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Painting/camouflaging Cache Boxes


mrking
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While some of the paint jobs seen in previous posts are nice, one of the main principles of camo has been neglected. In trying to camo something, breaking up the shape of the item can be more important than what color or pattern you paint on it. Just how many "straight lines" do you find in nature???

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Has anyone tried making the newer camo that the military is using? Like this..

 

digitalcamo_sm.jpg

 

Actually the new ACU pattern is the resurrection of the old Duo-Tex pattern that was used by the 2D ACR in the FRG during the early eighties. The pattern works well at a distance, but up close, the straight lines of the pixels are a dead giveaway that it's man-made. Therefore, I don't think it would work well for geocaching.

Edited by eagletrek
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While some of the paint jobs seen in previous posts are nice, one of the main principles of camo has been neglected. In trying to camo something, breaking up the shape of the item can be more important than what color or pattern you paint on it. Just how many "straight lines" do you find in nature???

I'm pretty pleased with my boxes' ability to blend.

 

While I didn't discuss this issue in detail in this very old thread, I did discuss it in the thread that was current as of last week.

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Actually the new ACU pattern is the resurrection of the old Duo-Tex pattern that was used by the 2D ACR in the FRG during the early eighties. The pattern works well at a distance, but up close, the straight lines of the pixels are a dead giveaway that it's man-made. Therefore, I don't think it would work well for geocaching.

 

Would creating smaller pixels help it be less noticeable at closer distances? I ask because I've seen some pictures that seem to be pretty close up of rifles and other items painted in this camo that look like they blend in pretty well.

Edited by QC 49ers
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While some of the paint jobs seen in previous posts are nice, one of the main principles of camo has been neglected. In trying to camo something, breaking up the shape of the item can be more important than what color or pattern you paint on it. Just how many "straight lines" do you find in nature???

I'm pretty pleased with my boxes' ability to blend.

 

While I didn't discuss this issue in detail in this very old thread, I did discuss it in the thread that was current as of last week.

 

I'm glad you are!!!! It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. Even so-called "well hidden" caches hidden in fallen tree limbs are fairly easy to find if you are observant and notice the straight "cut line" left by a saw blade. Paint on and cache on!!!!!!

Edited by eagletrek
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Actually the new ACU pattern is the resurrection of the old Duo-Tex pattern that was used by the 2D ACR in the FRG during the early eighties. The pattern works well at a distance, but up close, the straight lines of the pixels are a dead giveaway that it's man-made. Therefore, I don't think it would work well for geocaching.

 

Would creating smaller pixels help it be less noticeable at closer distances? I ask because I've seen some pictures that seem to be pretty close up of rifles and other items painted in this camo that look like they blend in pretty well.

 

How close is close???? I guess you could try anything but an observant eye at close range, 10 feet or less, will probably pick up on the straight edges of the pixels thereby defeating the purpose of the pattern. BTW, I'd never use the ACU pattern as it would be really time consuming to paint.

Edited by eagletrek
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Straight lines:

In my short caching experience, I have found Geocaches when I wasn’t even hunting. I’d be walking along a trail, see a “pee-path/geo-trail,” follow it and then see “geo-kindling” (small sticks placed together in straight lines on top of the cache.) I check cache for name, SL, and when I get home - look it up to post my find. It’s the straight lines that stand out. Same with a container … it’s the straight lines no matter what color or camo. Don’t get me wrong. Color/camo help to take the shine off but straight lines are what catch my eye.

 

As for the ACU pattern, Eagletrek is right … it’s more of a distance thing as well as a digital camera and satellite image thing. :lol:

 

I’ve learned a lot from this thread. Lucky I came across it. Might be a good idea if all tips and techniques for containers and camo were “pinned” in the Getting Started or Geocaching Topics. I know it’s a lot to ask someone to gleam through all the stuff to put it in one place but for folks getting started it’s hard to find what you’re looking for in the forums unless you spend hours reading everyday. And yes, I have used the Search. Type in “camo” or “container camo” on the Groundspeak Forums page and see what you get. And yes, I have used other sites to get info but isn’t Groundspeak suppose to be the home base of Geocaching? I’ve read in the forums that most cachers don’t read or post in this forum. I guess most folks find it easier to Google “container camo” or any other topic to get the info.

 

On a positive note, I am so glad I found this game/past-time. I’m having a lot of fun hunting caches and have got to know some great folks … face-to-face and online.

 

Happy Trails

:lol:

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Actually the new ACU pattern is the resurrection of the old Duo-Tex pattern that was used by the 2D ACR in the FRG during the early eighties. The pattern works well at a distance, but up close, the straight lines of the pixels are a dead giveaway that it's man-made. Therefore, I don't think it would work well for geocaching.

