse was going to have biblical Hebrew passages from Job 28, which can be thought of as one of the chapters in the bible that celebrates science. This reverse side was going to show the same verses in English using a font that closely resembles Hebrew. The image in the center is the best current representation we have of the Milky Way Galaxy.

 

However, I was concerned that the letters were going to be too small and the mint confirmed this. They said that each letter must be 3mm high. And the coin as it is would need to be 4.8" in diameter. I tried paring down the passage as much as I could and making the galaxy as small as possible, but it was just losing too much of the original intention. I really hate to give up on this design, but I am not sure I can make it work with a 2" diameter canvas.

Edited by Flying Spaghetti Monster
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Another thought. Have the text start as it is, but then wrap the last line onto the edge of the coin. Where the letters cross over the edge could be flattened and have the flow seamless. Hope that makes sense.

 

Do you mean have the text run off the edge of the coin? I like that idea!

 

About a five inch coin. I did think about it, but it would be very expensive and I question that there would be enough of a market. I don't want to spend megabucks and not be able to cover costs. Then again, I have not actually priced it, maybe it is not as much as I think.

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Another thought. Have the text start as it is, but then wrap the last line onto the edge of the coin. Where the letters cross over the edge could be flattened and have the flow seamless. Hope that makes sense.

 

Do you mean have the text run off the edge of the coin? I like that idea!

 

About a five inch coin. I did think about it, but it would be very expensive and I question that there would be enough of a market. I don't want to spend megabucks and not be able to cover costs. Then again, I have not actually priced it, maybe it is not as much as I think.

 

Yeah. Have the last line wrap over and finish along the edge. Or have it start along the edge and then wrap over and finish on the face with the galaxy.

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Another thought. Have the text start as it is, but then wrap the last line onto the edge of the coin. Where the letters cross over the edge could be flattened and have the flow seamless. Hope that makes sense.

 

Do you mean have the text run off the edge of the coin? I like that idea!

 

About a five inch coin. I did think about it, but it would be very expensive and I question that there would be enough of a market. I don't want to spend megabucks and not be able to cover costs. Then again, I have not actually priced it, maybe it is not as much as I think.

 

Yeah. Have the last line wrap over and finish along the edge. Or have it start along the edge and then wrap over and finish on the face with the galaxy.

 

Oh, I see what you are saying. The problem is that the English text will be a translation of the Hebrew text and while the Hebrew will probably be a tiny bit shorter, it will still be nearly the same size. So, there isn't any room on the other side.

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Yeah. Have the last line wrap over and finish along the edge. Or have it start along the edge and then wrap over and finish on the face with the galaxy.

 

Oh, I see what you are saying. The problem is that the English text will be a translation of the Hebrew text and while the Hebrew will probably be a tiny bit shorter, it will still be nearly the same size. So, there isn't any room on the other side.

 

I may have not explained it right. I didn't mean wrap it over to the other side. I was trying to suggest finishing the lettering along the edge (rim). Or start the phrase on the edge and then wrap it up onto the side where you have it shown now. That would at least remove one revolution of letters on the face as shown and put it along the edge.

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Yeah. Have the last line wrap over and finish along the edge. Or have it start along the edge and then wrap over and finish on the face with the galaxy.

 

Oh, I see what you are saying. The problem is that the English text will be a translation of the Hebrew text and while the Hebrew will probably be a tiny bit shorter, it will still be nearly the same size. So, there isn't any room on the other side.

 

I may have not explained it right. I didn't mean wrap it over to the other side. I was trying to suggest finishing the lettering along the edge (rim). Or start the phrase on the edge and then wrap it up onto the side where you have it shown now. That would at least remove one revolution of letters on the face as shown and put it along the edge.

 

I have spent the last hour looking at my coin collection with a mm ruler trying to decide how small I can go with fonts. I am reluctant to make a coin larger than 2" not only because of potential cost, but also because it starts to get less like a coin and more like something else. A metal plate?

 

Let me ask the readers of this forum. Would you be interested in buying a 3" coin? Would you be interested in buying a 4" coin?

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You could also go with a photo insert. That way, you could get a clear image of the milky way AND the text. Some might object to the idea of using the photo insert (which is, essentially, a sticker printed on aluminum and then epoxied over), but I think that it can work pretty nicely in certain situations (like this one, especially a smaller scale like 1 3/4"). Surround the photo with a really nice frame/border/pattern and I think it would be very nice (although I think it would be nice with just a very thin raised edge, too).

