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L0ne.R

Photos/Images of bad cache containers

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What if you spray painted a tin with a anti rust paint?

I suspect you'd spend more on paint than you would for an ammo can.

Not unless you're able to get super cheap ammo cans, I suppose. I always spray my cans with flat olive rust paint, inside and out. I figure it will be better in long run, anyway. It doesn't use a whole spray paint can, so it should still cheaper than the ammo can.

Typically the paint sells for $3.99 at home Depot and the like. Ammo cans are $3.50 to $5.99 most of the time, although I have seen them for as much as $10.

 

I've tried tins before. They don't last regardless of how they are painted. I also have a couple of Altoids containers out there. One has been in place for more than 7 years, the other for almost 5. They aren't the best containers, but they do work.

*sigh* Ammo can prices have doubled in my town in the last year or two. Very frustrating. :angry:

All the more reason you should move to Colorado. :wub:

:laughing::wub:

 

Okay, we've hijacked this thread enough. :ph34r:

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I have somebody in my area that thinks that those stupid candy lipstick containers make CHOICE cache containers. They will then put a plastic baggie around the cache to make it water tight???

 

I just log my find with...

 

DPM (des palourdes mortes)

Les longs sanglots des palourdes mortes blessent mon coeur avec un languor monotone pendant qu'ils dansent à minuit

 

Yup, they get the dead clams!!!

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I think some food containers with screw on lids may be alright, such as the peanut butter jar. HOWEVER, I think I would suggest anything BUT peanut butter jars, only because of the potential for serious allergic reactions, even if cleaned well. (It only takes exposure to a minute quantity of PB.)

 

Guess I should stop leaving my peanut hulls around the geocaches I visit from all the peanuts I eat when I go geocaching. ;)

 

TGC

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In regards to ammo cans...

 

They do eventually rust. Albeit it takes a while. Ammo cans do leak I have come across my fair share that have wet logs inside them.

 

Now for regular sized and large sized containers I can't deny that overall they are a very good container. But they aren't that cheap. Especially if you have to have them send them to you. UPS charges are outrages. More than the cost of the cans in the first place.

 

Second is... At least here in the Dallas - Fort Worth area, if your ammo can isn't secured to something unmovable with a chain/cable & padlock. Then your ammo can WILL eventually get muggled!

 

With all that adding up & the economy. MOST non-premium geocachers can't afford ammo cans. If they could, they probably would have spent the $30 to become a PREMIUM member FIRST.

 

THere are ALOT of great containers that are very inexpensive and most of the time even "FREE", & with a little modification & work can become GREAT containers. Big problem is, there are alot of LAZY CO's who don't want to take the time to make needed modifications to these containers. This applies to all size types of caches as well.

 

I have obtained quite a few Pelican cases from bankruptcy sales that would make great geocaches. However, I personaly use them for other purposes. Pelican cases of all sizes tend to be a little on the expensive side when purchased new. Nice thing about Pelican cases is that you can always order replacement gaskets for them.

 

The other thing I think people forget too, is what is a BAD container in one location, can be a GREAT container in another. Sadly though I would say their are alot of CO's who don't think about the placement of their containers and location as if they go together.

 

Some containers are great containers, but when geocachers don't properly screw the lid on tight, then it will leak! Example the water bottle cache. I went to one water bottle cache where the lid wasn't even on it! Thank god it hadn't rained yet, so the log was still dry! (yes I replaced the lid)

 

Here is what kills containers in the outdoors.

 

1. UV light (Sunlight) will destroy 98% of all plastics over time. The few plastics that won't deterioate (sp) over time are those that have been designed to resist UV. So if your container will be exposed to direct sunlight & its plastic. It won't last long. Most paint will aslo deterioate from UV sunlight. Sit a ammo can out in direct sunlight for a year or two. Watch the paint bubble. So the main trick here is... Keep your container whatever it is OUT OF DIRECT SUNLIGHT!

 

2. Material Fatigue. This applies to metal and plastic. The more it's bent, pushed, prodded and played with, the weaker it will become. One other thing that creates material fatigue. Temp changes. If your in an area where at nights its 50 degrees and during hte day its 100. Your container will experiance massice material fatigue very quickly. Cheap containers in general don't do well with this type of issue. Those items using plastics made for the outdoors will do much better. Matchstick holders for example, Hidden Key containers.

