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Why Log A Dnf . . .


GRANPA ALEX
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I have seen logs from experienced cachers saying that the cache must have been muggled and then someone else comes right behind them and find it. I like to see all the logs the good the bad and the dNF's I have looked for 2 caches that between them i have at least 5 or 6 DNF's and one of them is rated 1.5/1.5 many people have found it even on the same day i was there one is a puzzle that at first i couldnt find and now i cannt open i log them all or try to. there are too many variables to figure that if you the experienced cacher couldnt find it it must be gone. unless we get them to make a new category that is "Looked but it must not be there" :anitongue:

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Yesterday, with a foot of snow on the ground, I found a cache that I had looked for this past summer and was certain it was not there. Now with a little more experience, it was a much easier find. I had not even considered the hiding spot the first time [it was a little devious].

 

I looked back through the logs because I wanted to see what I had written about the first hunt. I had failed to log the DNF.

 

In addition to the reasons above, reading an old DNF is entertaining when you do finally find it.

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But, but, but.. by logging a DNF just because they can't find it means they are a failure and then other kids will laugh and make fun of them and they'll feel bad and and and. One person said they didn't log DNF because they didn't want to look stupid. Makes my point.

It's not about looking stupid. You really have to be an insecure person to worry about what a bunch of anonymous people, or anyone, thinks about you not being able to find a bunch of Mctoys hidden somewhere.

DNFs tell the next cacher that the cache is may take a bit more effort than what a rating indicates. Just because a person can't find it doesn't mean it's not there. It's also a history of the cache. As someone else posted he wasn't even aware a stage of his cache was missing because no one had posted anything. Had the seekers not worried about "looking stupid" the cache owner would have known sooner there was a problem. But no, don't want to look stupid.

I log my DNFs. It's part of our hunt and gives us a record of our travels. Just don't make fun of me or I'll tell mommy. :anitongue:

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I made a weak attempt on it but in many cases it's more of a "didn't find" than a "couldn't find". I'd have a better idea of when to log a note and when to log a DNF if this little discrepency was cleared up.

 

When I go to log the result of my cache hunt the pull down menu gives me several choices. "Couldn't find", "I'm Certain the Cache is Missing" and "I Only Looked for 10 Minutes" aren't on my pull down menu. If TBPB decide to add those options, then I'd use them. Until they do, my options are "Found It", Didn't Find It" and "Needs Archive" and I choose the appropriate one.

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I made a weak attempt on it but in many cases it's more of a "didn't find" than a "couldn't find". I'd have a better idea of when to log a note and when to log a DNF if this little discrepency was cleared up.

 

When I go to log the result of my cache hunt the pull down menu gives me several choices. "Couldn't find", "I'm Certain the Cache is Missing" and "I Only Looked for 10 Minutes" aren't on my pull down menu. If TBPB decide to add those options, then I'd use them. Until they do, my options are "Found It", Didn't Find It" and "Needs Archive" and I choose the appropriate one.

Yes. But why does my "didn't find it" become a "couldn't find it" when the notification emails go out? For some dumb reason, this bugs me.

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Yes. But why does my "didn't find it" become a "couldn't find it" when the notification emails go out? For some dumb reason, this bugs me.

In the olden days, the dropdown list of logs was worded as "Couldn't Find It." Sometime when the page was worked over, Jeremy updated the wording, but didn't change the email apparently.

 

In this thread, Jeremy says it's silly.

 

Jamie

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Not logging a DNF is the same as giving a trophy to the losers of a baseball tournament. It is too bad that in todays society we feel that everyone has to be a winner every time or log a found on every cache.

 

I get out of the van to start looking for a cache and don't sign the log is a dnf with very few exceptions. (I can only think of two, one of which the log was frozen solid in a block of ice.)

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My point was that if I believe it is TRULY a DNF, I will so log . . . if not, I will not, as it may well be MY problem and not the cache hide.

A DNF is TRULY a DNF if you made an attempt to find a cache and Did Not Find the cache.

 

Seems pretty simple. Facts is facts.

 

If you visited twice and did not find the cache twice, that's two DNFs. Been there, done that. Will continue to do that in the future.