 

Would creating smaller pixels help it be less noticeable at closer distances? I ask because I've seen some pictures that seem to be pretty close up of rifles and other items painted in this camo that look like they blend in pretty well.

 

How close is close???? I guess you could try anything but an observant eye at close range, 10 feet or less, will probably pick up on the straight edges of the pixels thereby defeating the purpose of the pattern. BTW, I'd never use the ACU pattern as it would be really time consuming to paint.

 

I agree, it would be time consuming, however, if it would work it would be worth it. The pictures I saw were probably from 5-10 feet away. I'm just asking your opinion because I assume you probobly know more about it than I do. Thanks for the input.

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While some of the paint jobs seen in previous posts are nice, one of the main principles of camo has been neglected. In trying to camo something, breaking up the shape of the item can be more important than what color or pattern you paint on it. Just how many "straight lines" do you find in nature???
I'm pretty pleased with my boxes' ability to blend.

 

While I didn't discuss this issue in detail in this very old thread, I did discuss it in the thread that was current as of last week.

I'm glad you are!!!! It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. Even so-called "well hidden" caches hidden in fallen tree limbs are fairly easy to find if you are observant and notice the straight "cut line" left by a saw blade. Paint on and cache on!!!!!!
Good grief. What is your point? Should we not use ammo cans because they are squarish? Should we not bother camo painting them because no paint job will perfectly camo the can to hide it from close-up inspection?

 

Here's my post from the much, much more current thread.

 

While you will never absoluitely do away with the squareness and 'straight-line' of an ammo box merely using paint, you can break up the shape by 'layering' the camo and 'wrapping' the lines around the edges.

I never remove the old paint or sand or anything. I use three colors of Rustoleum camo paint.
  1. I first spray over the lettering and any rusty areas using 'army green'. This basically will leave you with a completely green ammo can.
  2. Next I place leafy twigs on the box (typically) from a 'burning bush' shrub in our back yard.
  3. Spray diagonal lines of paint, using 'earth brown'. Neatness doesn't count. The lines shouldn't be straight and you are not going for coverage.
  4. Rearrange the twigs and spray diagonal lines of paint, using 'khaki' between the brown lines. (This will give your camo a layered look that will further break up the shape.)
  5. Allow the paint to dry (mostly) and turn the box to another side.
  6. Repeat steps 2-4, trying to get like colors to meet at the corners. This will also help break up the shape.
  7. Repeat step 6 until all sides are painted.
     
    Set this box in a shady area under a bush and it will mostly disappear.

26a30e43-0ca7-44d7-b3b9-9e40fdd5fc58.jpg

Edited by sbell111
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We have used the "textured" spray Paints...

Like Granite or sandstone, depending on woods/beach caches...

They blend in well...

or if you are going to brush on... just mix play sand in with the paint...

Then a FLAT clearcoat over the top... so it does not shine...

 

But the sparayon textured paints work well, as long as you lightly sand the ammo can first...

the flat clearcoat just makes it more corrosion resistant...

we have one placed in some pine trees that has even had some moss start growing on it...

Edited by Peconic Bay Sailors
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While some of the paint jobs seen in previous posts are nice, one of the main principles of camo has been neglected. In trying to camo something, breaking up the shape of the item can be more important than what color or pattern you paint on it. Just how many "straight lines" do you find in nature???
I'm pretty pleased with my boxes' ability to blend.

 

While I didn't discuss this issue in detail in this very old thread, I did discuss it in the thread that was current as of last week.

I'm glad you are!!!! It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. Even so-called "well hidden" caches hidden in fallen tree limbs are fairly easy to find if you are observant and notice the straight "cut line" left by a saw blade. Paint on and cache on!!!!!!
Good grief. What is your point? Should we not use ammo cans because they are squarish? Should we not bother camo painting them because no paint job will perfectly camo the can to hide it from close-up inspection?

 

Here's my post from the much, much more current thread.

 

While you will never absoluitely do away with the squareness and 'straight-line' of an ammo box merely using paint, you can break up the shape by 'layering' the camo and 'wrapping' the lines around the edges.

