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Most important reason to remove ammo can markings!


root1657
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OK, I've seen a lot and had a few conversations about the importance of removing 'military markings' from military type containers, so I thought I'd throw this ittle tidbit out there for the sake of education.

 

In addition to the importance of helping to keep the unknowing from being bothered by any military marks on an ammo can, there is a very valid and important military reason to make sure that the lot number on the ammo can specifically is 'destroyed'. If there is ever any kind of 'accident' involving ammo, the entire lot may be pulled from service world wide until the ammo has been tested and deemed not to be the cause of the accident. On firing lines this is a big deal because any ammo from any open lot number may have been involved, so all open lots are considered suspect. When ammo from a can is expended the lot number should then be obliterated to indicate that the ammo from that can was fine, and to prevent any issue where the entire lot could be pulled from service without proper cause.

 

I dont know how so many ammo cans get out on the market with the lot numbers still on them, but please please please, if you have an ammo can with the lot number still on it, paint over, scratch out, or otherwise 'obliterate' the lot number. I know there is an astronomical improbability of one of these cache cans ever being involved in some type of incident that would get ammo pulled from service, but still, not impossible, and easy to prevent.

 

Thanks, and keep on cachin!

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I can't imagine how a civilion activity not even involving ammo could ever get military ammo pulled from service. But, removing ALL military markings is still a very good idea. After sanding off the markings, I also spray them Black over the Olive Drab. Makes them more stelthy and less military?

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Out of curiosity, where is the lot number located?

 

I only have one handy, but all of the ammo cans I get from our surplus store have their markings, although they are largely Vietnam war era. The one I happen to have handy says this:

 

100 CTRG .50 CAL

LINK M9

1API MK211 - 1AP MK263

1API MK211 - AAP MK263

1API DIM TRACER MK 257

LC-06J625L019

 

My guess would be the last line, right?

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When ammo from a can is expended the lot number should then be obliterated to indicate that the ammo from that can was fine, and to prevent any issue where the entire lot could be pulled from service without proper cause.

 

"Sarge, looks like we're gonna have to pull the ammo. The factory seems to have placed toys in out boxes instead of the usual....."

 

Exactly...

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Out of curiosity, where is the lot number located?

 

I only have one handy, but all of the ammo cans I get from our surplus store have their markings, although they are largely Vietnam war era. The one I happen to have handy says this:

 

100 CTRG .50 CAL

LINK M9

1API MK211 - 1AP MK263

1API MK211 - AAP MK263

1API DIM TRACER MK 257

LC-06J625L019

 

My guess would be the last line, right?

 

I'd cover all of them.

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When ammo from a can is expended the lot number should then be obliterated to indicate that the ammo from that can was fine, and to prevent any issue where the entire lot could be pulled from service without proper cause.

 

"Sarge, looks like we're gonna have to pull the ammo. The factory seems to have placed toys in out boxes instead of the usual....."

 

Exactly...

 

OK, like I said before, the odds of it happening are amazingly small, but it's not impossible.

 

Imagine if you will a very excited FTF yelling Yippie!!! and then by who knows what series of events, they catch a round from somewhere. The second person to find the cache gets the worst second to find prize ever. In come the investigators. Our bad luck participant caught one of the popular size rounds from both the military and civilian world, like say 9mm or .223, but as luck would have it, it was the same size round as the ammo can laying at his feet. Now, we dont know where that round came from, and neither do the investigators, so we can not rule out difinitively that it was not the last remaining round in that can, and that it was somehow set off without the assistance of a weapon, and that our vic actually 'shot himself' with a defective round (cause they shouldnt just go off like that). So now the investigation gets kicked up a notch, and every remaining can of that ammo lot world wide is put into emergency suspense until the whole thing gets figured out. Even if that only takes a day instead of a week, there might be some unit somewhere that has it, and is unable to use it because they dont know yet if the rounds are defective, and might just go off for no reason. So, all the rounds from that lot have to be called back to the armory and rotated out for rounds from another lot. It cant wait for normal shift change, which means there is now a mad scramble to rotate all the watches to the armory to download, and the added stress of not knowing if the rounds in thier hands might just go off for no reason. Now we sink thousands of dollars and wasted man hours into testing and recertifying the ammo, and until that happens, those rounds are isolated and unusable. Once it finally does get resolved, everyone gets this awesome story about how it all could have been avoided if some darn geocacher would have just destroyed the lot number like they are suppossed to... well, most of it could have been avoided, we still have a dead guy and that whole investigation, but at least now they know it didnt come from the can.