 

3. Moisture. Very few places in the USA don't get any percipitation during the year (Snow, rain). Even those places that don't get any rain a year, will have issues with condensation. So simply put your cache needs to be waterproof & even if it is. You should have your log in a plastic bag as well if possible. Wet logs can be allivated by simply using waterproof paper logs. But those aren't very inexpensive. In some cases even cost more than the cost of the container.

 

There are many other factors that can impact the viability of a cache container. Animals, other enviromental items, even some man made causes.

 

Suffice it to say that I hope all of us who have read and responded to the thread won't use bad containers.

 

Sadly though... MOST geocachers don't read the forums, A larger percentage of NON-premium members don't read the forums either.

 

I wonder though... If you were to compare bad containers placed by PREMIUM members to bad containers placed by NON-PRemium members whioch group would have the MOST bad containers? My bet... the NON-Premium members.

 

TGC

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Adding another example of a bad container. This one belongs to the tin category. I've seen a few of these....the tin lunchbox.

 

GC1X7AQ_20110725_rustylunchbox.jpg

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Found another bad idea for a container today....a dollar store wooden treasure chest:

 

gc27wte-woodenbox.jpg

gc27wtebox-open.jpg

 

It was planted on May 2 2010. Mold is starting to build on the inside of the container.

There's no seal, the cache is not watertight. The contents are being protected by a zippered baggie. The slider/zipper piece had come off and was sitting in the bottom of the container.

 

Hey, you found my cache! <embarrased>

 

I hid one just like this with expectations of replacements being needed. But, still, it's cute, and cheap to replace. Lock n locks get boring after a while. The log is inside a film can which is inside a plastic easter egg. The cache is sheltered under trees and also covered with bark.

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Besides the allergic reaction risks, I don't think you can truly ever get the food smell out of plastic containers enough that an animal - especially a raccoon - will overlook it. No matter how well you clean than peanut butter jar a four legged cache bandit will try to chew on it.

 

Your theory doesn't hold up to my experience. Peanut butter jars are arguably the single most common cache container in my area (Minnesota. We have raccoons) . I have found thousands of them and I can only think of maybe two of them that have been damaged by animals when I found them.

 

[Edited to add: Oops! I didn't check the date on the thread I was responding to.]

 

 

.

Edited by knowschad

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Besides the allergic reaction risks, I don't think you can truly ever get the food smell out of plastic containers enough that an animal - especially a raccoon - will overlook it. No matter how well you clean than peanut butter jar a four legged cache bandit will try to chew on it.

 

Your theory doesn't hold up to my experience. Peanut butter jars are arguably the single most common cache container in my area (Minnesota. We have raccoons) . I have found thousands of them and I can only think of maybe two of them that have been damaged by animals when I found them.

 

[Edited to add: Oops! I didn't check the date on the thread I was responding to.]

 

 

Yes. I have also noticed how well peanut butter jars hold up. The thing that gets chewed up a bit is the camo duct tape, which is true for anything covered in camo tape placed where rodents reside.

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Besides the allergic reaction risks, I don't think you can truly ever get the food smell out of plastic containers enough that an animal - especially a raccoon - will overlook it. No matter how well you clean than peanut butter jar a four legged cache bandit will try to chew on it.

 

Your theory doesn't hold up to my experience. Peanut butter jars are arguably the single most common cache container in my area (Minnesota. We have raccoons) . I have found thousands of them and I can only think of maybe two of them that have been damaged by animals when I found them.

 

 

In my experience, though, PB jars don't seal out moisture very well, and tend to get damp/moldy inside.

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Besides the allergic reaction risks, I don't think you can truly ever get the food smell out of plastic containers enough that an animal - especially a raccoon - will overlook it. No matter how well you clean than peanut butter jar a four legged cache bandit will try to chew on it.

 

Your theory doesn't hold up to my experience. Peanut butter jars are arguably the single most common cache container in my area (Minnesota. We have raccoons) . I have found thousands of them and I can only think of maybe two of them that have been damaged by animals when I found them.

 

 

In my experience, though, PB jars don't seal out moisture very well, and tend to get damp/moldy inside.

 

The few Peanut Butter Jars I've seen in our area have been in pretty good shape. I'd classify them as above average.

 

No pictures but someone in our area just placed a chewing tobacco can as a container.