I never remove the old paint or sand or anything. I use three colors of Rustoleum camo paint.
  1. I first spray over the lettering and any rusty areas using 'army green'. This basically will leave you with a completely green ammo can.
  2. Next I place leafy twigs on the box (typically) from a 'burning bush' shrub in our back yard.
  3. Spray diagonal lines of paint, using 'earth brown'. Neatness doesn't count. The lines shouldn't be straight and you are not going for coverage.
  4. Rearrange the twigs and spray diagonal lines of paint, using 'khaki' between the brown lines. (This will give your camo a layered look that will further break up the shape.)
  5. Allow the paint to dry (mostly) and turn the box to another side.
  6. Repeat steps 2-4, trying to get like colors to meet at the corners. This will also help break up the shape.
  7. Repeat step 6 until all sides are painted.
     
    Set this box in a shady area under a bush and it will mostly disappear.

26a30e43-0ca7-44d7-b3b9-9e40fdd5fc58.jpg

 

Who said we shouldn't use ammo cans????? What I did say was that you don't find too many straight lines in nature. That said, no matter how sexy your paint job is, the box will be easily found by a trained eye if the straight edges of the can are not dealt with. Your "layering of the paint and wrapping technique" do little to break up the shape of the container. Adding foliage or other materials to the outside of the ammo can will actually breakup its shape, thereby eliminating those tell-tale straight lines and making it harder to spot.

 

But then again, based on my observations of your numerous pasts posts on numerous subjects, you know everything so please disregard all above. Target ....... Cease Fire!!!!!!!!!

Link to comment
While some of the paint jobs seen in previous posts are nice, one of the main principles of camo has been neglected. In trying to camo something, breaking up the shape of the item can be more important than what color or pattern you paint on it. Just how many "straight lines" do you find in nature???
I'm pretty pleased with my boxes' ability to blend.

 

While I didn't discuss this issue in detail in this very old thread, I did discuss it in the thread that was current as of last week.

I'm glad you are!!!! It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. Even so-called "well hidden" caches hidden in fallen tree limbs are fairly easy to find if you are observant and notice the straight "cut line" left by a saw blade. Paint on and cache on!!!!!!
Good grief. What is your point? Should we not use ammo cans because they are squarish? Should we not bother camo painting them because no paint job will perfectly camo the can to hide it from close-up inspection?

 

Here's my post from the much, much more current thread.

 

While you will never absoluitely do away with the squareness and 'straight-line' of an ammo box merely using paint, you can break up the shape by 'layering' the camo and 'wrapping' the lines around the edges.

I never remove the old paint or sand or anything. I use three colors of Rustoleum camo paint.
  1. I first spray over the lettering and any rusty areas using 'army green'. This basically will leave you with a completely green ammo can.
  2. Next I place leafy twigs on the box (typically) from a 'burning bush' shrub in our back yard.
  3. Spray diagonal lines of paint, using 'earth brown'. Neatness doesn't count. The lines shouldn't be straight and you are not going for coverage.
  4. Rearrange the twigs and spray diagonal lines of paint, using 'khaki' between the brown lines. (This will give your camo a layered look that will further break up the shape.)
  5. Allow the paint to dry (mostly) and turn the box to another side.
  6. Repeat steps 2-4, trying to get like colors to meet at the corners. This will also help break up the shape.
  7. Repeat step 6 until all sides are painted.
     
    Set this box in a shady area under a bush and it will mostly disappear.

26a30e43-0ca7-44d7-b3b9-9e40fdd5fc58.jpg

Who said we shouldn't use ammo cans????? What I did say was that you don't find too many straight lines in nature. That said, no matter how sexy your paint job is, the box will be easily found by a trained eye if the straight edges of the can are not dealt with. Your "layering of the paint and wrapping technique" do little to break up the shape of the container. Adding foliage or other materials to the outside of the ammo can will actually breakup its shape, thereby eliminating those tell-tale straight lines and making it harder to spot.

 

But then again, based on my observations of your numerous pasts posts on numerous subjects, you know everything so please disregard all above. Target ....... Cease Fire!!!!!!!!!

I don't know everything, but I can recognize someone that insists on going to battle without ammunition. What I also don't know is why you tried to change the topic of a three year old thread.
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... It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. ...
There is nothing in nature that looks like a tank, but the military still paints them.

M1A1-Abrams-USMC-01.jpg

 

Yeah they do but we also try to hide them in natural surroundings to breakup their shape. But nowadays it doesn't make too much difference if you're going up against a threat who uses thermal sights.

Link to comment
While some of the paint jobs seen in previous posts are nice, one of the main principles of camo has been neglected. In trying to camo something, breaking up the shape of the item can be more important than what color or pattern you paint on it. Just how many "straight lines" do you find in nature???
I'm pretty pleased with my boxes' ability to blend.

 

While I didn't discuss this issue in detail in this very old thread, I did discuss it in the thread that was current as of last week.