 

Improbable? amazingly. Impossible? no. all of those events are possible, and have happened individually. Totally within our simple powers to keep them from happening all together for no reason.

Edited by root1657
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Hiya,

 

Just tried using nail polish... worked, but it killed the finish.. I took a pic...not sure how to upload. Anyway... You can tell the marking were removed and you can see most of the markings faintly if you turn it in the light. Think this is good enough?

 

Yeah, that should do. It doesnt have to be completelyunreadable, it just needs to be obvious that you intended to 'destroy' the number, which marks the can officially expended. Most of the time our armourers just give it a once over with black paint. It's just a quick drippy bad paint blast, but it gets the point across.

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When ammo from a can is expended the lot number should then be obliterated to indicate that the ammo from that can was fine, and to prevent any issue where the entire lot could be pulled from service without proper cause.

 

"Sarge, looks like we're gonna have to pull the ammo. The factory seems to have placed toys in out boxes instead of the usual....."

 

Exactly...

 

OK, like I said before, the odds of it happening are amazingly small, but it's not impossible.

 

Imagine if you will a very excited FTF yelling Yippie!!! and then by who knows what series of events, they catch a round from somewhere. The second person to find the cache gets the worst second to find prize ever. In come the investigators. Our bad luck participant caught one of the popular size rounds from both the military and civilian world, like say 9mm or .223, but as luck would have it, it was the same size round as the ammo can laying at his feet. Now, we dont know where that round came from, and neither do the investigators, so we can not rule out difinitively that it was not the last remaining round in that can, and that it was somehow set off without the assistance of a weapon, and that our vic actually 'shot himself' with a defective round (cause they shouldnt just go off like that). So now the investigation gets kicked up a notch, and every remaining can of that ammo lot world wide is put into emergency suspense until the whole thing gets figured out. Even if that only takes a day instead of a week, there might be some unit somewhere that has it, and is unable to use it because they dont know yet if the rounds are defective, and might just go off for no reason. So, all the rounds from that lot have to be called back to the armory and rotated out for rounds from another lot. It cant wait for normal shift change, which means there is now a mad scramble to rotate all the watches to the armory to download, and the added stress of not knowing if the rounds in thier hands might just go off for no reason. Now we sink thousands of dollars and wasted man hours into testing and recertifying the ammo, and until that happens, those rounds are isolated and unusable. Once it finally does get resolved, everyone gets this awesome story about how it all could have been avoided if some darn geocacher would have just destroyed the lot number like they are suppossed to... well, most of it could have been avoided, we still have a dead guy and that whole investigation, but at least now they know it didnt come from the can.

 

Improbable? amazingly. Impossible? no. all of those events are possible, and have happened individually. Totally within our simple powers to keep them from happening all together for no reason.

Improbable? yes. To the extant that I don't believe that any investigator would assume that the round spontaniously flew out of the box. Also, a simple review of the scene would show that this did not happen. Therefore: Impossible: YES.
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Hiya,

 

Just tried using nail polish... worked, but it killed the finish.. I took a pic...not sure how to upload. Anyway... You can tell the marking were removed and you can see most of the markings faintly if you turn it in the light. Think this is good enough?

 

Yeah, that should do. It doesnt have to be completelyunreadable, it just needs to be obvious that you intended to 'destroy' the number, which marks the can officially expended. Most of the time our armourers just give it a once over with black paint. It's just a quick drippy bad paint blast, but it gets the point across.

Initially, I just gave my cans a quick wipe with 'goof off'. It worked well. Eventually, I started camo painting them so the issue became moot.

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Hiya,

 

Just tried using nail polish... worked, but it killed the finish.. I took a pic...not sure how to upload. Anyway... You can tell the marking were removed and you can see most of the markings faintly if you turn it in the light. Think this is good enough?

 

Yeah, that should do. It doesnt have to be completelyunreadable, it just needs to be obvious that you intended to 'destroy' the number, which marks the can officially expended. Most of the time our armourers just give it a once over with black paint. It's just a quick drippy bad paint blast, but it gets the point across.