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Peanut butter jars are arguably the single most common cache container in my area

We have a local legend that has many hides in the Ocala National Forest, who has become associated with peanut butter jars. Though technically, they never held peanut butter, (I think he said they contained pickled eggs?), the size and shape are consistent with a jar of Jiffy, and the resemblance has led to the association. They have even earned the local nickname of "ICM Peanut Butter Jars". They work pretty well. On rare occasion, some critter, (bear, coyote, raccoon, rodent, etc), will gnaw on one, though I suspect food odors have little to do with it. I'm thinking that we are leaving a scent cocktail every time we find them, and this might lead to them being chewed? Maybe? :unsure:

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Not a bad container story, but we've had someone stealing ammo boxes around here.

Kinda strange...

Dumping the contents and taking the container.

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Besides the allergic reaction risks, I don't think you can truly ever get the food smell out of plastic containers enough that an animal - especially a raccoon - will overlook it. No matter how well you clean than peanut butter jar a four legged cache bandit will try to chew on it.

 

Your theory doesn't hold up to my experience. Peanut butter jars are arguably the single most common cache container in my area (Minnesota. We have raccoons) . I have found thousands of them and I can only think of maybe two of them that have been damaged by animals when I found them.

 

 

In my experience, though, PB jars don't seal out moisture very well, and tend to get damp/moldy inside.

 

My experience differs, I'm afraid. And, of course, no container will keep out rain or snow that gets in while the cacher is signing the log.

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Besides the allergic reaction risks, I don't think you can truly ever get the food smell out of plastic containers enough that an animal - especially a raccoon - will overlook it. No matter how well you clean than peanut butter jar a four legged cache bandit will try to chew on it.

 

Your theory doesn't hold up to my experience. Peanut butter jars are arguably the single most common cache container in my area (Minnesota. We have raccoons) . I have found thousands of them and I can only think of maybe two of them that have been damaged by animals when I found them.

 

 

In my experience, though, PB jars don't seal out moisture very well, and tend to get damp/moldy inside.

I've noticed that as well, and we live in the desert.

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Besides the allergic reaction risks, I don't think you can truly ever get the food smell out of plastic containers enough that an animal - especially a raccoon - will overlook it. No matter how well you clean than peanut butter jar a four legged cache bandit will try to chew on it.

 

Your theory doesn't hold up to my experience. Peanut butter jars are arguably the single most common cache container in my area (Minnesota. We have raccoons) . I have found thousands of them and I can only think of maybe two of them that have been damaged by animals when I found them.

 

 

In my experience, though, PB jars don't seal out moisture very well, and tend to get damp/moldy inside.

I've noticed that as well, and we live in the desert.

Ahh, the desert. When I visited your side in april...the desert, the sand dunes! (especially the big one on the apple loop trail) It was so fun...

 

I'm glad I was ignorant of Ticks when I did that "hooters" cache.

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Besides the allergic reaction risks, I don't think you can truly ever get the food smell out of plastic containers enough that an animal - especially a raccoon - will overlook it. No matter how well you clean than peanut butter jar a four legged cache bandit will try to chew on it.

 

Your theory doesn't hold up to my experience. Peanut butter jars are arguably the single most common cache container in my area (Minnesota. We have raccoons) . I have found thousands of them and I can only think of maybe two of them that have been damaged by animals when I found them.

 

 

In my experience, though, PB jars don't seal out moisture very well, and tend to get damp/moldy inside.

I've noticed that as well, and we live in the desert.

Ahh, the desert. When I visited your side in april...the desert, the sand dunes! (especially the big one on the apple loop trail) It was so fun...

 

I'm glad I was ignorant of Ticks when I did that "hooters" cache.

I love the sand dunes on the loop trail. Quite pretty, especially set against the rocks, mountains and Columbia River. :)

 

I still haven't found the Hooters cache, every time I've visited my cache nearby, it's been disabled. Bad timing.

 

I'm fortunate in that ticks rarely like me. I was doing a lot of walking on that side of the trail early this summer, walking under and brushing up against the sagebrush, and I would go home and inspect myself all over and not find anything, thank goodness. :anibad:

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Other than that, I've seen lots of disposable gladware. Bad stuff.

