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What Irks you most?


avroair
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I remember a time I met a couple of geocachers in the field. One I recognised because I'd met him previously at an event. The other I didn't, so I said hello, we traded caching names and chatted a while. It wasn't until later I realised he was one of the most prolific cachers in the country. But for the purposes of a random encounter the fact he finds more caches in an average year than I found in a decade is irrelevant - he obviously didn't feel the need to mention it and it wouldn't have added any value to the conversation.

I disagree it would have added no value to the conversation. You spent time chatting about geocaching with one of the most prolific cachers in the country, someone with a wide range of experience in many different areas. And you had no idea who he was. Although I have no problem with him wanting to be anonymous, at the same time, I think that information would have, in fact, added value to the conversation. Unless, of course, you immediately got into your head, "What a braggart!" and focused on that instead of taking the information as simply helpful context rather than immediately assuming it was a display of ego.

 

Of course, the odds are he didn't say anything because he assumed you'd recognize his handle, perhaps suggesting an even bigger ego that you're giving him credit for. Me, I don't worry about how much ego someone has. They've found N caches. That's just a fact, and it really makes no difference to me whether they're telling me because they think I'd like to know or because they hoping it will crush me with the weight of their superior geocaching abilities.

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It irks me more when caches say "stealth required" and are hidden in a way where it isn't humanly possible to retrieve it without either looking Very Unusual Indeed, or taking a chance on the local yob activity and going past a dodgy looking area at silly-past-dark-o-clock. Or the ones that take you down a turning off an alleyway that obviously doesn't go anywhere, where muggles can and do appear regularly and without warning, and there's no reason anyone would normally be studying the electricity sub station in as much detail as you'd have to in order to find the cache.

For a while, these bugged me, but eventually I decided to just assume the CO is being funny and laugh along with him. Yeah, he probably isn't really trying to be funny and thinks these are reasonable hides, but I find them funny, so I just smile and don't worry about how I look to anyone, unless I'm worried about getting arrested.

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I remember a time I met a couple of geocachers in the field. One I recognised because I'd met him previously at an event. The other I didn't, so I said hello, we traded caching names and chatted a while. It wasn't until later I realised he was one of the most prolific cachers in the country. But for the purposes of a random encounter the fact he finds more caches in an average year than I found in a decade is irrelevant - he obviously didn't feel the need to mention it and it wouldn't have added any value to the conversation.

I disagree it would have added no value to the conversation. You spent time chatting about geocaching with one of the most prolific cachers in the country, someone with a wide range of experience in many different areas. And you had no idea who he was. Although I have no problem with him wanting to be anonymous, at the same time, I think that information would have, in fact, added value to the conversation. Unless, of course, you immediately got into your head, "What a braggart!" and focused on that instead of taking the information as simply helpful context rather than immediately assuming it was a display of ego.

 

Of course, the odds are he didn't say anything because he assumed you'd recognize his handle, perhaps suggesting an even bigger ego that you're giving him credit for. Me, I don't worry about how much ego someone has. They've found N caches. That's just a fact, and it really makes no difference to me whether they're telling me because they think I'd like to know or because they hoping it will crush me with the weight of their superior geocaching abilities.

 

No reason not to mention how many caches he had found in the course of conversation but an opening gambit of "I'm XXXX, I've found X thousand caches" is a bit of a pretentious introduction, don't you think? If, while chatting to him, the topic of find counts cropped up he could have mentioned an accurate number if he so chose, or he could have said something a bit vague like "I get out and cache a lot so I've chalked up a few" or whatever he wanted.

 

I assumed he didn't mention his find count because he's not a braggart. In the context of the chance meeting it wasn't relevant any more than his income or the car he drives or how big his house is were relevant. He certainly didn't come across as someone who expected any form of deference, he came across as a regular kind of guy who didn't shove his achievements in anyone's face.

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That most times anything that isn't praise and is strong but factual criticism is reported by a ton of weenies that think life should be nothing but rainbows and unicorns. Can't stand a number of people who post, but I'm no weenie and rarely if at all reported anyone. If I didn't like it, I just stop reading. Makes me think these are the same folks that throw their own families under the bus.

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That most times anything that isn't praise and is strong but factual criticism is reported by a ton of weenies that think life should be nothing but rainbows and unicorns. Can't stand a number of people who post, but I'm no weenie and rarely if at all reported anyone. If I didn't like it, I just stop reading. Makes me think these are the same folks that throw their own families under the bus.