 

K, thanks man.

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When ammo from a can is expended the lot number should then be obliterated to indicate that the ammo from that can was fine, and to prevent any issue where the entire lot could be pulled from service without proper cause.

 

"Sarge, looks like we're gonna have to pull the ammo. The factory seems to have placed toys in out boxes instead of the usual....."

 

Exactly...

 

OK, like I said before, the odds of it happening are amazingly small, but it's not impossible.

 

Imagine if you will a very excited FTF yelling Yippie!!! and then by who knows what series of events, they catch a round from somewhere. The second person to find the cache gets the worst second to find prize ever. In come the investigators. Our bad luck participant caught one of the popular size rounds from both the military and civilian world, like say 9mm or .223, but as luck would have it, it was the same size round as the ammo can laying at his feet. Now, we dont know where that round came from, and neither do the investigators, so we can not rule out difinitively that it was not the last remaining round in that can, and that it was somehow set off without the assistance of a weapon, and that our vic actually 'shot himself' with a defective round (cause they shouldnt just go off like that). So now the investigation gets kicked up a notch, and every remaining can of that ammo lot world wide is put into emergency suspense until the whole thing gets figured out. Even if that only takes a day instead of a week, there might be some unit somewhere that has it, and is unable to use it because they dont know yet if the rounds are defective, and might just go off for no reason. So, all the rounds from that lot have to be called back to the armory and rotated out for rounds from another lot. It cant wait for normal shift change, which means there is now a mad scramble to rotate all the watches to the armory to download, and the added stress of not knowing if the rounds in thier hands might just go off for no reason. Now we sink thousands of dollars and wasted man hours into testing and recertifying the ammo, and until that happens, those rounds are isolated and unusable. Once it finally does get resolved, everyone gets this awesome story about how it all could have been avoided if some darn geocacher would have just destroyed the lot number like they are suppossed to... well, most of it could have been avoided, we still have a dead guy and that whole investigation, but at least now they know it didnt come from the can.

 

Improbable? amazingly. Impossible? no. all of those events are possible, and have happened individually. Totally within our simple powers to keep them from happening all together for no reason.

Improbable? yes. To the extant that I don't believe that any investigator would assume that the round spontaniously flew out of the box. Also, a simple review of the scene would show that this did not happen. Therefore: Impossible: YES.

I agree. Unless there is an expended case lying in or next to the can, and a wound track that might indicate such a freak accident, no one will assume it was ammo from the can. Bdsices most force from the round self exploding would be spent ripping the case apart, not propelling the bullet with any great force.

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Improbable? yes. To the extant that I don't believe that any investigator would assume that the round spontaniously flew out of the box. Also, a simple review of the scene would show that this did not happen. Therefore: Impossible: YES.

I agree. Unless there is an expended case lying in or next to the can, and a wound track that might indicate such a freak accident, no one will assume it was ammo from the can. Bdsices most force from the round self exploding would be spent ripping the case apart, not propelling the bullet with any great force.

 

You guys can split hairs on this all day, but it's beyond the point of mattering. Would it be sorted out in the investigation as you say, yes. Can a round have lethal force without the support of a gun barrel? yes. Case in point, mythbusters did an extensive experiment with .22 rimfire carts being set off by non-weapon means, and having enough force to penetrate the crash test subject that was in the way. even that tiny round could explode with still lethal projected force.

 

I was just putting it out there so people know. I've done that. Thanks for the feedback.

 

root1657

Military Accociation Of Geocachers

MESF

Security Forces Watch Commander

US Navy Marksmanship Team

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Improbable? yes. To the extant that I don't believe that any investigator would assume that the round spontaniously flew out of the box. Also, a simple review of the scene would show that this did not happen. Therefore: Impossible: YES.

I agree. Unless there is an expended case lying in or next to the can, and a wound track that might indicate such a freak accident, no one will assume it was ammo from the can. Bdsices most force from the round self exploding would be spent ripping the case apart, not propelling the bullet with any great force.

 

You guys can split hairs on this all day, but it's beyond the point of mattering. Would it be sorted out in the investigation as you say, yes. Can a round have lethal force without the support of a gun barrel? yes. Case in point, mythbusters did an extensive experiment with .22 rimfire carts being set off by non-weapon means, and having enough force to penetrate the crash test subject that was in the way. even that tiny round could explode with still lethal projected force.