 

Here's are a couple of pictures of gladware, in case newbies don't know what gladware looks like:

 

prodshot_gladware.jpg

 

img7078thumbmm2.jpg

 

But what exactly is it in this gladware container?

 

Did you post a picture of the wrong one? :blink:

its obviously a stash, but what KIND of stash ;)

 

The kind of stash I used to hide in film canisters when I was in college :rolleyes:

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That wasn't gladware. It should also be noted that placing the cache into a plastic bag isn't a new phenomenon or one that is limited to new players.

That's quite right. Around my area 99% of them are :D.

 

And I hate it when someone logs on my hides "... there was no plastic bag, so I used one to protect the container ..." aaaaaaggggggggg crazy2.gifcrazy2.gif

 

Oh, my goodness. I think I would stop caching if that was the case here. We have enough of the bison tubes with wet logs to have already cost me one of our favorite tag a longs. If we had to search through trash bags to get a cache I think I would have lost all of my caching buddies! :angry::surprise:

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Here is the description: You will need to know where this is if you want directions around here. This is easy terrain and should be an easy find as well. Your looking for large glass jar that locks. It is full of goodies from my other hobbie that all should enjoy good luck.

 

acb4f3e6-dd08-450c-a92b-6c51eff818b6.jpg

068864f4-2711-4d3b-b896-5af4b5f55afb.jpg

b63c1a4d-8a35-4f00-9242-9869a2ed679e.jpg

Edited by AmphibianTrackers

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Sorry to say, Anything made by Sterilite (usually found at WalMart, Target, etc..) get my vote for bad choice. The plastic seems over-heated and not cold-weather friendly. I've found, and sorry to say, tagged for maintenance required, many a sterilite box The ones with the roll-over locks on the lids, are the worse! the lock tabs are hinged by holes through the lid, making it leak.. I've also found many cracked and broken just by weathering. It's usually a harder plastic than most, which makes for the brittle breakage. I wish there was still a local dealer for Lock-n-Lock, Walmart seems to have given them up for Sterilite, Not sure who makes the ones Ocean-State Job-Lot gets theirs from, but the recent blue-sealed ones, I'm finding are pretty brittle too. (and if I'm not mistaken, The Official containers sold in the GC store, are clones of the green-sealed version, which are a lot more flexible plastic.) I just finished making a simple robot with one of the blue-sealed containers, and the main part has a lot of cracks where I tried cutting holes for motors, so I'd avoid those.

 

Stephen (gelfling6)

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Here is the description: You will need to know where this is if you want directions around here. This is easy terrain and should be an easy find as well. Your looking for large glass jar that locks. It is full of goodies from my other hobbie that all should enjoy good luck.

 

acb4f3e6-dd08-450c-a92b-6c51eff818b6.jpg

 

 

glass, a terrible, terrible choice for a caching container.

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Here is the description: You will need to know where this is if you want directions around here. This is easy terrain and should be an easy find as well. Your looking for large glass jar that locks. It is full of goodies from my other hobbie that all should enjoy good luck.

 

acb4f3e6-dd08-450c-a92b-6c51eff818b6.jpg

 

 

glass, a terrible, terrible choice for a caching container.

 

Clip & Locks aren't all that great either, found this about an hour ago ;

 

photo2ol.jpg

 

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

 

Both look like it was the job of a wild animal.

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Clip & Locks aren't all that great either, found this about an hour ago ;

 

photo2ol.jpg

 

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

 

That looks like a lock n lock to me? :unsure: They're usually great, perhaps this one had a heavy rock put on top of it or like the previous poster said it was ravaged by a wild animal. I'm surprised the lid is in such good shape. It looks exceptionally clean too.

Edited by The_Incredibles_

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Clip & Locks aren't all that great either, found this about an hour ago ;

 

photo2ol.jpg

 

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Was that in England? I've found there's a very wide variation on the quality and type of plastic used in different types of lock & locks, some plastics are brittle when cold and so if dropped on a rock (easy if it's raining) that could happen. I dropped a (different type) of Lock & Lock on our (stone) kitchen floor and it broke like that. (It was empty, thankfully!)

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Here is the description: You will need to know where this is if you want directions around here. This is easy terrain and should be an easy find as well. Your looking for large glass jar that locks. It is full of goodies from my other hobbie that all should enjoy good luck.