Dude, you need help <_<

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That most times anything that isn't praise and is strong but factual criticism is reported by a ton of weenies that think life should be nothing but rainbows and unicorns. Can't stand a number of people who post, but I'm no weenie and rarely if at all reported anyone. If I didn't like it, I just stop reading. Makes me think these are the same folks that throw their own families under the bus.

Dude, you need help <_<

 

That and perhaps some English lessons. I can't understand a word of what he wrote. :unsure:

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That most times anything that isn't praise and is strong but factual criticism is reported by a ton of weenies that think life should be nothing but rainbows and unicorns. Can't stand a number of people who post, but I'm no weenie and rarely if at all reported anyone. If I didn't like it, I just stop reading. Makes me think these are the same folks that throw their own families under the bus.

Dude, you need help dry.gif

 

That and perhaps some English lessons. I can't understand a word of what he wrote. :unsure:

 

He may have been battling a storm at the time he made that post. :laughing: But, a translation would be nice.

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Challenges in general. There are some interesting ones out there, but the ones which require you to spend hours and hours in front of a screen sifting through previous finds OR forcing yourself to do caches you wouldn't otherwise be interested in seem completely pointless and nauseating to me. I just don't get how that's fun. :wacko:

Edited by The_Incredibles_
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Challenges in general. There are some interesting ones out there, but the ones which require you to spend hours and hours in front of a screen sifting through previous finds OR forcing yourself to do caches you wouldn't otherwise be interested in seem completely pointless and nauseating to me. I just don't get how that's fun. :wacko:

 

Puzzles in general. There are some interesting ones out there, but the ones which require you to spend hours and hours in front of a screen sifting through information OR forcing yourself to research stuf you wouldn't otherwise be interested in seems completely pointless and nauseating to me. I just don't get how that's fun. :wacko:

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Challenges in general. There are some interesting ones out there, but the ones which require you to spend hours and hours in front of a screen sifting through previous finds OR forcing yourself to do caches you wouldn't otherwise be interested in seem completely pointless and nauseating to me. I just don't get how that's fun. :wacko:

 

Puzzles in general. There are some interesting ones out there, but the ones which require you to spend hours and hours in front of a screen sifting through information OR forcing yourself to research stuf you wouldn't otherwise be interested in seems completely pointless and nauseating to me. I just don't get how that's fun. :wacko:

 

Agreed. I don't like this type of puzzle either. The only reason I do them is to avoid proximity bumps when I'm placing a cache. Last time I was forced to Google sheep breeds, I survived the ordeal by inserting an unfolded paper-clip under one of my fingernails. That, and keeping a puke bucket next to the computer. :o

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Challenges in general. There are some interesting ones out there, but the ones which require you to spend hours and hours in front of a screen sifting through previous finds OR forcing yourself to do caches you wouldn't otherwise be interested in seem completely pointless and nauseating to me. I just don't get how that's fun. :wacko:

 

Puzzles in general. There are some interesting ones out there, but the ones which require you to spend hours and hours in front of a screen sifting through information OR forcing yourself to research stuf you wouldn't otherwise be interested in seems completely pointless and nauseating to me. I just don't get how that's fun. :wacko:

 

Agreed. I don't like this type of puzzle either. The only reason I do them is to avoid proximity bumps when I'm placing a cache. Last time I was forced to Google sheep breeds, I survived the ordeal by inserting an unfolded paper-clip under one of my fingernails. That, and keeping a puke bucket next to the computer. :o

 

So considering you know the final location of a challenge cache that's one less thing that sucks about challenges so I assume we agree that puzzle caches suck more than challenge caches as long as it's not a challenge cache requiring one to place more puzzle caches.

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So considering you know the final location of a challenge cache that's one less thing that sucks about challenges so I assume we agree that puzzle caches suck more than challenge caches as long as it's not a challenge cache requiring one to place more puzzle caches.

 

You're right, at least with challenge caches you know where to bring the gasoline and matches. :D

Edited by The_Incredibles_
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Challenges in general.

 

Wow. For someone who claimed they "didn't really care," you sure have a problem with challenges, don't you? Enough to say that it is your main peeve with caching!

 

You know what irks me? People who feel entitled to have everyone's caching experience modeled on what they like.

Edited by fizzymagic
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Challenges in general.

 

Wow. For someone who claimed they "didn't really care," you sure have a problem with challenges, don't you? Enough to say that it is your main peeve with caching!

 

You know what irks me? People who feel entitled to have everyone's caching experience modeled on what they like.

 

Run out of batons tonight?

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Wrong size of plastic baggies.