 

I was just putting it out there so people know. I've done that. Thanks for the feedback.

 

root1657

Military Accociation Of Geocachers

MESF

Security Forces Watch Commander

US Navy Marksmanship Team

Please don't get upset just because others didn't buy into your hypothetical scenario.
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I use MEK (methyl ethyl ketone) to remove the yellow markings. Takes it completely off in about 10 seconds and does not affect the olive drab paint underneath.

MEK is one of the few solvents that will cross the skin barrier. That means that if you disolve anything in MEK (the paint for instance) and are using it with bare skin; the MEK will be absorbed into the bloodstream and bring along some of the paint with it. (think nicotine patch).

 

As solvents go, it is very good - eats away almost anything. But be sure to wear protecive gloves, etc. when using MEK.

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I use MEK (methyl ethyl ketone) to remove the yellow markings. Takes it completely off in about 10 seconds and does not affect the olive drab paint underneath.

MEK is one of the few solvents that will cross the skin barrier. That means that if you disolve anything in MEK (the paint for instance) and are using it with bare skin; the MEK will be absorbed into the bloodstream and bring along some of the paint with it. (think nicotine patch).

 

As solvents go, it is very good - eats away almost anything. But be sure to wear protecive gloves, etc. when using MEK.

I'm told that it's also a strong (severe? bad?) carcinogen. Use with care.

Edited by sbell111
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Yup, good advice to be careful with MEK (or *any* [non-water] solvent for that matter)

 

When I suggested it, I considered giving the standard gloves/ventilation warnings, but I figured anybody that has access to it is well aware of the handling precautions.

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Please don't get upset just because others didn't buy into your hypothetical scenario.

 

Upset? no.

 

Disappointed with your compulsive need to discount the very notion of something that I said in my origional post was "astronomically improbable", you bet.

 

Back to the point of what I was even talking about before you had to just crap on it, if there is even one single chance of if happening in the entirety of the universe, then why not just remove the number to prevent it and help protect the reputation of the sport? cept to be a contrarian.

 

This is the part where you throw in some new dismissive comment about how it's all on me for being 'whatever'.

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Imagine if you will a very excited FTF yelling Yippie!!! and then by who knows what series of events, they catch a round from somewhere.

 

all of those events are possible, and have happened individually.

 

Could you please cite an example of a FTF cacher (or any cacher, for that matter) while caching, catching 'a round from somewhere'?

 

If caching is more dangerous that I thougt, I'd like to know about it.

 

Just to be clear, I fully support removal of the military markings from ammo cans. I've seen a few in the field with the markings still on them and it always makes me cringe.

Edited by Stargazer22
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Please don't get upset just because others didn't buy into your hypothetical scenario.
Upset? no.

 

Disappointed with your compulsive need to discount the very notion of something that I said in my origional post was "astronomically improbable", you bet.

So, even though you said that something was 'astronomically improbable', you are disappointed that others believe the same thing to be impossible? I'm sorry, but these forums exist to discuss issues.
Back to the point of what I was even talking about before you had to just crap on it, if there is even one single chance of if happening in the entirety of the universe, then why not just remove the number to prevent it and help protect the reputation of the sport? cept to be a contrarian.
Except if you follow that logic, we should not hide any geocaches. BTW, it's not the removal of the verbiage that I diasagree with. It's the idea that leaving the verbiage on may somehow cause great inconvenience for the military and that, somehow, leaving the verbiage on could cause the military that inconvenience because someone might possible believe that a live round was somehow left in the ammo can while it was owned by the military and remained in the can up to and continuing into the time that it was placed in the woods as a geocache somehow spontaniously fired at the moment that a geocacher logged his/her find and killed the geocacher.

 

I think that it's more likely that a meteor would crash at the site of a geocache and that the local populous would accuse geocachers of using their strange magic to draw the meteor to the geocache.

This is the part where you throw in some new dismissive comment about how it's all on me for being 'whatever'.
It's all on you for being 'whatever'. Edited by sbell111
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Back to the point of what I was even talking about before you had to just crap on it, if there is even one single chance of if happening in the entirety of the universe, then why not just remove the number to prevent it and help protect the reputation of the sport? cept to be a contrarian.