 

Until I get the hang of this game, I expect I'll have a lot of DNFs to log. :anitongue:

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Doesnt matter whether the cache is missing or not, or if you stumped your toe on the way to the cache and had to break off your search, or your baby sitter called and you had to leave before finding, or muggles were at the cache site and you couldnt risk searching right then, or it got dark and you didnt have a flashlight, or, etc,, etc,,,,,,,

 

DNF = Did Not Find

 

There is no shame in admitting that you "did not find" the cache! :anitongue:

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As a cache owner, it drives me nuts when cachers don't log DNF's.

 

DNF's tells me that the cache might be missing. Generally if I see two DNF's in a row, I go check on the cache. So logging a DNF is simply being considerate of future cachers.

 

OR

 

If you are worried about your ego, send me an email saying that you couldn't find it and don't log your DNF so less people know that you couldn't find it (as if anybody cares)

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Why Log A Dnf . . ., What does it mean?

 

Put in its most simple terms, it means Did Not Find. You went out and searched. You either found it... or not.

 

A series of DNFs put together may indicate a problem with the cache, or the cache is pretty hard to find. It was not originally meant to act as a signal there is a problem although that's a nice side effect for the cache owner.

 

Some people log it and some don't. Most of the folks that don't log it usually view it as a matter of shame rather than an experience to share.

 

Here's a couple of things to consider when posting a DNF:

  • Some of the best logs I have read were DNFs. Conversely, some of the worst were Finds.
  • Some of the best hints I picked up on when hunting a tough cache were from DNF logs. They tell me where not to look.

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if i don't really look, i don't log it.

 

like, if i get to the parking lot and don't feel like looking. or if i get to the location and for some reason think that the cache may or may not be there but that i just don't... (TS Edit: ...feel motivated to put an effort into the search.)

Its all been said before so this time I scanned for a post to quote. I slightly modified it for my m.o.

 

As for logging DNF's. I log all our dnf's where an effort was made to find it, even a lazy effort. I keep track of dnf's in two columns in an Excel spreadsheet of caching activity. One column for dnf but the cache was subsequently found and one for dnf and the cache appears to be missing. I'm at a different computer right now but I believe total dnf's are around 10% with dnf while cache still in place running around 6%.

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I almost never log a DNF unless I feel it will serve the owner notice that the cache may be compromised and I also want warn cachers who follow me of a potential muggle.

 

This results in a very RARE logging of DNF's for me.

 

Logging a DNF because I have not found it makes no sense . . . maybe I was not good at finding this type of hide or my puzzle solution was incorrect or whatever . . . I certainly do not want to send the owner out to repair a sound cache or ward off other cachers - that is not considerate of them.

 

Does this make sense?  :anitongue:

To me it does not make sense. When did DNF become Cache Is Missing? The FACT that a DNF is posted means absolutely nothing about whether the cache is there or not. The CONTENT of the DNF log may have some meaning, but a DNF is just an unseccessful hunt.

 

There is (at least) one cache where I was convinced that it was missing. I'd searched an area about 40' all around the co-ords - on two different trips - I'd even emailed the owner with more details of my search and then someone found it. I'm no newbie, but that cache is kicking my butt. So at what point do you say I should post a DNF? After the first try (knowing I'd be in the area the next week)? After the second one (even if I want to try again next time I'm in the area)? Never, because how can I be certain the cache is missing (I thought it was, but it wasn't)? And if I post one and someone then finds it, should I go back and erase my DNF? Heck, NO! I posted a DNF for each hunt - as I do for every unsuccessful hunt.

 

I'm almost afraid to ask: When would you post a SBA log? That's what your DNF logs sound like.

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Unless this...

Except for that...

 

Did you find it? No? Seems pretty easy to figure out how to log it.

Okay, first off... I'm still pretty green. So DNFs, in my case, could be the result of some REAL boneheaded mistake. Here's an example: there's a guy near me who hides a lot of micros in my neighborhood. Love 'em or hate 'em, these micros have been a HUGE help to my search skills, and he's been very encouraging as I learn the ropes. Anyhow, there's one cache... a 1/1, that took me four, count 'em, FOUR attempts to find. It was his usual M.O.--a film cannister velcroed behind a guard rail (at a stunning viewpoint I didn't know existed), but I couldn't find it to save my life. I was thinking about posting a DNF, but it had been recently found, so I didn't want to drag him out to check on it. He's one of those cachers who*really* keeps tabs on his stuff.