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You could also go with a photo insert. That way, you could get a clear image of the milky way AND the text. Some might object to the idea of using the photo insert (which is, essentially, a sticker printed on aluminum and then epoxied over), but I think that it can work pretty nicely in certain situations (like this one, especially a smaller scale like 1 3/4"). Surround the photo with a really nice frame/border/pattern and I think it would be very nice (although I think it would be nice with just a very thin raised edge, too).

 

Hi Kat,

 

Thanks for giving input since I really like your designs and value your opinion. I'm going to stay away from photo inserts, because I question their longevity. Although I like the galaxy image, with this series, the text should always take center stage so that is what concerns me the most. I have been working on it for the last few hours and will be posting my modifications, Sso I would like to hear what you think about them.

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job28english112011color.png

 

I spent a while looking at lots of coins and decided that I can probably get away with 2mm letters. If the mint I am currently working with can't do it, then I will just shop around. If anyone thinks that 2mm is too small, please speak up, but I saw many examples of it working on coins.

 

When Harwell5 talked about going off the edge, it made me think of having the text go off the edge of the coin not in the way that he meant, but going off where the observer cannot see it. This gets rid of the blank area on the outside that a spiral naturally creates when put on a circle. It also gives the impression that the words continue on into infinity and that you are only seeing a portion of something larger. Does this hurt of help the design?

 

Besides the letters only being 2mm high, I am also concerned that they are too crowded. Does this coin look too claustrophobic? I tried to balance the need for large letters with the need for space between lines of text. Did I achieve this? I wanted to have a bit of a blackness of space feel with a brilliant galaxy in gold or silver metal. I did not use pure black since it is a bit too cold, but a slightly warmer midnight blue. My worry is that with all of the metal text, there is no feeling of space. Do others think that this is a problem?

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When I first started this topic, I really thought that the idea would not work since I had spent several days tweaking the design. However, with new inspiration, I might be able to get it minted after all. So, I have asked the moderator to change the title to the working name of the coin.

Edited by GregsonVaux
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When I first started this topic, I really thought that the idea would not work since I had spent several days tweaking the design. However, with new inspiration, I might be able to get it minted after all. So, I have asked the moderator to change the title to the working name of the coin.

Good to hear. As far as the new ideas, I don't think it hurts the design at all. I was just having a thought that yuo might have better luck with the smaller text if it can be recessed rather than raised metal? Take a look at Chris Rakes Nomad coins. I think the letters around the inner ring are 2MM, and at that size, you can also fit lot's more text each time around the spiral.

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job28english112011color.png

 

I spent a while looking at lots of coins and decided that I can probably get away with 2mm letters. If the mint I am currently working with can't do it, then I will just shop around. If anyone thinks that 2mm is too small, please speak up, but I saw many examples of it working on coins.

 

When Harwell5 talked about going off the edge, it made me think of having the text go off the edge of the coin not in the way that he meant, but going off where the observer cannot see it. This gets rid of the blank area on the outside that a spiral naturally creates when put on a circle. It also gives the impression that the words continue on into infinity and that you are only seeing a portion of something larger. Does this hurt of help the design?

 

Besides the letters only being 2mm high, I am also concerned that they are too crowded. Does this coin look too claustrophobic? I tried to balance the need for large letters with the need for space between lines of text. Did I achieve this? I wanted to have a bit of a blackness of space feel with a brilliant galaxy in gold or silver metal. I did not use pure black since it is a bit too cold, but a slightly warmer midnight blue. My worry is that with all of the metal text, there is no feeling of space. Do others think that this is a problem?

 

i think the choice of font as well as being all caps and very small, this will be next to impossible to read on a coin. even in the large pic you have posted the text is hard to read. if you want just a texture thing going on, then it is fine, but if the words are important, then i think on a 2" coin this is not going to work. take the pic you have posted and shrink it down to the actual size of the coin and see how it works. i did that and i cannot read it.

 

it is a lovely idea, but just too crowded, there is no feeling of "space."

 

only my 2¢ of course.