 

At no point in the thread has anyone suggested that removing all the military markings from an ammo can is not a first-class idea, to protect the reputation of the sport and for other reasons.

 

However, there are an awful lot of things which are more likely than "one single chance of it happening in the entirety of the universe" and yet which we don't worry about. "Getting shot while jumping in the air after finding a cache" is already, by definition, more likely than "Getting shot while jumping in the air after finding a cache AND the investigators thought the round might have come from the can". And I think most of the people here have decided to take the risk of getting shot when out caching (although maybe you have some dangerous locations you'd like to share with us).

 

I also note that the topic title you selected was not "Another relevant reason to remove ammo can markings". It was "Most important reason to remove ammo can markings!". To make a claim like that, you need to back it up with something a little better than "one single chance of it happening in the entirety of the universe".

 

I'm sure we all appreciate your sharing the information about the protocols for testing batches of ammo, but that's really all it is - background information about the original usage of our favourite cache container.

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If this is something that the military would be legitimately concerned with then one would expect that the military would remove markings from ammo boxes before selling them off to civilian retail outlets. Since the military is apparently not that concerned about removing markings, then I'm not concerned.

 

You can put me into the "whatever" classification if you want. :unsure:

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As solvents go, it is very good - eats away almost anything. But be sure to wear protecive gloves, etc. when using MEK.

I'm assuming that it doesn't eat gloves?

I believe that it will eat through latex gloves in a blink and it will pass right through nitrile gloves.

Edited by sbell111
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As solvents go, it is very good - eats away almost anything. But be sure to wear protecive gloves, etc. when using MEK.

I'm assuming that it doesn't eat gloves?

I believe that it will eat through latex gloves in a blink and it will pass right through nitrile gloves.

What gloves would you recommend?

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If this is something that the military would be legitimately concerned with then one would expect that the military would remove markings from ammo boxes before selling them off to civilian retail outlets. Since the military is apparently not that concerned about removing markings, then I'm not concerned.

 

You can put me into the "whatever" classification if you want. :unsure:

 

Good point! :huh:

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If this is something that the military would be legitimately concerned with then one would expect that the military would remove markings from ammo boxes before selling them off to civilian retail outlets. Since the military is apparently not that concerned about removing markings, then I'm not concerned.

 

You can put me into the "whatever" classification if you want. :unsure:

 

Surplus ammo, sold in bulk, still in cans, still has it's marking. What happens after that is on who ever is doing it. That was why I said it was so surprising how many make it out with marks intact, given the way we run the ranges.

Edited by root1657
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Dang! My ammo cans are at least a mile into the watershed, off seldom used trails. It's going to be a pain to go out to remove the markings! One of them hasn't been found in over a year! Oh, well. I must do my civic duty...

You'll have to go out and verify that the army didn't leave any bullets in it anyhow. You may as well put a sticker or some tape over the writing at the same time.

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As solvents go, it is very good - eats away almost anything. But be sure to wear protecive gloves, etc. when using MEK.

I'm assuming that it doesn't eat gloves?

I believe that it will eat through latex gloves in a blink and it will pass right through nitrile gloves.

What gloves would you recommend?

 

From the M.E.K. MSDS sheet!

 

8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection

 

Airborne Exposure Limits:

-OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL):

200 ppm (TWA)

 

-ACGIH Threshold Limit Value (TLV):

200 ppm (TWA), 300 ppm (STEL)

Ventilation System:

A system of local and/or general exhaust is recommended to keep employee exposures below the Airborne Exposure Limits. Local exhaust ventilation is generally preferred because it can control the emissions of the contaminant at its source, preventing dispersion of it into the general work area. Please refer to the ACGIH document, Industrial Ventilation, A Manual of Recommended Practices, most recent edition, for details. Use explosion-proof equipment.

Personal Respirators (NIOSH Approved):

If the exposure limit is exceeded and engineering controls are not feasible, a full facepiece respirator with organic vapor cartridge may be worn up to 50 times the exposure limit or the maximum use concentration specified by the appropriate regulatory agency or respirator supplier, whichever is lowest. For emergencies or instances where the exposure levels are not known, use a full-facepiece positive-pressure, air-supplied respirator. WARNING: Air purifying respirators do not protect workers in oxygen-deficient atmospheres.