 

And too much paper to go through.

 

Some CO just dont want to maintenance their caches at all, so they stuff the cache with more paper than necessary! I just might throw some paper away if its too full! Oh I had... :ph34r: I had see a cache container so full of paper for like 1000's finds and the cache only get like 20 finds a year. :rolleyes:

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Mich ärgert das TB und Coins einfach entnommen werden ohne die jemals wieder aus - oder ein zuloggen!!! Solchen Leuten müsste dieses Spiel

verwehrt werden.

 

What irks me is that google translate doesn't know idiomatic localized geocaching terminology. This is how it translates the prior statement:

 

I am annoyed that TB and Coins are easily removed without ever again - or a zuloggen! Such people would have this game be denied.

 

What's a "zuloggen"?

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Challenges in general.

 

Wow. For someone who claimed they "didn't really care," you sure have a problem with challenges, don't you? Enough to say that it is your main peeve with caching!

 

You know what irks me? People who feel entitled to have everyone's caching experience modeled on what they like.

 

Run out of batons tonight?

 

I don't get the batons reference, but fizzymagic is correct in his assessment. Why would something that is obviously fun for other people bother you? I was trying to find a single word to describe this, and the best I could come up with is curmudgeon.

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Challenges in general.

 

Wow. For someone who claimed they "didn't really care," you sure have a problem with challenges, don't you? Enough to say that it is your main peeve with caching!

 

You know what irks me? People who feel entitled to have everyone's caching experience modeled on what they like.

 

Run out of batons tonight?

 

I don't get the batons reference, but fizzymagic is correct in his assessment. Why would something that is obviously fun for other people bother you? I was trying to find a single word to describe this, and the best I could come up with is curmudgeon.

 

The same thing was said about micro spam numerous times in 2005. "If you don't like em, then ignore them" was the advice.

 

 

Next, people stopped writing meaningful things inside of the logbook, and just signed their nickname. Then they also stopped trading any type of swag, as most caches didn't have any. They also started copy and pasting online logs and not rehiding caches too well to save time. It's a little hard to ignore them now..

 

Recently I have had a pair of new cachers send me several emails and posted a few notes on a puzzle that was missing. Since they solved it and visited ground zero they insist that I should award them with a "find". I tried explaining to them that a find is not a reward, but a statement of fact. However they are unable to comprehend this. Personally, I have a pretty liberal definition of a find, which means that you don't necessarily have to sign it , but at least have to touch the container, or at least a piece of it. I also don't do audits or log deletions anyway, in the event of a fake find anyhow. But somehow, they still wanted me to award them with a "find" , and post it "with permission of the CO". This "awarding finds" mentality is officially reinforced from Challenges. We already have COs awarding FTFs and other nonsense for various reasons. After they have had several other COs do this, I was expected to do the same. They believe that I "entered into an agreement" by placing the cache, and if it wasn't there, then they deserve the "find" award. No, I am not kidding. If someone finds a puzzle, they don't have to prove they solved it, and I don't see why people who find Challenges have to prove anything either.

 

How about a little checkbox added to the find log that says you also completed the Challenge? Then all of the completed Challenges could be tabulated somewhere?

 

I find it rather strange that posters are told to ignore challenges and be quiet, but those same people are unable to ignore their posts that call for a change. :D

Edited by 4wheelin_fool
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Challenges in general.

 

Wow. For someone who claimed they "didn't really care," you sure have a problem with challenges, don't you? Enough to say that it is your main peeve with caching!

 

You know what irks me? People who feel entitled to have everyone's caching experience modeled on what they like.

 

Run out of batons tonight?

 

I don't get the batons reference, but fizzymagic is correct in his assessment. Why would something that is obviously fun for other people bother you?

 

If you were to ask that question outside the context of geocaching you might get your answer. There are all sort of things that someone might do for fun that can have a significant negative impact on someone that isn't participating in that activity. I can also think of several things that some geocachers do for fun that have an negative impact on the game as a whole.

 

 

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a find is not a reward, but a statement of fact

This is the number one thing I don't like about Challenge caches. They turned the find into a reward and no longer a personal way to record the caches you have found. Quoting Jeremy Irish:

snapback.pngJeremy, on 09 August 2011 - 02:03 PM, said:

 

The problem is you can't claim a found it log, even though you found it. You may not have a problem with that, but I do. A found it log means you found it. That's why it is called a found it log.

Edited by L0ne.R
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Challenges in general.