 

rsg

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i think the choice of font as well as being all caps and very small, this will be next to impossible to read on a coin. even in the large pic you have posted the text is hard to read. if you want just a texture thing going on, then it is fine, but if the words are important, then i think on a 2" coin this is not going to work. take the pic you have posted and shrink it down to the actual size of the coin and see how it works. i did that and i cannot read it.

 

it is a lovely idea, but just too crowded, there is no feeling of "space."

 

only my 2¢ of course.

 

rsg

 

That is exactly my fear. When I shrink the picture down to 2", I cannot read it either, but I am not sure that the monitor accurately reflects what the actual coin will look like, because there are other coins I have that are much clearer in real life than in photographs. That being said, I have always found Hebrew letters to be very hard to read and these letters, even though they are English (Latin), have the same problems. They all have the same square blockiness and just blend together. In that sense, this font really captures the feel of Hebrew.

 

I am not Jewish, so I had never been exposed to Hebrew letters before. However, through a strange set of circumstances, I found myself in Israel studying intensive Hebrew for a year. I did pretty well with the language, but I always thought that Hebrew letters gave up their secrets reluctantly. Hebrew is the language of eye strain.

 

Here is my question for all of you coin designers out there, do you find that shrinking the image down to coin size on a computer monitor really gives an accurate idea of what the final coin will look like when held in your hand? Can I really trust whether words will be legible based on the monitor image? If I was truly convinced that the letters are too small, I would not use this design, but when I look at coins in my collection that have letters the same size, they are easy to read.

Edited by GregsonVaux
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...but when I look at coins in my collection that have letters the same size, they are easy to read.

 

i understand really loving a design and not wanting to give it up, but the crux of the matter is not just the size, but the font itself. it might be easy to read that size if it was times new roman! so if you are comparing other coins with the same size, but different font, you are comparing one size apple to the same size orange. i am not a designer, so their opinions will be much more valid.

 

lara

Edited by RedShoesGirl
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...but when I look at coins in my collection that have letters the same size, they are easy to read.

 

i understand really loving a design and not wanting to give it up, but the crux of the matter is not just the size, but the font itself. it might be easy to read that size if it was times new roman! so if you are comparing other coins with the same size, but different font, you are comparing one size apple to the same size orange. i am not a designer, so their opinions will be much more valid.

 

lara

 

The font is a tough call. I was paying attention to complex versus simple fonts when I went through my coin collection, but this font really is different than all of the others. The mint I am dealing with says that the font must be 3mm, but the mints are well known to say that something cannot be done when in reality it can. It is too late to do anything now, but tomorrow I plan on actually printing out the design at real size to see if that clarifies things.

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...

The font is a tough call. I was paying attention to complex versus simple fonts when I went through my coin collection, but this font really is different than all of the others. The mint I am dealing with says that the font must be 3mm, but the mints are well known to say that something cannot be done when in reality it can. It is too late to do anything now, but tomorrow I plan on actually printing out the design at real size to see if that clarifies things.

 

sounds like a plan. check out the very unusual fonts at scriptorium fonts http://www.fontcraft.com/fontcraft/

 

i think you as a designer will really enjoy this site. and might find something useful for your coins.

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Yowza, what an awesome font site -- thanks, RSG!

 

you are quite welcome. i used to use some of their fonts when i was features editor at the paper i worked at. learned a few things about type. it is easier to read serif fonts than sans serif. notice the font your newspaper uses and pretty small at that. except for captions, those are usually sans serif.

 

all caps makes words harder to read than lower case and upper case. when i see coins with all upper case words i have a harder time deciphering the words. you know how we hate people "shouting" online and how hard that is to read.

 

one of the most fun thing in designing pages is using fonts judiciously. that is why i am always interested in how coins develop re the fonts used.

 

rsg

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Yowza, what an awesome font site -- thanks, RSG!

 

all caps makes words harder to read than lower case and upper case. when i see coins with all upper case words i have a harder time deciphering the words. you know how we hate people "shouting" online and how hard that is to read.

 

one of the most fun thing in designing pages is using fonts judiciously. that is why i am always interested in how coins develop re the fonts used.