Skin Protection:

Wear impervious protective clothing, including boots, gloves, lab coat, apron or coveralls, as appropriate, to prevent skin contact. Butyl rubber is a suitable material for personal protective equipment.

Eye Protection:

Use chemical safety goggles and/or a full face shield where splashing is possible. Maintain eye wash fountain and quick-drench facilities in work area.

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When ammo from a can is expended the lot number should then be obliterated to indicate that the ammo from that can was fine, and to prevent any issue where the entire lot could be pulled from service without proper cause.

 

"Sarge, looks like we're gonna have to pull the ammo. The factory seems to have placed toys in out boxes instead of the usual....."

 

Exactly...

Yes, yes, yes.... thank you, PhxChem, for enunciating so clearly and eloquently the terrible fear that has seized me since I first found this thread. In fact, I have been unable to fall asleep for several nights now, so obsessed is my mind with the terrifying vision of a harried battlefield commander opening an ammo can in the heat of battle, only to find within a ziplock baggie containing a leaky pen and a damp logbook, and some broken Mctoys, a leaky wet and corroded AA alkaline cell, and the moldy remnants of a half-eaten cracker, and thus triggering the issuance of a worldwide recall order for all ammo cans from that same batch. Horrors! In fact, so unsettled am I feeling that I must forthwith waddle over to my Revigator radioactive water dispenser, and sip a large mug of radioactive water in order to soothe my nerves.

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Out of curiosity, where is the lot number located?

 

I only have one handy, but all of the ammo cans I get from our surplus store have their markings, although they are largely Vietnam war era. The one I happen to have handy says this:

 

100 CTRG .50 CAL

LINK M9

1API MK211 - 1AP MK263

1API MK211 - AAP MK263

1API DIM TRACER MK 257

LC-06J625L019

 

My guess would be the last line, right?

 

I'd cover all of them.

So if you grind off "Colt" from the weapon,or grind off "Face toward Enemy" from the claymore mine, it will be seen as less threatening by some who may stumble upon it.Think anybody would pick up a stick of dynamite to read the label or just assume that it what it looks like. I would think that most folks could identify U.S. military ammo boxes without any trouble. The fact that labels are removed won't make them less threatening.........most civilians can't interpret the military lingo anyway. It just an ammo box, call the cops!The cops show up if a threat is perceived,.....the bomb squad blows it up whether it has a label or not.In some rare instances, geocachers have helped LEO's indentify cache containers found by accident, but you want to chance it?Eliminate the chance of legal action against you, rare though it be, just say No to military containers. There are too many other options that are cheaper anyway. Cheapest I see, is $5-$20 a piece at most surplus stores or flea markets.What if you get pulled over by LEO's on the way home from the surplus store, and they spot a dozen ammo boxes in the back seat, you will be "detained".

Edited by snowfrog
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Out of curiosity, where is the lot number located?

 

I only have one handy, but all of the ammo cans I get from our surplus store have their markings, although they are largely Vietnam war era. The one I happen to have handy says this:

 

100 CTRG .50 CAL

LINK M9

1API MK211 - 1AP MK263

1API MK211 - AAP MK263

1API DIM TRACER MK 257

LC-06J625L019

 

My guess would be the last line, right?

 

I'd cover all of them.

So if you grind off "Colt" from the weapon,or grind off "Face toward Enemy" from the claymore mine, it will be seen as less threatening by some who may stumble upon it.Think anybody would pick up a stick of dynamite to read the label or just assume that it what it looks like. I would think that most folks could identify U.S. military ammo boxes without any trouble. The fact that labels are removed won't make them less threatening.........most civilians can't interpret the military lingo anyway. It just an ammo box, call the cops!The cops show up if a threat is perceived,.....the bomb squad blows it up whether it has a label or not.In some rare instances, geocachers have helped LEO's indentify cache containers found by accident, but you want to chance it?Eliminate the chance of legal action against you, rare though it be, just say No to military containers. There are too many other options that are cheaper anyway. Cheapest I see, is $5-$20 a piece at most surplus stores or flea markets.What if you get pulled over by LEO's on the way home from the surplus store, and they spot a dozen ammo boxes in the back seat, you will be "detained".