 

Long story short, it was--in my opinion--a good thing I didn't log those attempts. After #3, I figured out I've had the wrong coordinates in my GPS all this time--I don't know why I didn't check it. Argh! After correcting them, I was able to make the find in about five minutes, which includes the time it took me to walk the block and a half from my car. In this case, would it have made sense to log every DNF?

 

Cheers,

Leanne

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I don't want to log a "Did Not Find" frownie just because I "Did Not Find" it. Why, that little frownie face might hurt me or something. I know others can't look up my stats when it comes to frownies, but I can, and I don't want there to be ANY. I mean, it must mean I'm inadequate or something, right? I want to be SuperCacher, not ClarkKentCacher!

 

OK, Sarcasm over. I don't have any hard and fast rules, but generally if I make an effort to find it, but don't get to sign the logbook, FOR WHATEVER REASON, then I log a DNF. I do make an exception if I'm making MULTIPLE attempts on a difficult cache which I'm just to dumb or blind to see. After all, 4 DNF's in a row would discourage many folks from looking, when it's only little old me being dumb.

 

I do have one rule I almost never break though. If I log a DNF, I explain why. That way the owner will know if he needs to go out and look at it or not.

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We're pretty new to this but we've learned how important a DNF log is for a cache.

 

We've got a local cacher that has some really great hides and posting a DNF gets a fast response and usually a subtle hint as well via email. Most of these have resulted in increasing our skills and improving our finds at other caches. Most of these he has rated as 1.5 and for a new chacher they are more like 3 or 4 star difficulty, until AFTER you've found it. Then it all becomes clear and you can see the rating was acurate, but, not posting the DNF means you don't get the hint, you don't learn the twist, and you do not find other caches hidden the same way.

 

so, Did Not Find also means, "HEY ! you got me again! enlighten me to your wisdom OH MIGHTY cache owner". granted, not all owners give a clue as reward for posting your frownie, but, Most in our area do and I'm wiser because of it.

 

my 2 cents

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I do have one rule I almost never break though. If I log a DNF, I explain why. That way the owner will know if he needs to go out and look at it or not.

Exactly. Owners are saying they'll go check the cache after a couple DNF but really that's not so likely if they can tell that the seeker is kinda 'green' (like the previous poster mentioned), or that a seeker had to break off a search.

 

And even if the owner finds the cache in place it after DNF or two, they'll know that their cache will probably have more and won't be so overly sensitive about future reports. So log them DNFs!

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I tended to log most of my DNFs, but like many others, if I really didn't put the proper effort into the search, I didn't always log it.

To me a DNF log is a signal to the cache owner that the cache might be missing. It also discourages other cachers from looking. I know if I see a cache where the last couple of logs are DNFs I usually wait until I see a find or a note from the owner before looking for it.

 

Having said all of that, after reading these debates for the last couple of years, I do log all of my DNFs now. It's easy enough to explain how much or how little time I spent looking for the cache in the log.

 

Having said that, I still don't log a DNF if something like a flat tire, Sasquatch attack, or a nuclear holocaust prevents me from actually getting to the cache site to look around. Okay, maybe I'd still log a DNF after the Sasquatch attack, if I survived.

 

Edit: Spelling

Edited by Trinity's Crew
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Logging a DNF because I have not found it makes no sense . . .

Huh? :anitongue:

 

Isn't that what DNF means? "Did Not Find"? Am I missing something here? I know I'm dumber than a bag of hammers, but this one seems real simple, even to an ol' dunderhead such as I.

 

If I find it, I post a find, If I search and don't find it, I post a DNF. If I waive off the search I post a note.

 

How can this possibly be complicated?

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It seems like it physically hurts some of the posters to this thread that some people, myself included do not log DNFs the same way they do...I think that's much more interesting than the way that anybody logs DNFs :anitongue:

 

jamie

I just think its unfair to withhold information from the cache owner that will help him make an informed decision about the state and/or difficulty of his cache.

 

Also, in a sport in which shared experiences are a big part of its success, not doing so seems somewhat selfish.