 

acb4f3e6-dd08-450c-a92b-6c51eff818b6.jpg

 

 

glass, a terrible, terrible choice for a caching container.

 

Clip & Locks aren't all that great either, found this about an hour ago ;

 

photo2ol.jpg

 

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

 

Both look like it was the job of a wild animal.

a mason jar? tsk tsk

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photo2ol.jpg

That looks like a lock n lock to me? :unsure:

I don't think it is. Lock & Locks have protuberances along the rim that actually poke through a slot in the fold over tabs. I zoomed in on the edge and I'm not seeing those. I think it's a knock off. Maybe? Unless I'm getting blind in my old age? :unsure: My Wally World stopped selling true Lock & Locks and started selling ones with flaps very much like the one pictured. They wouldn't even stay snapped down in the store, in a controlled environment.

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Yes, that was a mason jar. Sadly, it was supposed to have contained a tb. Also, the CO hasn't logged in our responded to my needs maintenance record when I clearly left the images of how the cache was ruined. It was in an area where large machinery is parked so we think it may have even been run over. In any case it is dangerous.

 

Today, we found a baggy in a tree cache. It was so full of worms and such that we were so grossed out we didn't even make it to the log. YUCK!!! :o:anibad:

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Clip & Locks aren't all that great either, found this about an hour ago ;

 

photo2ol.jpg

 

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Was that in England? I've found there's a very wide variation on the quality and type of plastic used in different types of lock & locks, some plastics are brittle when cold and so if dropped on a rock (easy if it's raining) that could happen. I dropped a (different type) of Lock & Lock on our (stone) kitchen floor and it broke like that. (It was empty, thankfully!)

 

Yep it was 'oop north. It did feel like a decent quality clip-lock and not the cheapo ones you can find from pound shops or home bargain etc. Not sure if it was a wild animal, looked like something rather heavy had been dropped on it, as two of the clips were missing from the lid too.

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Clip & Locks aren't all that great either, found this about an hour ago ;

 

photo2ol.jpg

 

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Was that in England? I've found there's a very wide variation on the quality and type of plastic used in different types of lock & locks, some plastics are brittle when cold and so if dropped on a rock (easy if it's raining) that could happen. I dropped a (different type) of Lock & Lock on our (stone) kitchen floor and it broke like that. (It was empty, thankfully!)

 

Yep it was 'oop north. It did feel like a decent quality clip-lock and not the cheapo ones you can find from pound shops or home bargain etc. Not sure if it was a wild animal, looked like something rather heavy had been dropped on it, as two of the clips were missing from the lid too.

 

Maybe a cow trod on it? :rolleyes:

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It was at the side of a road in a bush so I doubt it. Can you imagine the look on our faces when we opened the camo bag and found it full of shards of plastic!

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Besides the allergic reaction risks, I don't think you can truly ever get the food smell out of plastic containers enough that an animal - especially a raccoon - will overlook it. No matter how well you clean than peanut butter jar a four legged cache bandit will try to chew on it.

 

Your theory doesn't hold up to my experience. Peanut butter jars are arguably the single most common cache container in my area (Minnesota. We have raccoons) . I have found thousands of them and I can only think of maybe two of them that have been damaged by animals when I found them.

 

 

In my experience, though, PB jars don't seal out moisture very well, and tend to get damp/moldy inside.

 

My experience differs, I'm afraid. And, of course, no container will keep out rain or snow that gets in while the cacher is signing the log.

 

And when someone signs a log in the pouring rain, then puts it back into a water proof container--well then, the water never gets out.

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Another Ziploc disaster...

 

02c451f0-56eb-4a7c-987e-a70edf47c905.jpg

 

Wow, what's with the reviewers in your area? This cache has 8 Needs Maintenance logs going back to 2008. And 1 Needs Archiving July 2009. The CO last logged in October 2008. Might be time to post another NA. Makes me appreciate the reviewers in Ontario.

Edited by Lone R

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I've now come across three caches that have used a container made out of wood to camouflage it like the surrounding area. While these all looked like they were great containers at some point, wood rots. Here's my favorite:

 

jKuYF.jpg

 

The bottom has rotted out and the containers was crawling with slugs, ants and earwigs. Pretty nasty. The contents of the film canister were wet as well.

Edited by pgarrett

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Another Ziploc disaster...