Why does Vinny's post say 'snowfrog'?
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Out of curiosity, where is the lot number located?

 

I only have one handy, but all of the ammo cans I get from our surplus store have their markings, although they are largely Vietnam war era. The one I happen to have handy says this:

 

100 CTRG .50 CAL

LINK M9

1API MK211 - 1AP MK263

1API MK211 - AAP MK263

1API DIM TRACER MK 257

LC-06J625L019

 

My guess would be the last line, right?

Huh?

 

I'd cover all of them.

So if you grind off "Colt" from the weapon,or grind off "Face toward Enemy" from the claymore mine, it will be seen as less threatening by some who may stumble upon it.Think anybody would pick up a stick of dynamite to read the label or just assume that it what it looks like. I would think that most folks could identify U.S. military ammo boxes without any trouble. The fact that labels are removed won't make them less threatening.........most civilians can't interpret the military lingo anyway. It just an ammo box, call the cops!The cops show up if a threat is perceived,.....the bomb squad blows it up whether it has a label or not.In some rare instances, geocachers have helped LEO's indentify cache containers found by accident, but you want to chance it?Eliminate the chance of legal action against you, rare though it be, just say No to military containers. There are too many other options that are cheaper anyway. Cheapest I see, is $5-$20 a piece at most surplus stores or flea markets.What if you get pulled over by LEO's on the way home from the surplus store, and they spot a dozen ammo boxes in the back seat, you will be "detained".

Why does Vinny's post say 'snowfrog'?

Edited by snowfrog
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Out of curiosity, where is the lot number located?

 

I only have one handy, but all of the ammo cans I get from our surplus store have their markings, although they are largely Vietnam war era. The one I happen to have handy says this:

 

100 CTRG .50 CAL

LINK M9

1API MK211 - 1AP MK263

1API MK211 - AAP MK263

1API DIM TRACER MK 257

LC-06J625L019

 

My guess would be the last line, right?

 

I'd cover all of them.

So if you grind off "Colt" from the weapon,or grind off "Face toward Enemy" from the claymore mine, it will be seen as less threatening by some who may stumble upon it.Think anybody would pick up a stick of dynamite to read the label or just assume that it what it looks like. I would think that most folks could identify U.S. military ammo boxes without any trouble. The fact that labels are removed won't make them less threatening.........most civilians can't interpret the military lingo anyway. It just an ammo box, call the cops!The cops show up if a threat is perceived,.....the bomb squad blows it up whether it has a label or not.In some rare instances, geocachers have helped LEO's indentify cache containers found by accident, but you want to chance it?Eliminate the chance of legal action against you, rare though it be, just say No to military containers. There are too many other options that are cheaper anyway. Cheapest I see, is $5-$20 a piece at most surplus stores or flea markets.What if you get pulled over by LEO's on the way home from the surplus store, and they spot a dozen ammo boxes in the back seat, you will be "detained".

 

I think it all goes to WHERE and HOW you hide these ammo cans. If they are out in the middle of the woods, nobody will give them a second thought. But if they are next to a built up area or possible 'target' location it may be viewed a bit differently. I have no issue with military ammo cans used in the way they are, heck the first ammo can I seen was full of rusty tools :laughing:

Yes, it is reccomended that the markings be taken off, but more importantly I think that Geocaching markings be added. And as to ammo being recalled because of an incident off post, I think it is highly unlikely. It takes a few incidents at a range or other location before a whole lot is suspended for use, and that is only after it has been determined that it is the ammo and not the weapon that is at fault.

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Out of curiosity, where is the lot number located?

 

I only have one handy, but all of the ammo cans I get from our surplus store have their markings, although they are largely Vietnam war era. The one I happen to have handy says this:

 

100 CTRG .50 CAL

LINK M9

1API MK211 - 1AP MK263

1API MK211 - AAP MK263

1API DIM TRACER MK 257

LC-06J625L019

 

My guess would be the last line, right?

 

I'd cover all of them.