 

Wow. For someone who claimed they "didn't really care," you sure have a problem with challenges, don't you? Enough to say that it is your main peeve with caching!

 

You know what irks me? People who feel entitled to have everyone's caching experience modeled on what they like.

 

Run out of batons tonight?

 

I don't get the batons reference, but fizzymagic is correct in his assessment. Why would something that is obviously fun for other people bother you?

 

If you were to ask that question outside the context of geocaching you might get your answer. There are all sort of things that someone might do for fun that can have a significant negative impact on someone that isn't participating in that activity. I can also think of several things that some geocachers do for fun that have an negative impact on the game as a whole.

 

But this thread is in the context of geocaching, and some of its allegedly irksome aspects.

 

Are you suggesting that the existence and enjoyment of challenges has a negative impact on the game as a whole?

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a find is not a reward, but a statement of fact

This is the number one thing I don't like about Challenge caches. They turned the find into a reward and no longer a personal way to record the caches you have found. Quoting Jeremy Irish:

snapback.pngJeremy, on 09 August 2011 - 02:03 PM, said:

 

The problem is you can't claim a found it log, even though you found it. You may not have a problem with that, but I do. A found it log means you found it. That's why it is called a found it log.

And here is another quote of Jeremy:

 

Bickering over the rules of a cache "find" was never the intent of Geocaching.com. There's no prize, no leaderboard, and no trophy, so there's no reason to get your knickers in a twist about anyone else's definition of a find.
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I'll point out that calling someone a curmudgeon for sharing an opinion could have a negative impact on the forums. Usually the best response is to try to persuade someone to change their opinion. Somehow this doesn't always work, so the posters resort to telling them to be quiet, or to use some form of name calling. And these tactics usually have the opposite effect of getting them to change their opinion..

Edited by 4wheelin_fool
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a find is not a reward, but a statement of fact

 

This is the number one thing I don't like about Challenge caches. They turned the find into a reward and no longer a personal way to record the caches you have found. Quoting Jeremy Irish:

snapback.pngJeremy, on 09 August 2011 - 02:03 PM, said:

 

The problem is you can't claim a found it log, even though you found it. You may not have a problem with that, but I do. A found it log means you found it. That's why it is called a found it log.

And here is another quote of Jeremy:

 

Bickering over the rules of a cache "find" was never the intent of Geocaching.com. There's no prize, no leaderboard, and no trophy, so there's no reason to get your knickers in a twist about anyone else's definition of a find.

 

Sounds reasonable to me. If I want to claim a find on a challenge cache because I found it, there's no reason to get your knickers in a twist about my definition of a find.

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a find is not a reward, but a statement of fact

 

This is the number one thing I don't like about Challenge caches. They turned the find into a reward and no longer a personal way to record the caches you have found. Quoting Jeremy Irish:

snapback.pngJeremy, on 09 August 2011 - 02:03 PM, said:

 

The problem is you can't claim a found it log, even though you found it. You may not have a problem with that, but I do. A found it log means you found it. That's why it is called a found it log.

And here is another quote of Jeremy:

 

Bickering over the rules of a cache "find" was never the intent of Geocaching.com. There's no prize, no leaderboard, and no trophy, so there's no reason to get your knickers in a twist about anyone else's definition of a find.

 

Sounds reasonable to me. If I want to claim a find on a challenge cache because I found it, there's no reason to get your knickers in a twist about my definition of a find.

Correct... We got a CO that will deny your challenge find because one of caches you found is listed as small but its really a micro. :ph34r:

Edited by SwineFlew
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I'll point out that calling someone a curmudgeon for sharing an opinion could have a negative impact on the forums. Usually the best response is to try to persuade someone to change their opinion. Somehow this doesn't always work, so the posters resort to telling them to be quiet, or to use some form of name calling. And these tactics usually have the opposite effect of getting them to change their opinion..

 

I am not a lawyer, but I play one in traffic court for my friends.

 

If you read what I wrote, you will note that I don't directly call anyone a name -- I was looking for a word to describe "this" behavior. You are also making an assumption that "curmudgeon" is negative.

 

Conspicuously absent in your post is any indication that the "batons" crack would also have a negative impact on the forum -- maybe because you also don't know what it means? I think, though, that it is fair to say that it isn't a good thing, given its context.

 

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Challenges in general.

 

Wow. For someone who claimed they "didn't really care," you sure have a problem with challenges, don't you? Enough to say that it is your main peeve with caching!

 

You know what irks me? People who feel entitled to have everyone's caching experience modeled on what they like.

 

Run out of batons tonight?