 

rsg

 

Let me say more about fonts. I am a great lover of fonts and have countless installed on my computer. For this coin series, I am highlighting different alphabets, so far tengwar, runes, and Hebrew. I want the coins to be accessible, so I have all of the unknown texts repeated using Latin letters. However, I try to find a font that closely matches. In the case of the Hebrew, I searched out many fonts and this was the best that I could find. It is all caps and hard to read, but that is how biblical Hebrew is. It really does give the feeling of reading Hebrew. In fact, many of the letters are actual Hebrew letters that look enough like a Latin letter to be used in its place. For instance, the ‘w’ in this font is the ‘sh’ letter in Hebrew. The ‘I’ is the Hebrew ‘z’. Modern Hebrew still often uses the biblical font, but it also uses newer fonts that are easier to read. I stayed away from those, because they don’t have the right biblical feel.

 

For this coin, I want it to be readable, but the mood it sets is more important. In addition, I want people to work for its meaning in the same way that we have to work to get scientific truths.

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job28hebrew1212011redli.png

 

I finally finished designing the second side of the coin. However, it is still tentative being that some of the detail might be too small. The images all come from science or math. The red lines will be at mid-level and represent a fundamental concept in physics that creates some very beautiful and some extremely strange effects.

 

Like Dwarven Treasure, this coin will be produced in finishes that have never been seen on geocoins before.

 

Something interesting to note about Hebrew, the Hebrew side of the coin has nearly the same text as the English side, which shows what a compact language Hebrew is.

Edited by GregsonVaux
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The Job 28 - God of Science geocoin will soon be to the point of making samples and then the actual production. In celebration, I am holding a cointest, which will last for two weeks, or until someone posts the correct answer.

 

The reverse side of the coin (post #25) contains ten images from science and mathematics. The goal of this cointest is to identify specifically all ten of them. The winner will receive a free limited edition coin. The images start at the top and are numbered clockwise with the ninth image being the one in the center and the tenth image being the background lines. The first person to post all ten images correctly will win. Here is an example of what the answers should look like, but remember to label the images specifically. As you might guess, none of the answers in the example is correct. The cointest ends at midnight Eastern time, March 14. Since all entries will be posted publicly, the cointest should get easier as more entries are posted. Each person can only submit one entry per day.

 

***Example***

Image 1 - The table of Hebrew vowels

Image 2 - A diagram for a spring ball

Image 3 - A table lamp made of wire

Image 4 - An amphitheater

Image 5 - A spider

Image 6 - A dream catcher

Image 7 - A seashell

Image 8 - A flotilla of ships in a circular lake

Image 9 - An everlasting gobstopper

Image 10 - The ripples made from two stones being thrown in a pond

Edited by GregsonVaux
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Nice coincept!

 

But... I thought that Kini_ont's shipping cost cointest had way too many possible options, now this! I wonder if someone will ever get this right?

 

February 14th is a long time from now, though... :) Typo?

 

Perhaps you would coinsider giving us hints as in the game "Mastermind"? "You've got one correct item in the right place + two correct items but in the wrong place?" :)

 

First attempt (not sure I'm doing it right):

 

Image 1 - Phi

Image 2 - Omega

Image 3 - Delta

Image 4 - Psi

Image 5 - Lambda

Image 6 - Beta

Image 7 - Mu

Image 8 - Infinity

Image 9 - summation symbol

Image 10 - ECG line (heartbeat)

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Yes, That is a typo! The end date is March 14.

 

Nice coincept!

 

But... I thought that Kini_ont's shipping cost cointest had way too many possible options, now this! I wonder if someone will ever get this right?

 

February 14th is a long time from now, though... :) Typo?

 

Perhaps you would coinsider giving us hints as in the game "Mastermind"? "You've got one correct item in the right place + two correct items but in the wrong place?" :)

 

First attempt (not sure I'm doing it right):

 

Image 1 - Phi

Image 2 - Omega

Image 3 - Delta

Image 4 - Psi

Image 5 - Lambda

Image 6 - Beta

Image 7 - Mu

Image 8 - Infinity

Image 9 - summation symbol

Image 10 - ECG line (heartbeat)

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Nice coincept!

 

But... I thought that Kini_ont's shipping cost cointest had way too many possible options, now this! I wonder if someone will ever get this right?

 

February 14th is a long time from now, though... :) Typo?