So if you grind off "Colt" from the weapon,or grind off "Face toward Enemy" from the claymore mine, it will be seen as less threatening by some who may stumble upon it.Think anybody would pick up a stick of dynamite to read the label or just assume that it what it looks like. I would think that most folks could identify U.S. military ammo boxes without any trouble. The fact that labels are removed won't make them less threatening.........most civilians can't interpret the military lingo anyway. It just an ammo box, call the cops!The cops show up if a threat is perceived,.....the bomb squad blows it up whether it has a label or not.In some rare instances, geocachers have helped LEO's indentify cache containers found by accident, but you want to chance it?Eliminate the chance of legal action against you, rare though it be, just say No to military containers. There are too many other options that are cheaper anyway. Cheapest I see, is $5-$20 a piece at most surplus stores or flea markets.What if you get pulled over by LEO's on the way home from the surplus store, and they spot a dozen ammo boxes in the back seat, you will be "detained".

 

I think it all goes to WHERE and HOW you hide these ammo cans. If they are out in the middle of the woods, nobody will give them a second thought. But if they are next to a built up area or possible 'target' location it may be viewed a bit differently. I have no issue with military ammo cans used in the way they are, heck the first ammo can I seen was full of rusty tools :laughing:

Yes, it is reccomended that the markings be taken off, but more importantly I think that Geocaching markings be added. And as to ammo being recalled because of an incident off post, I think it is highly unlikely. It takes a few incidents at a range or other location before a whole lot is suspended for use, and that is only after it has been determined that it is the ammo and not the weapon that is at fault.

In the woods probablyyyy not. Doesn't have to be near a target though to get unwanted attention. For the same reason we shouldn't put caches near schools or playgrounds is because the container and/or activity involved in searching, is suspect, and you as a seeker are a perceived threat. So we avoid it, right... because they're are plenty of other places to hide them!

Edited by snowfrog
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Out of curiosity, where is the lot number located?

 

I only have one handy, but all of the ammo cans I get from our surplus store have their markings, although they are largely Vietnam war era. The one I happen to have handy says this:

 

100 CTRG .50 CAL

LINK M9

1API MK211 - 1AP MK263

1API MK211 - AAP MK263

1API DIM TRACER MK 257

LC-06J625L019

 

My guess would be the last line, right?

 

I'd cover all of them.

So if you grind off "Colt" from the weapon, or grind off "Face toward Enemy" from the claymore mine, it will be seen as less threatening by some who may stumble upon it. Think anybody would pick up a stick of dynamite to read the label or just assume that it what it looks like. I would think that most folks could identify U.S. military ammo boxes without any trouble. The fact that labels are removed won't make them less threatening.........most civilians can't interpret the military lingo anyway. It just an ammo box, call the cops!The cops show up if a threat is perceived,.....the bomb squad blows it up whether it has a label or not.In some rare instances, geocachers have helped LEO's indentify cache containers found by accident, but you want to chance it?Eliminate the chance of legal action against you, rare though it be, just say No to military containers. There are too many other options that are cheaper anyway. Cheapest I see, is $5-$20 a piece at most surplus stores or flea markets. What if you get pulled over by LEO's on the way home from the surplus store, and they spot a dozen ammo boxes in the back seat, you will be "detained".

Why does Vinny's post say 'snowfrog'?

Sharp of you to catch that...! The answer is that it is simply because 72% of all the accounts which post on these forums are my sock puppets, and sometimes I forget to switch accounts before sending a post... In fact, if you think that Snowfrog, Snoogans, KBI and Mushtang are real people and not my sock puppets, well... you may need to recalibrate your reality radar...!

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Another reason to remove the markings AND mark it as a Geocache is the Bomb Squad. I work on a Squad and three of us geocache. This means that the rest of the squad members know about caching. This is not to say that if called out to a suspicious package with the "geocache" markings we would use less caution but it would be a factor in the action plan to handle it. I wonder how many caches are destroyed by bomb squads.

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Another reason to remove the markings AND mark it as a Geocache is the Bomb Squad. I work on a Squad and three of us geocache. This means that the rest of the squad members know about caching. This is not to say that if called out to a suspicious package with the "geocache" markings we would use less caution but it would be a factor in the action plan to handle it. I wonder how many caches are destroyed by bomb squads.

Do a search of the forums and you will find many threads about caches thought to be bombs - some destroyed, some not. There's a bookmark list around that lists most of the known ones.

 

Edit to add linky to bookmark list: click here.

Edited by The Jester
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