I'm glad you are!!!! It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. Even so-called "well hidden" caches hidden in fallen tree limbs are fairly easy to find if you are observant and notice the straight "cut line" left by a saw blade. Paint on and cache on!!!!!!
Good grief. What is your point? Should we not use ammo cans because they are squarish? Should we not bother camo painting them because no paint job will perfectly camo the can to hide it from close-up inspection?

 

Here's my post from the much, much more current thread.

 

While you will never absoluitely do away with the squareness and 'straight-line' of an ammo box merely using paint, you can break up the shape by 'layering' the camo and 'wrapping' the lines around the edges.

I never remove the old paint or sand or anything. I use three colors of Rustoleum camo paint.
  1. I first spray over the lettering and any rusty areas using 'army green'. This basically will leave you with a completely green ammo can.
  2. Next I place leafy twigs on the box (typically) from a 'burning bush' shrub in our back yard.
  3. Spray diagonal lines of paint, using 'earth brown'. Neatness doesn't count. The lines shouldn't be straight and you are not going for coverage.
  4. Rearrange the twigs and spray diagonal lines of paint, using 'khaki' between the brown lines. (This will give your camo a layered look that will further break up the shape.)
  5. Allow the paint to dry (mostly) and turn the box to another side.
  6. Repeat steps 2-4, trying to get like colors to meet at the corners. This will also help break up the shape.
  7. Repeat step 6 until all sides are painted.
     
    Set this box in a shady area under a bush and it will mostly disappear.

26a30e43-0ca7-44d7-b3b9-9e40fdd5fc58.jpg

Who said we shouldn't use ammo cans????? What I did say was that you don't find too many straight lines in nature. That said, no matter how sexy your paint job is, the box will be easily found by a trained eye if the straight edges of the can are not dealt with. Your "layering of the paint and wrapping technique" do little to break up the shape of the container. Adding foliage or other materials to the outside of the ammo can will actually breakup its shape, thereby eliminating those tell-tale straight lines and making it harder to spot.

 

But then again, based on my observations of your numerous pasts posts on numerous subjects, you know everything so please disregard all above. Target ....... Cease Fire!!!!!!!!!

I don't know everything, but I can recognize someone that insists on going to battle without ammunition. What I also don't know is why you tried to change the topic of a three year old thread.

 

Once again you've failed to make the correct observation!!!! I go into battle fully armed!!!! I'm really fond of APFSDS-T with long rod penetrators!!!!!!

 

Wasn't trying to change the topic, Bucko, but only commenting that painting is not the end-all-and-be-all when it comes to properly camoing something. I'll fall back on my twenty plus years of experience in the military on how to properly camo things.

 

Quit flapping your gums (fingers) and you might learn something!!!!!

Link to comment
... It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. ...
There is nothing in nature that looks like a tank, but the military still paints them.
Yeah they do but we also try to hide them in natural surroundings to breakup their shape. ...
Exactly. Please see my post where I described the camo technique that I use. You'll note that it doesn't advise leaving the painted can out in the open. Edited by sbell111
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... It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. ...
There is nothing in nature that looks like a tank, but the military still paints them.
Yeah they do but we also try to hide them in natural surroundings to breakup their shape. ...
Exactly. Please see my post where I described the camo technique that I use. You'll note that it doesn't advise leaving the painted can out in the open.

 

Okay, so it will look like a slickly painted ammo can hiding under the shadows of a bush.

 

Why the hell am I responding to this????? I'm putting myself in the penalty box for engaging unarmed combatants!!!!!

 

OBTW, I could give you a class on how to hide a tank!!!!

Edited by eagletrek
Link to comment
While some of the paint jobs seen in previous posts are nice, one of the main principles of camo has been neglected. In trying to camo something, breaking up the shape of the item can be more important than what color or pattern you paint on it. Just how many "straight lines" do you find in nature???
I'm pretty pleased with my boxes' ability to blend.

 

While I didn't discuss this issue in detail in this very old thread, I did discuss it in the thread that was current as of last week.

I'm glad you are!!!! It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. Even so-called "well hidden" caches hidden in fallen tree limbs are fairly easy to find if you are observant and notice the straight "cut line" left by a saw blade. Paint on and cache on!!!!!!
Good grief. What is your point? Should we not use ammo cans because they are squarish? Should we not bother camo painting them because no paint job will perfectly camo the can to hide it from close-up inspection?

 

Here's my post from the much, much more current thread.

 

While you will never absoluitely do away with the squareness and 'straight-line' of an ammo box merely using paint, you can break up the shape by 'layering' the camo and 'wrapping' the lines around the edges.