 

02c451f0-56eb-4a7c-987e-a70edf47c905.jpg

I would say to submit a "Needs Archived", and once it gets archived, haul that stinker out of there, but the "It might be listed on another site so you have no right to touch it" crowd might balk at such a suggestion.

 

Edit to add; Nevermind. I see you already replaced it.

Edited by Clan Riffster

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I have never ever come across a 35mm that was wet on the inside. They work just fine for me. They seal perfectly.

 

We found several just today that were soaked on the inside.

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1. UV light (Sunlight) will destroy 98% of all plastics over time. The few plastics that won't deterioate (sp) over time are those that have been designed to resist UV. So if your container will be exposed to direct sunlight & its plastic. It won't last long.

(Yeah, I know this was posted months ago.) While I agree with your statements about photochemical reactions, you go too far with the "98%". Basically polyethylene, especially LDPE but also HDPE, deteriorates badly in sunlight. But PET/PETE holds up very well -- that's peanut butter jars. (PB jar lids are some other material but they seem to hold up too.) Polypropylene (PP) holds up in sunlight as long as it's reasonably thick and well made. Vinyl (PVC) seems to do well in practice, although the instructions on PVC pipe say not to install exposed to sunlight IIRC. ABS is good. Polycarbonate is good.

 

I found one cache in a container which originally held microwave frozen food. The top was OK -- it's PETE. Don't know what the bottom is; it was already cracked. Of course it never sealed. Didn't get a picture of it. It finally got archived.

 

Here's an example of what happens to Gladware-type containers.

013b9d52-f2ac-428d-a000-5d9a854995f0.jpg

This one falls in the category of thin and poorly made -- these containers are usually PP, which in theory should hold up well, but in this thinness and quality do not. The photo doesn't even show the many shards of the blue lid that were lying around on the ground. The owner did replace this one and AFAIK it's doing well, though it hasn't been found in about 21 months ... hey, does anyone need a 21-month cache for a challenge?

 

Edward

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I have never ever come across a 35mm that was wet on the inside. They work just fine for me. They seal perfectly.

Interesting to note that a container that is, quite possibly the crappiest one available, in my geographic region, could do well in another part of the country. I'm thinking your region must be a lot less humid than mine. Though I do have a local friend who believes film cans are the bees knees. He's an FTF junkie, which might have an impact on his observations. I pointed out that, to an FTF hound, a Chinese take out container might seem OK, since they usually find it within a few minutes of being posted.

 

Personally, I've never come across a (black & gray) film can that was dry inside. Prior to seeing your post, I thought their suckiness was universal. I even took the advice of a forum regular who suggested they were fine if placed in an area that was protected from direct contact with the elements, using a film can for my "Always Lame" LPC cache. When I archived it, the log was damp. The seal is horrendous.

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I have never ever come across a 35mm that was wet on the inside. They work just fine for me. They seal perfectly.

Interesting to note that a container that is, quite possibly the crappiest one available, in my geographic region, could do well in another part of the country. I'm thinking your region must be a lot less humid than mine. Though I do have a local friend who believes film cans are the bees knees. He's an FTF junkie, which might have an impact on his observations. I pointed out that, to an FTF hound, a Chinese take out container might seem OK, since they usually find it within a few minutes of being posted.

 

Personally, I've never come across a (black & gray) film can that was dry inside. Prior to seeing your post, I thought their suckiness was universal. I even took the advice of a forum regular who suggested they were fine if placed in an area that was protected from direct contact with the elements, using a film can for my "Always Lame" LPC cache. When I archived it, the log was damp. The seal is horrendous.

 

it really depends on where is hidden

we found one just this weekend that was placed on august 2009 and hasn't been found since april 2010

 

this is Canada and the temperatures and humidity are quite extreme between winter and summer

the log was bone dry after all this time being exposed to the elements

 

001-25.jpg

 

003_backup_20110814202139.jpg

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Another Ziploc disaster...

 

02c451f0-56eb-4a7c-987e-a70edf47c905.jpg

 

Wow, what's with the reviewers in your area? This cache has 8 Needs Maintenance logs going back to 2008. And 1 Needs Archiving July 2009. The CO last logged in October 2008. Might be time to post another NA. Makes me appreciate the reviewers in Ontario.