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There is a cache in my area that is named "Going Crazy at the Cabin. I logged multiple DNF's on it. Over 50% of my DNF's on this cache were logged a day in advance. I knew I wouldn't find it so I was letting the owner know I was coming back. He may have wanted to come watch the fun :anitongue:

 

mr007s,,,,,Life is Good

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It seems like it physically hurts some of the posters to this thread that some people, myself included do not log DNFs the same way they do...

These threads always amuse me too. I usually don't bother to respond, not sure why I did tonight. As always, I play this game my way, others play it thier way. All I know is, I've got certain DNF's I absolutely rave about sometimes. See here and here.

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I think you're placing too much importance on the DNF log. The DNF is not a warning of any kind. It's just a statement that you looked and didn't find it.

 

Additionally, the proper log type is important for the whole system to work properly. The actual words in the log is not the only information folks look at. In different programs the log type is sometimes the only indicators folks have. Some folks also merely glance down the cache page scanning the little icons. They can do this because each on the icons are a different color.

 

A DNF doesn't mean you've exhaustedly searched the area and you are determined it is missing. It's nothing more than an indicator that, in your case, NFA made some sort of an attempt, but didn't complete that hunt. Nothing more, nothing less.

 

But if you don't do it, it throws the system a little bit off kilter.

 

Besides, how do you know the cache isn't supose to be so super easy that if you show you it's found? By not logging a DNF on a less than exhaustive search would actually be cheating the next person of that visual alert than something might be wrong.

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I just think its unfair to withhold information from the cache owner that will help him make an informed decision about the state and/or difficulty of his cache.

 

Also, in a sport in which shared experiences are a big part of its success, not doing so seems somewhat selfish.

Gotta go with BS on this. If you simply and honestly describe your DNF, how can it be the WRONG thing to do?

 

I once (or twice) searched long and hard trying for an FTF, only to find out that another experienced cacher tried and failed but didn't log his DNF. He emailed the owner instead, suggesting the coords might be wong. How rude!

 

-WR

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I just think its unfair to withhold information from the cache owner that will help him make an informed decision about the state and/or difficulty of his cache.

 

Also, in a sport in which shared experiences are a big part of its success, not doing so seems somewhat selfish.

Gotta go with BS on this. If you simply and honestly describe your DNF, how can it be the WRONG thing to do?

 

I once (or twice) searched long and hard trying for an FTF, only to find out that another experienced cacher tried and failed but didn't log his DNF. He emailed the owner instead, suggesting the coords might be wong. How rude!

 

-WR

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Logging a DNF because I have not found it makes no sense . . . maybe I was not good at finding this type of hide or my puzzle solution was incorrect or whatever . . . I certainly do not want to send the owner out to repair a sound cache or ward off other cachers - that is not considerate of them.

 

Does this make sense? :anitongue:

I think the original poster is simply confusing the purpose of DNF with that of SBA (should be archived).

 

As others have said, a DNF simply states you searched but haven`t found it. It might tell other searchers that the cache is not all that easy... several DNFs will probably send the owner checking the cache, but it depends how hard the cache is supposed to be and what you say in your logs.

 

Now, if you are really sure that the cache is gone (the area just got bulldozed, for example, or clear cut) what you want to use is not a DNF, it's a SBA.

 

The SBA is the one that sends a signal to the cache owner to go check on the cache, and fast.

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There's a cache that is kicking our butts and we've logged DNF's twice so far. We know the cache is there and we've found other cache's by this same hider and we know he is a mean evil person. But I look forward to looking for and finding his caches.

 

Someone even found the cache the same day we posted a DNF which really irks me especially since this find was only number 6 for them! We like to log DNF's usually because there is some story to go along with it. I just hope my DNF logs entertain the owner and the cachers who are thinking of looking for it. Each log is part of the cache history so I never erase them or cahnge them either.

 

If we look for a cache and had to call it quits before we searched completely we still log DNF, but tell why we had to quit searching. That way the owner will know they don't need to check on the cache. If there was another cacher in the area who didn't approach the site because someone was in the area then they know it was us not finding the cache.

 

There is once that we didn't bother logging. We were traveling and noticed a cache nearby. When we parked the car in the area we saw we still had almost a mile to hike to the cache. It was getting late and dark so we decided not to go look. We didn't even get out of the car, so we didn't bother to log anything.