 

I don't get the batons reference, but fizzymagic is correct in his assessment. Why would something that is obviously fun for other people bother you?

 

If you were to ask that question outside the context of geocaching you might get your answer. There are all sort of things that someone might do for fun that can have a significant negative impact on someone that isn't participating in that activity. I can also think of several things that some geocachers do for fun that have an negative impact on the game as a whole.

 

But this thread is in the context of geocaching, and some of its allegedly irksome aspects.

 

Are you suggesting that the existence and enjoyment of challenges has a negative impact on the game as a whole?

 

No, I'm suggesting that there are activities that some geocacher may do "in the name of fun" that may make it less fun for others. It doesn't necessarily have to have a negative impact on the game as a whole. I have not doubt, however, that there are many areas where they have become so common that they're having a significant impact on how the game is played in that area.

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I'll point out that calling someone a curmudgeon for sharing an opinion could have a negative impact on the forums. Usually the best response is to try to persuade someone to change their opinion. Somehow this doesn't always work, so the posters resort to telling them to be quiet, or to use some form of name calling.

 

Somebody decides they want to get something banned just because they don't like it. And somehow I am supposed to convince them that it shouldn't be banned.

 

Sorry, you've put the shoe on the wrong foot. I don't have to explain to you why I enjoy something. I don't have to convince you that my enjoying it is "legitimate." The presumption is that people can enjoy something just because they enjoy it. The burden is on the person who wants to ban something to show convincing proof that it is harmful and that banning it would be a good thing.

 

Since neither you nor anyone else has presented any argument against challenge caches other than "I don't like them," the proper response is ridicule. Treating a fundamentally fallacious argument seriously gives those who make such arguments too much credibility.

 

The proper response to attempts to hurt other peoples' enjoyment of something for no reason other than you don't approve of them enjoying it is, indeed, "shut up." Unless you can make a rational, convincing case that something you don't like is so bad for caching as a whole that it should be banned, then you should expect to be laughed at.

 

Your so-called "arguments" so far have been laughable. Until they are no longer so, I will continue to point that fact out.

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What irks me the most right now, well, actually for the past year and a half, are cachers stealing caches. I have had about 20 ammo boxes stolen during this time...by other cachers. How do I know? Because I have been doing this a long time and my ammo boxes are generally hidden in places where no one other than a cacher would be going. Today I archived 2 more missing caches.

 

Over the years I have filled my containers with Cd's, book, DVDs, tools...and what is in them when I do maintenance? Cigarette butts, rocks from nearby, rusty bottle caps, cash register receipts, even had a blown out hiking boot...oh yeah, and the ever AWESOME foam shapes. REALLY?

 

The cachers today do not respectfully play, nor do they take the time to write something other than TFTC or found it. That's not how I was raised.

 

Thanks for listening.

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Went out to make a quick find and discovered hunting activity with 3 deer stands on property where it was not allowed. Didn't think too much about it until winter came and I was riding by the spot and noticed a small cooler near the trailhead. I think it was on a Friday or so. The following week it was still there, so I thought I would investigate and hike the area a little more thoroughly. The cooler had the organs of a large animal, what appeared to be the heart and liver of a deer with water and the remains of a couple of ice cubes and a few knives. I walked up the path and discovered a loaded crossbow which looked like it had been sitting a few days also. At that point I was just rather curious and amused, and did not really care too much about it. Then I noticed several empty Coors light cans Its strange how something like that could make the rest of it suddenly seem irratating. Lets see, they were leaving litter of some beer flavored spring water, drinking in a public area, poaching deer.. I measured the distance from the road and houses which was less than 200 feet, so it was a safety zone also. Then there is the leaving of a dangerous object in a place where a 13 year old would likely get into trouble with, and the fact that nobody would be expected to wear orange back here, and could get shot..

 

I discharged the crossbow, put it in my trunk and went to the town office to absolutely verify there was no hunting allowed there. Then I told someone I knew about it, and they said they would have someone check it out. That was the end of it...until summer.