I never remove the old paint or sand or anything. I use three colors of Rustoleum camo paint.
  1. I first spray over the lettering and any rusty areas using 'army green'. This basically will leave you with a completely green ammo can.
  2. Next I place leafy twigs on the box (typically) from a 'burning bush' shrub in our back yard.
  3. Spray diagonal lines of paint, using 'earth brown'. Neatness doesn't count. The lines shouldn't be straight and you are not going for coverage.
  4. Rearrange the twigs and spray diagonal lines of paint, using 'khaki' between the brown lines. (This will give your camo a layered look that will further break up the shape.)
  5. Allow the paint to dry (mostly) and turn the box to another side.
  6. Repeat steps 2-4, trying to get like colors to meet at the corners. This will also help break up the shape.
  7. Repeat step 6 until all sides are painted.
     
    Set this box in a shady area under a bush and it will mostly disappear.

26a30e43-0ca7-44d7-b3b9-9e40fdd5fc58.jpg

Who said we shouldn't use ammo cans????? What I did say was that you don't find too many straight lines in nature. That said, no matter how sexy your paint job is, the box will be easily found by a trained eye if the straight edges of the can are not dealt with. Your "layering of the paint and wrapping technique" do little to break up the shape of the container. Adding foliage or other materials to the outside of the ammo can will actually breakup its shape, thereby eliminating those tell-tale straight lines and making it harder to spot.

 

But then again, based on my observations of your numerous pasts posts on numerous subjects, you know everything so please disregard all above. Target ....... Cease Fire!!!!!!!!!

I don't know everything, but I can recognize someone that insists on going to battle without ammunition. What I also don't know is why you tried to change the topic of a three year old thread.
Once again you've failed to make the correct observation!!!! I go into battle fully armed!!!! I'm really fond of APFSDS-T with long rod penetrators!!!!!!

 

Wasn't trying to change the topic, Bucko, but only commenting that painting is not the end-all-and-be-all when it comes to properly camoing something.

You were certainly off topic.

 

The topic was 'Please post your tips/techniques and past experiences with what worked and didn't work when painting plastics, rubber, metal, etc.'

 

You chose to turn away from that topic to take some shots at the work of others. Perhaps you could share your camo techniques, rather than to just pop in to spout off.

I'll fall back on my twenty plus years of experience in the military on how to properly camo things.
While I admit that I didn't spend my years with a paint can in my hand, you are wrong to believe that you are the only one who has served his country.
Quit flapping your gums (fingers) and you might learn something!!!!!
You might pause long enough to realize that the forum has guidelines.
Link to comment
While some of the paint jobs seen in previous posts are nice, one of the main principles of camo has been neglected. In trying to camo something, breaking up the shape of the item can be more important than what color or pattern you paint on it. Just how many "straight lines" do you find in nature???
I'm pretty pleased with my boxes' ability to blend.

 

While I didn't discuss this issue in detail in this very old thread, I did discuss it in the thread that was current as of last week.

I'm glad you are!!!! It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. Even so-called "well hidden" caches hidden in fallen tree limbs are fairly easy to find if you are observant and notice the straight "cut line" left by a saw blade. Paint on and cache on!!!!!!
Good grief. What is your point? Should we not use ammo cans because they are squarish? Should we not bother camo painting them because no paint job will perfectly camo the can to hide it from close-up inspection?

 

Here's my post from the much, much more current thread.

 

While you will never absoluitely do away with the squareness and 'straight-line' of an ammo box merely using paint, you can break up the shape by 'layering' the camo and 'wrapping' the lines around the edges.

I never remove the old paint or sand or anything. I use three colors of Rustoleum camo paint.
  1. I first spray over the lettering and any rusty areas using 'army green'. This basically will leave you with a completely green ammo can.
  2. Next I place leafy twigs on the box (typically) from a 'burning bush' shrub in our back yard.
  3. Spray diagonal lines of paint, using 'earth brown'. Neatness doesn't count. The lines shouldn't be straight and you are not going for coverage.
  4. Rearrange the twigs and spray diagonal lines of paint, using 'khaki' between the brown lines. (This will give your camo a layered look that will further break up the shape.)
  5. Allow the paint to dry (mostly) and turn the box to another side.
  6. Repeat steps 2-4, trying to get like colors to meet at the corners. This will also help break up the shape.
  7. Repeat step 6 until all sides are painted.
     
    Set this box in a shady area under a bush and it will mostly disappear.