 

23 logged smileys since the NA was posted. What's a reviewer to do? I had the same issue with a local gladware cache with an absentee owner. Someone dropped a blank log sheet and cachers spent the summer logging their finds. My reviewer's POV was that if it was getting "valid" finds, why archive it?

 

Besides, it looks like there is a brand new L&L there now.

Edited by Don_J

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I have never ever come across a 35mm that was wet on the inside. They work just fine for me. They seal perfectly.

Interesting to note that a container that is, quite possibly the crappiest one available, in my geographic region, could do well in another part of the country. I'm thinking your region must be a lot less humid than mine. Though I do have a local friend who believes film cans are the bees knees. He's an FTF junkie, which might have an impact on his observations. I pointed out that, to an FTF hound, a Chinese take out container might seem OK, since they usually find it within a few minutes of being posted.

 

Personally, I've never come across a (black & gray) film can that was dry inside. Prior to seeing your post, I thought their suckiness was universal. I even took the advice of a forum regular who suggested they were fine if placed in an area that was protected from direct contact with the elements, using a film can for my "Always Lame" LPC cache. When I archived it, the log was damp. The seal is horrendous.

 

A black and gray film can under a lamp post skirt will do quite well in Southern California. Put one in landscaping with nightly sprinklers and you have a disaster. We have one rainy season, winter. I have found film cans in the hills during the summer that were completely dry, yet showed evidence that they were completely wet. The fact that they not only get wet, but dry out without intervention leads me to believe that they don't seal very well.

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Another Ziploc disaster...

 

02c451f0-56eb-4a7c-987e-a70edf47c905.jpg

 

Wow, what's with the reviewers in your area? This cache has 8 Needs Maintenance logs going back to 2008. And 1 Needs Archiving July 2009. The CO last logged in October 2008. Might be time to post another NA. Makes me appreciate the reviewers in Ontario.

 

23 logged smileys since the NA was posted. What's a reviewer to do? I had the same issue with a local gladware cache with an absentee owner. Someone dropped a blank log sheet and cachers spent the summer logging their finds. My reviewer's POV was that if it was getting "valid" finds, why archive it?

 

Besides, it looks like there is a brand new L&L there now.

 

We've got a different reviwer since that NA. It's shameful that it was left in that state for so long. Anyway, it did remove the container and put a new one. I try not to do that too much as it would get expensive, but I figure once/month won't break the bank. Ideally I'd like to adopt formally, but probably won't happen as I can't get ahold of the CO.

 

Not sure what our reviewer would do in this situation, I didn't ask her.

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Besides the allergic reaction risks, I don't think you can truly ever get the food smell out of plastic containers enough that an animal - especially a raccoon - will overlook it. No matter how well you clean than peanut butter jar a four legged cache bandit will try to chew on it.

 

Your theory doesn't hold up to my experience. Peanut butter jars are arguably the single most common cache container in my area (Minnesota. We have raccoons) . I have found thousands of them and I can only think of maybe two of them that have been damaged by animals when I found them.

 

[Edited to add: Oops! I didn't check the date on the thread I was responding to.]

 

 

A quick blast of spray paint to the interior of a clean PB jar takes care of any residual smell. Every time I open it all I can smell is paint. I'll be hiding it soon now that I know my dogs who are peanut butter freaks won't have anything to do with it. I'd love to show the camo attached to it, but I'm not ready to give that away...

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Here's are a couple of pictures of gladware, in case newbies don't know what gladware looks like:

 

prodshot_gladware.jpg

 

img7078thumbmm2.jpg

 

Does this one come with papers?

MULLY

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After reading through this thread, and many others concerning containers, I see that a lot of ammo cans go missing on a regular basis. Any chance some owner of a military surplus store is geocaching? Selling ammo cans then going out and getting them back and selling them again? Doesn't sound too far fetched to me.

MULLY

Edited by mullyman

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Are Peanut Butter containers recommended? Seen quite a few out there and they seem to work very well. My kids eat a lot of PB, lol.

 

I found one today that had water in it. Log was in a zip lock and was so wet I could barely sign it. Ick. I don't like peanut butter jars...they S.U.X. :D

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Yet another altoid tin bites the dust. This was rusted shut and I broke my thumb nail prying it open.

 

IMG_20110928_121228.jpg

 

It's too bad. The CO took a log and cut a part out to perfectly fit the altoids can. It was a decent cache, besides the tin.

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