 

I took another hike through there and discovered an arrow sticking in the ground. Nearby was a Cadillac hubcap, and a deer skull. Looking even closer, I noticed a wire mesh screen on the ground, with a little area hollowed out under it sided with bricks. There was a plastic otter box inside. There was no caches listed nearby or puzzles anywhere in the general vicinity. I thought maybe it just wasn't published, or was on another site, or someone's weird stash of some sort. Inside was an old hat and a few unusual items with a paper bag...which turned out to be someone's ashes. Geez, that was the last thing I wanted to find. I spoke to a policeman and confirmed that a public area was not the proper spot to create a shrine and dispose of human remains. He agreed and said that he would get the family to move it. He did know the people and said that they had problems with them before and that they were a "little weird". When I went to show him the area, we soon were covered with hundreds of tiny ticks. I wasn't phased by it, and neither was the cop who said he had grew up on a farm. However when he opened the mini crypt a spider jumped out and he jumped and squealed. :D Yes, it was the littering that irked me, and if it wasnt there I probably would not have minded the rest. I scraped the ticks off afterwards and applied some ointment, but they still swelled up to twice their size.

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a find is not a reward, but a statement of fact

 

This is the number one thing I don't like about Challenge caches. They turned the find into a reward and no longer a personal way to record the caches you have found. Quoting Jeremy Irish:

snapback.pngJeremy, on 09 August 2011 - 02:03 PM, said:

 

The problem is you can't claim a found it log, even though you found it. You may not have a problem with that, but I do. A found it log means you found it. That's why it is called a found it log.

And here is another quote of Jeremy:

 

Bickering over the rules of a cache "find" was never the intent of Geocaching.com. There's no prize, no leaderboard, and no trophy, so there's no reason to get your knickers in a twist about anyone else's definition of a find.

 

Sounds reasonable to me. If I want to claim a find on a challenge cache because I found it, there's no reason to get your knickers in a twist about my definition of a find.

 

Interesting. My definition of a "find" is that I figured out more or less where the cache was on a map on my laptop while sitting in my armchair with the TV on. Does that mean I can claim all those pesky 5/5 caches I'd never normally be able to reach?

 

Does it also mean that it's considered fair game to claim a "find" on a cache 50 feet up a tree on the basis the "finder" sighted it with both feet firmly on the ground?

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One of my biggest irks lately has been going after caches where the coordinates were obviously put in after they had walked out of the area. We have someone around here who tends to hide a cache, then walks back to the path or their car and uses those coordinates to mark the hide. We've had some that were a good 50 to 100 feet away from where the GPS led us and never would have found them if the person we were with didn't know their habits. Sure, the hunting is fun, but not when it's labeled as a park and grab and you're expecting it to be just off the trail then end up halfway down a ravine a mile in instead.

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I got a good one..

 

Those who find oodles of caches but don't give back by hiding <and maintaining> their own.

 

You just hit my nerve....right on...cachers with 6 or 8 thousand caches and 5 or maybe 17 hides.

They are just like leeches.

 

Ok, so this bothers me...I have just heard about Geocaching. My husband just retired from the Air Force, the kids are grown and on their own. We are have sold our home and bought a 5th wheel which we will be traveling and living in year round. I only have 14 finds under my belt, but we thought this would be a great way to see and learn so much history about our great land. Due to the fact that our home is now on wheels I am unable to doing any hiding of caches and maintain them as required. I have tried to do my part in properly returning the caches in the places they were found, report any damaged caches, and warned future finders of any dangers, such as wasp, spiders, etc. I want to continue on my searches with a clear mind. I will do what is asked of me to keep my name in good standings within the Geocaching community. My question is how do I explain my situation so that I am compared to "leeches"?

Edited by ktguthrie
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I got a good one..

 

Those who find oodles of caches but don't give back by hiding <and maintaining> their own.

 

You just hit my nerve....right on...cachers with 6 or 8 thousand caches and 5 or maybe 17 hides.

They are just like leeches.

 

Ok, so this bothers me...I have just heard about Geocaching. My husband just retired from the Air Force, the kids are grown and on their own. We are have sold our home and bought a 5th wheel which we will be traveling and living in year round. I only have 14 finds under my belt, but we thought this would be a great way to see and learn so much history about our great land. Due to the fact that our home is now on wheels I am unable to doing any hiding of caches and maintain them as required. I have tried to do my part in properly returning the caches in the places they were found, report any damaged caches, and warned future finders of any dangers, such as wasp, spiders, etc. I want to continue on my searches with a clear mind. I will do what is asked of me to keep my name in good standings within the Geocaching community. My question is how do I explain my situation so that I am compared to "leeches"?

I wouldn't worry about it too much. I think that people who have that opinion are in the minority.

 

Not everyone should have to own caches. You're a good example. There are other ways to give back to the sport - finding caches, writing nice logs, being a responsible cacher, holding events, being friendly and helpful in the forums and in person with other cachers, etc.

 

Sounds like you're doing fine. :-)

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I got a good one..