26a30e43-0ca7-44d7-b3b9-9e40fdd5fc58.jpg

Who said we shouldn't use ammo cans????? What I did say was that you don't find too many straight lines in nature. That said, no matter how sexy your paint job is, the box will be easily found by a trained eye if the straight edges of the can are not dealt with. Your "layering of the paint and wrapping technique" do little to break up the shape of the container. Adding foliage or other materials to the outside of the ammo can will actually breakup its shape, thereby eliminating those tell-tale straight lines and making it harder to spot.

 

But then again, based on my observations of your numerous pasts posts on numerous subjects, you know everything so please disregard all above. Target ....... Cease Fire!!!!!!!!!

I don't know everything, but I can recognize someone that insists on going to battle without ammunition. What I also don't know is why you tried to change the topic of a three year old thread.
Once again you've failed to make the correct observation!!!! I go into battle fully armed!!!! I'm really fond of APFSDS-T with long rod penetrators!!!!!!

 

Wasn't trying to change the topic, Bucko, but only commenting that painting is not the end-all-and-be-all when it comes to properly camoing something.

You were certainly off topic.

 

The topic was 'Please post your tips/techniques and past experiences with what worked and didn't work when painting plastics, rubber, metal, etc.'

 

You chose to turn away from that topic to take some shots at the work of others. Perhaps you could share your camo techniques, rather than to just pop in to spout off.

I'll fall back on my twenty plus years of experience in the military on how to properly camo things.
While I admit that I didn't spend my years with a paint can in my hand, you are wrong to believe that you are the only one who has served his country.
Quit flapping your gums (fingers) and you might learn something!!!!!
You might pause long enough to realize that the forum has guidelines.

 

If you need to, go run to daddy!!!!

Link to comment
... It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. ...
There is nothing in nature that looks like a tank, but the military still paints them.
Yeah they do but we also try to hide them in natural surroundings to breakup their shape. ...
Exactly. Please see my post where I described the camo technique that I use. You'll note that it doesn't advise leaving the painted can out in the open.
Okay, so it will look like a slickly painted ammo can hiding under the shadows of a bush.

 

Why the hell am I responding to this????? I'm putting myself in the penalty box for engaging unarmed combatants!!!!!

 

OBTW, I could give you a class on how to hide a tank!!!!

Since you haven't shared your efforts, one has to believe that you are merely trolling.
Link to comment
... It still doesn't change the fact that there aren't too many places in nature where straight lines exist. ...
There is nothing in nature that looks like a tank, but the military still paints them.
Yeah they do but we also try to hide them in natural surroundings to breakup their shape. ...
Exactly. Please see my post where I described the camo technique that I use. You'll note that it doesn't advise leaving the painted can out in the open.
Okay, so it will look like a slickly painted ammo can hiding under the shadows of a bush.

 

Why the hell am I responding to this????? I'm putting myself in the penalty box for engaging unarmed combatants!!!!!

 

OBTW, I could give you a class on how to hide a tank!!!!

Since you haven't shared your efforts, one has to believe that you are merely trolling.

 

I believe me commenting on how to hide a tank would require an entirely new thread!!!!

 

As far as how I camo my ammo cans, it all depends where they'll be hidden. I use a three color pattern, green, black, brown or gray, black/brown, tan. The colors are really used to cut the sheen and create a shadow effect. The real trick is to find the appropriate natural surroundings (hole, crevice, etc..) to hide it in so its boxy shape it not noticable to the seeker. I always have a good laugh when I find and ammo can hidden under a bunch of broken sticks and twigs!!!!!! But then again, most folks don't really understand how to use their natural surroundings to hide things.

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As far as how I camo my ammo cans, it all depends where they'll be hidden. I use a three color pattern, green, black, brown or gray, black/brown, tan. The colors are really used to cut the sheen and create a shadow effect. The real trick is to find the appropriate natural surroundings (hole, crevice, etc..) to hide it in so its boxy shape it not noticable to the seeker. ...
So, basically your position is that you agree with everyone that you disagreed with just a few posts above.

 

Interesting.

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As far as how I camo my ammo cans, it all depends where they'll be hidden. I use a three color pattern, green, black, brown or gray, black/brown, tan. The colors are really used to cut the sheen and create a shadow effect. The real trick is to find the appropriate natural surroundings (hole, crevice, etc..) to hide it in so its boxy shape it not noticable to the seeker. ...
So, basically your position is that you agree with everyone that you disagreed with just a few posts above.

 

Interesting.

 

No. I really don't care how many colors are used or what pattern is painted on it, if the actual shape of the can is not broken up by use of additions to the can or by placing it in a spot concealed from view, other then under a bush, then all the paint in the world doesn't really make a difference.