Edited by Team Red Oak
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Hi,

 

Last post in this thread for me...

 

I'm a little bummed out that because I interpret "DNF" a little differently than some people do, cachers that I like and respect have said/suggested that I am selfish, dishonest, or messing up the system.

 

It's a game, I have fun geocaching, and log the way that I feel is appropriate. One of my most memorable caching experiences was a DNF I logged 2 summers ago in Utah...I just log them less than some other people do.

 

I think that there is room in geocaching for multiple interpretations of what "DNF" mean without messing up the system, so I hope that we can agree to disagree without further rankor.

later,

 

jamie

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Unless this...

Except for that...

 

Did you find it? No? Seems pretty easy to figure out how to log it.

Okay, first off... I'm still pretty green. So DNFs, in my case, could be the result of some REAL boneheaded mistake. Here's an example: there's a guy near me who hides a lot of micros in my neighborhood. Love 'em or hate 'em, these micros have been a HUGE help to my search skills, and he's been very encouraging as I learn the ropes. Anyhow, there's one cache... a 1/1, that took me four, count 'em, FOUR attempts to find. It was his usual M.O.--a film cannister velcroed behind a guard rail (at a stunning viewpoint I didn't know existed), but I couldn't find it to save my life. I was thinking about posting a DNF, but it had been recently found, so I didn't want to drag him out to check on it. He's one of those cachers who*really* keeps tabs on his stuff.

 

Long story short, it was--in my opinion--a good thing I didn't log those attempts. After #3, I figured out I've had the wrong coordinates in my GPS all this time--I don't know why I didn't check it. Argh! After correcting them, I was able to make the find in about five minutes, which includes the time it took me to walk the block and a half from my car. In this case, would it have made sense to log every DNF?

 

Cheers,

Leanne

Yep I would have logged everyone of them as a DNF and on the Found log I would have put what you wrote in here. Would give all others a bit of a chuckle and also give soem history and spice to this particular caceh.

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So my question is, when you're on a cache, before you make your mind if it's truly a DNF or if its your problem, did you really search well?  As for 200 finds in a weekend, whats your secret?

In response to your two (2) queries . . .

 

(1) I really search well for every cache & find most of them. There is rarely one that I walk away from without success. When I do, I check the text of recent successful finds by others to help me determine if it is MY fault that I am failing to find the cache . . . kinda like Briansat, if I know the others seekers, I can make a determination. Maybe unlike others, sometimes, I am not as focused and creative in my thinking as the hider was

 

(2) I had heard of but never been part of a 'cache machine' operation before and wanted to experience this part of the game . . . it WAS different & fun. We formed a team of four cachers. One operated a laptop as navigator (map program w/ caches overlaid on map), one acted as driver, one acted as cache description reader etc. We loaded all the (no long hikes) 1/1, 2/1, 2/2 caches in a geographic area (town) that intentionally was planned by the hiders for such a numbers-run action (ie: Ashville NC, Memphis TN, Jacksonville FL). Then we spent a very efficient and highly focused three day weekend, 6 AM to 1AM caching. I may never do this again, at least for a long time - but it was interesting & fun with the motivated & positive people in our group.

Edited by GRANPA ALEX
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Since this is my opinion, I also think that saying, "Logging a DNF just because I did not find it doesn't make sense--I don't know that it's not there" is the same thing as saying, "Logging a find because I found the cache right on the coordinates, just as described, doesn't make any sense. It was obviously there." I think that neither of these statements make sense.  If it's probably there and you didn't find it--DNF. If it's there and you find it-- Found. We all play our own game...but you did  ask.

Well said . . . I did ask! I like the way you put a thought together, kinda makes me want to revisit my OP ideas. THANKS!

Edited by GRANPA ALEX
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I'm almost afraid to ask:  When would you post a SBA log?  That's what your DNF logs sound like.

I can only recall ONE instance where I felt a SBA was appropriate on a cache in Chas. SC near a theatre that was obviously placed for commercial impact, poorly maintained and there was rotted meat all around the area - it was disgusting!

 

I was then very new to the game, unaware of SBA as an action - so I emailed the owner to get it maintained or removed (today, I would do an SBA).