 

Those who find oodles of caches but don't give back by hiding <and maintaining> their own.

 

You just hit my nerve....right on...cachers with 6 or 8 thousand caches and 5 or maybe 17 hides.

They are just like leeches.

 

Ok, so this bothers me...I have just heard about Geocaching. My husband just retired from the Air Force, the kids are grown and on their own. We are have sold our home and bought a 5th wheel which we will be traveling and living in year round. I only have 14 finds under my belt, but we thought this would be a great way to see and learn so much history about our great land. Due to the fact that our home is now on wheels I am unable to doing any hiding of caches and maintain them as required. I have tried to do my part in properly returning the caches in the places they were found, report any damaged caches, and warned future finders of any dangers, such as wasp, spiders, etc. I want to continue on my searches with a clear mind. I will do what is asked of me to keep my name in good standings within the Geocaching community. My question is how do I explain my situation so that I am compared to "leeches"?

 

Groundspeak, the owners of Geocaching.com has have made it more then clear that it it is NOT necessary to hide caches in order to find them. This is because of situations such as yours as well as many others.

 

I find myself envious of you. My answer to the the age old question, "if you suddenly found yourself a millionaire", would be to buy myself a custom motor home and visit every corner of this country.

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I got a good one..

 

Those who find oodles of caches but don't give back by hiding <and maintaining> their own.

 

You just hit my nerve....right on...cachers with 6 or 8 thousand caches and 5 or maybe 17 hides.

They are just like leeches.

 

Ok, so this bothers me...I have just heard about Geocaching. My husband just retired from the Air Force, the kids are grown and on their own. We are have sold our home and bought a 5th wheel which we will be traveling and living in year round. I only have 14 finds under my belt, but we thought this would be a great way to see and learn so much history about our great land. Due to the fact that our home is now on wheels I am unable to doing any hiding of caches and maintain them as required. I have tried to do my part in properly returning the caches in the places they were found, report any damaged caches, and warned future finders of any dangers, such as wasp, spiders, etc. I want to continue on my searches with a clear mind. I will do what is asked of me to keep my name in good standings within the Geocaching community. My question is how do I explain my situation so that I am compared to "leeches"?

 

It's easy. Just ignore the people who say that you're a leech.

 

I've got 2200 finds and the only hide to date was an event back in 2005. I've often thought about placing a cache or two but I'd rather not hide one unless I'm in a position to keep it maintained. The areas that would be easiest for me to get to are mostly saturated, and I'd rather not place a cache than place one far enough from home that it could easily go extended periods between a problem being reported and me fixing it.

 

Frankly I wish more people took a similar view, it gets tedious to see people rushing to hide caches only then to let them fall into disrepair. Personally I'd like to see restrictions placed on accounts so that if they routinely see their caches archived for non-maintenance they need to demonstrate how they will maintain future caches before being allowed to keep putting them out there.

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I got a good one..

 

Those who find oodles of caches but don't give back by hiding <and maintaining> their own.

 

You just hit my nerve....right on...cachers with 6 or 8 thousand caches and 5 or maybe 17 hides.

They are just like leeches.

 

Ok, so this bothers me...I have just heard about Geocaching. My husband just retired from the Air Force, the kids are grown and on their own. We are have sold our home and bought a 5th wheel which we will be traveling and living in year round. I only have 14 finds under my belt, but we thought this would be a great way to see and learn so much history about our great land. Due to the fact that our home is now on wheels I am unable to doing any hiding of caches and maintain them as required. I have tried to do my part in properly returning the caches in the places they were found, report any damaged caches, and warned future finders of any dangers, such as wasp, spiders, etc. I want to continue on my searches with a clear mind. I will do what is asked of me to keep my name in good standings within the Geocaching community. My question is how do I explain my situation so that I am compared to "leeches"?

 

There's absolutely no obligation to hide caches. I can't imagine what sort of awful person would call you a "leech," but they are beneath your concern. Keep caching responsibly, and have fun!

Link to comment

I got a good one..

 

Those who find oodles of caches but don't give back by hiding <and maintaining> their own.

 

You just hit my nerve....right on...cachers with 6 or 8 thousand caches and 5 or maybe 17 hides.

They are just like leeches.