 

I paint my cans to reduce sheen and create a shadow effect to enhance the camo effect provided by the primary hiding place like a hole, crevice, tree trunk, ICBM silo, etc.... The paint job is really providing a secondary effect.

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Has anyone tried making the newer camo that the military is using? Like this..

 

digitalcamo_sm.jpg

 

Actually the new ACU pattern is the resurrection of the old Duo-Tex pattern that was used by the 2D ACR in the FRG during the early eighties. The pattern works well at a distance, but up close, the straight lines of the pixels are a dead giveaway that it's man-made. Therefore, I don't think it would work well for geocaching.

 

Though this does resemble the ACU pattern, I believe this to be MARPAT which is used by the Marines which blends in much better IMHO.

 

And yes, I have used this pattern to camo some containers and other items. It is very easy to use to breakup the outlines and give them shadows to help conceal things from the untrained eye. I use a stencil I cut from plastic stencil sheets. Here is the pattern I use:

Digital.jpg

I just spray alternating colors until I get the effect I want.

You can print this pattern on any printer in any size you need for the size container you are using. You can even cut the pattern out from paper to make a disposable stencil. Or use the cutout waste as you would natural stencils (reverse stencil).

 

More stencils are available here with step by step on how I make my stencils: Leads to a KTAG forum

 

v/r

O-Mega

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Well, that makes two other people that have found the tape in the Walmart hunting section. I guess that "gig is up". Bummer. Love the Flekstone idea though, hmmmm.

 

My walmart has it in the tool section with all the other duct tapes...

I hate that camo tape. Unless it is cloth camo tape it seems like a cheap and dirty way to do something.

 

I like the camo cloth they sell in the fabrics section at walmart. Depending on how you put it on you can create fringes and it is more likely to be camo'd (IMO).

Edited by knight2000
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rakecamo.jpg

 

Here are some I just did. I got tired of my stencil leaves getting all gunked up with paint and getting paint all over my fingers, so I picked up a small garden rake nearby and went at it. I think it might work out OK for the grassy chaparral & sandstone where these will be going. What do you think?

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I paint my cans to reduce sheen and create a shadow effect to enhance the camo effect provided by the primary hiding place like a hole, crevice, tree trunk, ICBM silo, etc.... The paint job is really providing a secondary effect.

 

Let's see 'em...

 

Feel free to find them as they're out there to be found!!! :laughing:

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Has anyone tried making the newer camo that the military is using? Like this..

 

digitalcamo_sm.jpg

 

Actually the new ACU pattern is the resurrection of the old Duo-Tex pattern that was used by the 2D ACR in the FRG during the early eighties. The pattern works well at a distance, but up close, the straight lines of the pixels are a dead giveaway that it's man-made. Therefore, I don't think it would work well for geocaching.

 

Though this does resemble the ACU pattern, I believe this to be MARPAT which is used by the Marines which blends in much better IMHO.

 

And yes, I have used this pattern to camo some containers and other items. It is very easy to use to breakup the outlines and give them shadows to help conceal things from the untrained eye. I use a stencil I cut from plastic stencil sheets. Here is the pattern I use:

Digital.jpg

I just spray alternating colors until I get the effect I want.

You can print this pattern on any printer in any size you need for the size container you are using. You can even cut the pattern out from paper to make a disposable stencil. Or use the cutout waste as you would natural stencils (reverse stencil).

 

More stencils are available here with step by step on how I make my stencils: Leads to a KTAG forum

 

v/r

O-Mega

 

Yeah, I believe you're right. It is MARPAT but except for the colors used, I really don't see too much difference between it and the Army's ACU pattern. That said, I still don't see how this pattern effectively breaks up the straight outlines of an ammo container without adding other "stuff" to the container.

 

Kudos for your time and effort in making stencils for this pattern. I'm "old school" and default to either the three or four color pattern used by NATO years ago.

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Yeah, I believe you're right. It is MARPAT but except for the colors used, I really don't see too much difference between it and the Army's ACU pattern. That said, I still don't see how this pattern effectively breaks up the straight outlines of an ammo container without adding other "stuff" to the container.

 

Kudos for your time and effort in making stencils for this pattern. I'm "old school" and default to either the three or four color pattern used by NATO years ago.