 

Perhaps you would coinsider giving us hints as in the game "Mastermind"? "You've got one correct item in the right place + two correct items but in the wrong place?" :)

 

First attempt (not sure I'm doing it right):

 

Image 1 - Phi

Image 2 - Omega

Image 3 - Delta

Image 4 - Psi

Image 5 - Lambda

Image 6 - Beta

Image 7 - Mu

Image 8 - Infinity

Image 9 - summation symbol

Image 10 - ECG line (heartbeat)

 

I don't plan on giving hints, at least not yet, but I will say that I don't understand what your answers mean. The pictures don't show Greek letters. There are ten pictures (the last is the background) and you are answering the question, "What is that a picture of?"

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Oh, I'm so silly... Sorry... I hadn't noticed that a drawing of the back was already posted. So we have to say what the items on the drawing illustrate, right? I think I got it.

 

I thought that you might have missed the drawing and since other people might have the same problem, I edited to post to more clearly point people to the post that has the drawing of the back of the coin.

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OK, this version of the cointest is also fun! :)

 

Some of my answers I have confidence in, others I tried to make as believable as possible, just to confuse my opponents. :ph34r:

 

Image 1 - String theory

Image 2 - Electric fields

Image 3 - Optics

Image 4 - Magnetism

Image 5 - Space exploration

Image 6 - Glucose

Image 7 - The golden ratio

Image 8 - Mitosis

Image 9 - Trigonometry

Image 10 - Interference

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Ok.... Here goes my try:

 

1. Philosopher stone?

2. ATP

3. Pupillary refraction of light

4. Earth magnetic poles

5. Virus

6. Cycloadenosine?

7. The golden ration/ phi

8. Mitosis

9. Hexacontagon

10. A theoretical wormhole?

 

I know tht I didn't gt an "a" .... But hopefully at least a "c" would be a start. Thanks, zach

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1) ?

2) quark (nuclear physics)

3) optics

4) magnetism / magnetic field of earth

5) Bacteriophage

6) Benzene

7) golden ratio / Phi

8) (anaphase of) mitosis

9) geometry / small stellated dodecahedron

10) interference of two waves

 

Since noone replied I'll update my post

Edited by wenzelbub
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yay science!

 

Starting at the top and moving clockwise:

 

1. Standard Model of particle physics

2. That is the quark model of a proton, 2 up quarks and 1 down quark.

3. This is looking at optics, specifically through a concave, a convex, and then a concave lens. This setup is used at times to fix Spherical aberration in a telescope.

4. Van Allen belts, or magnetic field around the Earth.

5. bacteriophage

6. That would be a Benzene ring

7. Golden Ratio, or Phi

8. Mitosis, specifically anaphase

9. small stellated dodecahedron for geometry

10. Interference patterns of two point sources.

Edited by Ashallond
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yay science!

 

Starting at the top and moving clockwise:

 

1. Standard Model of particle physics

2. That is the quark model of a proton, 2 up quarks and 1 down quark.

3. This is looking at optics, specifically through a concave, a convex, and then a concave lens. This setup is used at times to fix Spherical aberration in a telescope.

4. Van Allen belts, or magnetic field around the Earth.

5. bacteriophage

6. That would be a Benzene ring

7. Golden Ratio, or Phi

8. Mitosis, specifically anaphase

9. small stellated dodecahedron for geometry

10. Interference patterns of two point sources.

 

Ding ding ding ding ding!!

 

Wow, so soon! I thought that the standard model would stump people for a while. So, Ashallond, do you know enough Hebrew to know what the letters mean? Did you need to look them up? or, were you able to guess the standard model and the proton just based on recognition of the shapes?

 

The only things that I wished you had phrased differently, are: I would have called #3 a telescope, but you did use that word. For #7, I would have used the phrase, 'golden spiral'. For #10, I wish that you had mentioned a double slit, since I was thinking of quantum mechanics. On the other hand, for the others, your specificity was even better than I had hoped. I was especially glad that you identified a stellated dodecahedron. I like this because I want the coin to be recognizable to people who have a passion for science.

 

I said that the prize would be a LE, however, for this coin I will be making quite a few editions and three of them, to my knowledge, will have finishes that no geocoin has used before. So I will let you pick from the different variations. The LE that I mentioned will be one of the new finishes and will be limited to 30 pieces, so you might want that one. I will get back to you when they have been shipped to me.