 

As result, I have NEVER done an SBA - it would take lot for me to do so. It would have to be a cache that was known to be compromised, unhealthy or in very poor taste (like the rotted meat or another one that was in an area frequented by overt deviants).

Edited by GRANPA ALEX
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Geocaching without DNFs would be like watching a baseball game where every single pitch resulted in a home run. It would get boring real fast.

 

Geocaching is something more to us than signing our name on a log. It is the whole experience of the hunt. Some of our favorite caches have been ones that required repeat visits before we finally found it.

 

We always log our DNFs. It lets the cache owner know that their cache is challenging and enjoyable enough for repeat attempts. It lets geocachers who haven't found the cache know that they may be in for a challenge. It gives geocachers who have found the cache something to laugh about.

Edited by Sugar Glider Sweatshop
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I have a tough time deciding on logging a DNF, but it's not because of any childish shame or anything.

 

I logged a DNF on an easy "highway rest stop micro" with an obvious hint (that I ignored the first time). I actually noted that I thought it would be super quick and easy, but no dice. As I suspected, it appears someone else had the cache at the time, and when I went a few weeks later, I found it very quickly.

 

So I'm leery to log a DNF if I suspect the reason is that someone had the cache and that it is a case where if I go back again, I'll easily find it. I'll admit I only had one other case of this, but in that instance about a week later I did log it anyway when I looked at older logs for that cache and realized that a lot of "experienced" cachers actually did DNF it and then found it on a 2nd trip, so maybe it was me this time.

 

I also when logging a DNF note in it to the cache owner if I honestly think it is me vs. the cache itself. I figure with only 23 finds (about half of which are virtual/locationless) I'm not ready to insist it must be the cache.

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(2) I had heard of but never been part of a 'cache machine' operation before and wanted to experience this part of the game . . . it WAS different & fun. We formed a team of four cachers. One operated a laptop as navigator (map program w/ caches overlaid on map), one acted as driver, one acted as cache description reader etc. We loaded all the (no long hikes) 1/1, 2/1, 2/2 caches in a geographic area (town) that intentionally was planned by the hiders for such a numbers-run action (ie: Ashville NC, Memphis TN, Jacksonville FL). Then we spent a very efficient and highly focused three day weekend, 6 AM to 1AM caching. I may never do this again, at least for a long time - but it was interesting & fun with the motivated & positive people in our group.

Not to derail this interesting discussion of what and when is a DNF, but what you have described is a well run caching team, not a machine. A machine is made up of a convoy of cars with over a dozen cachers all looking for the same cache at the same time, and following the same route. One car/van load is not a machine IMO. :)

 

I now return you to your regular programming..... :)

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IMHO...

 

Looked for it, didn't find it and am probably not coming back to search for it again - then log it as DNF.

 

Someone took a poop in the cache - then log it as SBA.

 

Think cache is missing or have a problem/question - send a message to cache owner or post a note.

 

Looked for it, didn't find it, but will be back to look again - then post a note (or don't post anything).

 

Doesn't seem all that complicated to me.

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Unless this...

Except for that...

 

Did you find it? No? Seems pretty easy to figure out how to log it.

Okay, first off... I'm still pretty green. So DNFs, in my case, could be the result of some REAL boneheaded mistake. Here's an example: there's a guy near me who hides a lot of micros in my neighborhood. Love 'em or hate 'em, these micros have been a HUGE help to my search skills, and he's been very encouraging as I learn the ropes. Anyhow, there's one cache... a 1/1, that took me four, count 'em, FOUR attempts to find. It was his usual M.O.--a film cannister velcroed behind a guard rail (at a stunning viewpoint I didn't know existed), but I couldn't find it to save my life. I was thinking about posting a DNF, but it had been recently found, so I didn't want to drag him out to check on it. He's one of those cachers who*really* keeps tabs on his stuff.

 

Long story short, it was--in my opinion--a good thing I didn't log those attempts. After #3, I figured out I've had the wrong coordinates in my GPS all this time--I don't know why I didn't check it. Argh! After correcting them, I was able to make the find in about five minutes, which includes the time it took me to walk the block and a half from my car. In this case, would it have made sense to log every DNF?

 

Cheers,

Leanne

Yes! It would make sense to log the DNF's, after all, you didn't find the cache right?