 

The colors are what makes these two entirely different patterns. I think the MARPAT color scheme is much more effective. This pattern is actually pretty good for breaking up the outlines, though I don't like the ACU/digital pattern as much as the natural patterns. The thing that you have to remember is that most camo is designed to hide the container from the casual observer. Once you are upon the object, there is very little you can do with paint to keep it from being found. The thing is to not attract the eye to an object, but to blend in,as seen in these shots. Of course the suroundings have alot to do with how an object blends in, whether camoed or not.

 

ACU.jpg

 

urban_camouflage_supermarket.jpg

 

notice-board-camouflage530.jpg

 

For close up camo you could always do one like these from another thread:

 

97222_600.JPG

97222_500.JPG

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There's also.. What brand is it. Krylon I think (I'll check and also run some tests later) Camo paint.

 

It's in muted natural colors, matte surface, and says it sticks to plastics fine. It's about $5/can at Wal-Mart. Pretty soon I'll let ya'll know if it actually sticks to plastic well or not. (I bought it for an ammo can)

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There's also.. What brand is it. Krylon I think (I'll check and also run some tests later) Camo paint.

 

It's in muted natural colors, matte surface, and says it sticks to plastics fine. It's about $5/can at Wal-Mart. Pretty soon I'll let ya'll know if it actually sticks to plastic well or not. (I bought it for an ammo can)

 

Krylon Fusion is the brand I use for plastic containers. It works great on plastic and metal but its more expensive so try and save it for my plastics. There is a great coat of green on most ammo boxes already so as long as the paint is for outdoor use it should do fine.

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There's also.. What brand is it. Krylon I think (I'll check and also run some tests later) Camo paint.

 

It's in muted natural colors, matte surface, and says it sticks to plastics fine. It's about $5/can at Wal-Mart. Pretty soon I'll let ya'll know if it actually sticks to plastic well or not. (I bought it for an ammo can)

 

Krylon Fusion is the brand I use for plastic containers. It works great on plastic and metal but its more expensive so try and save it for my plastics. There is a great coat of green on most ammo boxes already so as long as the paint is for outdoor use it should do fine.

 

This one was painted so I could stencil it, and I liked the looks of the camo colors. 'sides. Not that expensive, it's a bit more than a regular can but.. Feh, what's 3 bucks more for 2 cans? (I don't buy the cheap $1/can crap)

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rakecamo.jpg

 

Here are some I just did. I got tired of my stencil leaves getting all gunked up with paint and getting paint all over my fingers, so I picked up a small garden rake nearby and went at it. I think it might work out OK for the grassy chaparral & sandstone where these will be going. What do you think?

 

This looks a lot like the reed pattern that someone (Tinman4x ??) posted that they wanted to try. Cool - I know of places that these could go, but it would be very extremely wet and there may be a need to change the colour scheme at the changover from summer to fall.

 

I have had good results on ammo cans by sanding off any sheen, wiping them down and coating them with tremclad rust rejuvenator. After that, either the 'proper' cammo colours (khaki, olive green, brown and black - in that order) or the closest I can get to them in a cheaper brand.

 

Lock'n'locks I have found need to be sanded and Krylon paint for at least the first coat. The last ones I did, I used a paint that had a sand texture in it, that was suitable for outdoor use. This was the first coat, and the texturing, while not noticable at a distance as a rough surface, seemed cut down the reflection that you get from any smooth surface.

Skisidedown.

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... and there may be a need to change the colour scheme at the changover from summer to fall.

 

That's a 'trick' I keep in mind when camo'g containers. I'll paint 2 sides & half the exposed top with a darker background (Olive Drab) & the other half with light-colored bg (Desert Sand/Khaki) .... then just trust cachers to orient 'em the correct way when replacing. (Yeah....THAT works! *LOL*)

 

But sa-a-a-y-y-y...I kinda like this camo pattern of obxnomad's!66e465e5-e30c-45f3-a95b-65901616498d.jpg

Bet it works great out there on the 'Banks'! :rolleyes:

 

~*

(Down East'r)

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You'd be amazed at how well the pattern blends with our bikini-clad cachers. LOL

Pictures. We need pictures. Fine, glisteningly slick brown-bellied nubile lasses, frolicin' in the sun PIXTURES, d00d!! Don't make me come down there!!

:rolleyes:

 

\oh......all in the name of geocaching research, of course!

~*

Edited by Star*Hopper
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Sanded the lock and locks, then sprayed with brown, green and black - using a small limb from a fir tree, and another leafy branch to get the effect we wanted. The best hide was a black L & L in a dark rock crevice..but it is very difficult to see. Flashlight and gloves help.

I love all the different hints above - thanks! We had also thought of the dog poo idea.......must be something "special" about us in BC???? Or wicked............. :unsure:

Edited by popokiiti
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