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I wanted to play in this cointest, but I wanted to see what others said and how long it would have taken. I would like to interject something though. While #10 is an interference pattern of two point sources, the correct definition of this pattern is a Hyperbolic Ripple not a Double Slit Ripple. The DS pattern is achieved when a wave in water is introduced into a barricade with two slits causing the wave to pass only through those two slits. The ripple effect is somewhat different. The pattern as you have on the coin is definitely two point sources touching the water simultaneously thus creating a Hyperbolic Ripple.

 

Great cointest. Enjoyed the great reads. Look forward to seeing this coin in hand someday.

 

Hyperbolic Ripple

waves1.jpg

 

Double Slit Ripple

double-slit-water-waves.png

Edited by Harwell5
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I wanted to play in this cointest, but I wanted to see what others said and how long it would have taken. I would like to interject something though. While #10 is an interference pattern of two point sources, the correct definition of this pattern is a Hyperbolic Ripple not a Double Slit Ripple. The DS pattern is achieved when a wave in water is introduced into a barricade with two slits causing the wave to pass only through those two slits. The ripple effect is somewhat different. The pattern as you have on the coin is definitely two point sources touching the water simultaneously thus creating a Hyperbolic Ripple.

 

Great cointest. Enjoyed the great reads. Look forward to seeing this coin in hand someday.

 

Hyperbolic Ripple

waves1.jpg

 

Double Slit Ripple

double-slit-water-waves.png

 

Yes, you are right, the pattern I drew really is not a proper double slit, so you get bonus points.

 

I am still curious, did you use any Hebrew knowledge to solve #1 and #2, or was it recognition of the overall patterns and shapes?

Edited by GregsonVaux
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Seeing as how I can't read Hebrew. It was based on prior knowledge of patterns/shapes/symbols. My curiosity is peaked though. I am going to have to translate the language now. Thanks a lot! :D:lol:

 

Other than the ten scientific images, the Hebrew on the back of the coin comes directly the biblical book of Job, chapter 28, in the original biblical Hebrew. The English in the front is the NIV translation. It is worth noting that Biblical Hebrew is a compact language so it takes up much less space than the English on the other side. Compact sounds good, but it really means that it is hard to read. Yiddish and modern Hebrew have longer words and use more words to express the same idea. In my opinion, the modern versions are more convenient.

 

In the benzene ring I used Hebrew Ks for carbon and Hs for hydrogen. I chose that symbol for carbon, as opposed to the other possible K sound, because it looks like a backward C and because the other letter actually represents a Q sound in classical Hebrew. The quarks and the standard model table were a bit more difficult because some of the particles are represented by vowels and classical Hebrew treats vowels differently. I had to rely on modern Hebrew and Yiddish to decide which Hebrew symbols to use for 'W', 'U', and 'e'. The standard model table also uses a mix of Greek and Latin letters, so I used formal printed Hebrew for Latin letters and script Hebrew for Greek letters.

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It is worth noting that Biblical Hebrew is a compact language so it takes up much less space than the English on the other side. Compact sounds good, but it really means that it is hard to read. Yiddish and modern Hebrew have longer words and use more words to express the same idea. In my opinion, the modern versions are more convenient.

 

The very reason I have not learned it. Have wanted to, but the complexity would take YEARS to even begin to comprehend the translation and then it could easily be misread. Too old to start now, but wished I had. It is a beautiful language.

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Complete disclosure. I have a degree in physics and coach a quiz bowl team.

 

The standard model and the proton I recognized from the shapes of the pictures. Once I checked that the same Hebrew letters were used in the patterns, it was easy to deduce the proton graph, since I wasn't sure if it was a proton, neutron, or electron without knowing which quarks it was.

 

Great contest and thanks!

Edited by Ashallond
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Complete disclosure. I have a degree in physics and coach a quiz bowl team.

 

The standard model and the proton I recognized from the shapes of the pictures. Once I checked that the same Hebrew letters were used in the patterns, it was easy to deduce the proton graph, since I wasn't sure if it was a proton, neutron, or electron without knowing which quarks it was.

 

Great contest and thanks!

 

I have a degree in physics too, so perhaps the coin is skewed a bit in that direction. My wife is a math teacher who likes the golden ratio, which mean that her handiwork can also be seen. Both she and I have a fondness for dodecahedrons but I really put it in the middle for her. When she and I were dating, I bought her a solid gold stellated dodecahedron that she wears around her neck. Ahh, the gifts that geeks give each other.

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