 

You seem to be under the mistaken assumption that a DNF means the owner must go check on the cache. Why? just because one person that is inexperienced couldn't find it? The best solution is to log your DNF's. If the owner is concerned, maybe he'll send you an email asking where you looked. If several people can't find it, he may go look.

 

Even if you don't get "close" to the cache, a DNF can still be valuable information. Maybe you stopped at the trailhead because of a "trail closed" sign. Would your log include this information? You still didn't find the cache, but your log will tell why. The owner can read that and disable the cache until the trail reopens. it doesn't mean you "failed" in your search, only that you didn't find the cache. Many times there are extenuating circumstances. A DNF doesn't mean you're a bad cacher.

 

Usually the best stories come from when I didn't find one. I'm at the cache site (or on the trail) a lot longer than when I walk up and find it, so of course there's more to say.

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in light of new information gleaned from this thread, i have come to a very important decision. i am actually a fly fisherman first and foremost, and i have a long-standing history of great angst concerning those days on-stream when i have been skunked. from this day forth, i will no longer refer to this activity as "fishing" on those days in which i do not catch a fish. it will henceforth be known as "wading," unless i am skunked while fishing from a canoe or kayak, in which case it will be called "canoeing" or "kayaking," unless i am fishing from the bank, in which case it will be called "banking."

to alleviate any false logs at the onset of each trip, i will designate the activity "waving a stick in the air," until such time as i call a complete and total end to the event and assess whether or not any fish had actually come into my possession, my possession as defined by breaking the plane of the endzone...er, i mean a fish exiting the water with a hook fastened to any portion of its mouth. i feel quite relieved to have had all of this cleared up for me, i feel very foolish that i missed such a simple solution myself.

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<snip>

Having said that, I still don't log a DNF if something like a flat tire, Sasquatch attack, or a nuclear holocaust prevents me from actually getting to the cache site to look around. Okay, maybe I'd still log a DNF after the Sasquatch attack, if  I survived.

Why not? The rest of us want to read about your experience, successful or not.

As much as I hate to disagree with the saxman, I agree. :):)

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<snip>

Having said that, I still don't log a DNF if something like a flat tire, Sasquatch attack, or a nuclear holocaust prevents me from actually getting to the cache site to look around. Okay, maybe I'd still log a DNF after the Sasquatch attack, if  I survived.

Why not? The rest of us want to read about your experience, successful or not.

I also never consider it a DNF if something external prevents me from reaching ground zero. This would be a road washed out, alien abductions, stuff like that.

 

But, it sure as heck deserves a note so others can be made aware.

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<snip>

Having said that, I still don't log a DNF if something like a flat tire, Sasquatch attack, or a nuclear holocaust prevents me from actually getting to the cache site to look around. Okay, maybe I'd still log a DNF after the Sasquatch attack, if  I survived.

Why not? The rest of us want to read about your experience, successful or not.

Just my personal preference.

 

I have no problem with cachers who do log everything. Briansnat comes to mind. I think he logs a DNF if he reads the cache page and thinks about looking for it. :)

 

I'm just kidding, but I know that he does log a DNF if he makes it out the door in an attempt to find a cache. That's okay and I understand if he wants to do it this way, but I feel that I need to at least have looked for something before declaring that I didn't find it.

 

In the long run, who knows... I changed my mind about logging DNFs on caches that I didn't search for thoroughly. Given enough time I might change my mind about this.

 

Edit: spelling

Edited by Trinity's Crew
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<snip>

Having said that, I still don't log a DNF if something like a flat tire, Sasquatch attack, or a nuclear holocaust prevents me from actually getting to the cache site to look around. Okay, maybe I'd still log a DNF after the Sasquatch attack, if  I survived.

Why not? The rest of us want to read about your experience, successful or not.

I also never consider it a DNF if something external prevents me from reaching ground zero. This would be a road washed out, alien abductions, stuff like that.

 

But, it sure as heck deserves a note so others can be made aware.

Having a road washed out is a great reason to post a DNF! A note to the cache page won't alert me to it, but if I see a frownie face I'm much more likely to read the log, and it would be very important for me to know the road conditions before I drive all the way to Nevada and find out for myself that the road is out :)

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