 

Ok, so this bothers me...I have just heard about Geocaching. My husband just retired from the Air Force, the kids are grown and on their own. We are have sold our home and bought a 5th wheel which we will be traveling and living in year round. I only have 14 finds under my belt, but we thought this would be a great way to see and learn so much history about our great land. Due to the fact that our home is now on wheels I am unable to doing any hiding of caches and maintain them as required. I have tried to do my part in properly returning the caches in the places they were found, report any damaged caches, and warned future finders of any dangers, such as wasp, spiders, etc. I want to continue on my searches with a clear mind. I will do what is asked of me to keep my name in good standings within the Geocaching community. My question is how do I explain my situation so that I am compared to "leeches"?

I wouldn't worry about it too much. I think that people who have that opinion are in the minority.

 

Not everyone should have to own caches. You're a good example. There are other ways to give back to the sport - finding caches, writing nice logs, being a responsible cacher, holding events, being friendly and helpful in the forums and in person with other cachers, etc.

 

Sounds like you're doing fine. :-)

Thank you so much for the reply. I am having such a great time, but didn't want to upset anyone. I will cherish your advice and will give back to the sport in everyway possible. Thank you again. You are so very kind.

Link to comment

I got a good one..

 

Those who find oodles of caches but don't give back by hiding <and maintaining> their own.

 

You just hit my nerve....right on...cachers with 6 or 8 thousand caches and 5 or maybe 17 hides.

They are just like leeches.

 

Ok, so this bothers me...I have just heard about Geocaching. My husband just retired from the Air Force, the kids are grown and on their own. We are have sold our home and bought a 5th wheel which we will be traveling and living in year round. I only have 14 finds under my belt, but we thought this would be a great way to see and learn so much history about our great land. Due to the fact that our home is now on wheels I am unable to doing any hiding of caches and maintain them as required. I have tried to do my part in properly returning the caches in the places they were found, report any damaged caches, and warned future finders of any dangers, such as wasp, spiders, etc. I want to continue on my searches with a clear mind. I will do what is asked of me to keep my name in good standings within the Geocaching community. My question is how do I explain my situation so that I am compared to "leeches"?

 

Groundspeak, the owners of Geocaching.com has have made it more then clear that it it is NOT necessary to hide caches in order to find them. This is because of situations such as yours as well as many others.

 

I find myself envious of you. My answer to the the age old question, "if you suddenly found yourself a millionaire", would be to buy myself a custom motor home and visit every corner of this country.

Thank you so much for clearing this up for me. My husband and I have been planning this long term road trip for almost 20 years. He is a huge baseball fan and we will be traveling to all of the major league fields to see a game at each starting in Miami. I will continue on with my searches and do my part to help the owners with any maintenance needed. Thank you again. Everyone is so nice here.

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I got a good one..

 

Those who find oodles of caches but don't give back by hiding <and maintaining> their own.

 

You just hit my nerve....right on...cachers with 6 or 8 thousand caches and 5 or maybe 17 hides.

They are just like leeches.

 

Ok, so this bothers me...I have just heard about Geocaching. My husband just retired from the Air Force, the kids are grown and on their own. We are have sold our home and bought a 5th wheel which we will be traveling and living in year round. I only have 14 finds under my belt, but we thought this would be a great way to see and learn so much history about our great land. Due to the fact that our home is now on wheels I am unable to doing any hiding of caches and maintain them as required. I have tried to do my part in properly returning the caches in the places they were found, report any damaged caches, and warned future finders of any dangers, such as wasp, spiders, etc. I want to continue on my searches with a clear mind. I will do what is asked of me to keep my name in good standings within the Geocaching community. My question is how do I explain my situation so that I am compared to "leeches"?

 

It's easy. Just ignore the people who say that you're a leech.

 

I've got 2200 finds and the only hide to date was an event back in 2005. I've often thought about placing a cache or two but I'd rather not hide one unless I'm in a position to keep it maintained. The areas that would be easiest for me to get to are mostly saturated, and I'd rather not place a cache than place one far enough from home that it could easily go extended periods between a problem being reported and me fixing it.

 

Frankly I wish more people took a similar view, it gets tedious to see people rushing to hide caches only then to let them fall into disrepair. Personally I'd like to see restrictions placed on accounts so that if they routinely see their caches archived for non-maintenance they need to demonstrate how they will maintain future caches before being allowed to keep putting them out there.

Hi! Thank you for the reply. I have so much to learn about the rules that this topic caught my eye as to what not to do. When I say this post from 2013 I panicked. I also thought that Leech was a slang word used among geocachers. I really did think about hiding a caches but thought it would be even more irresponsible of me because I would not know when I would be back in that part of the country.

Your numbers are amazing, and make me feel so much better about continuing on. Thank you again for your time!

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I got a good one..

 

Those who find oodles of caches but don't give back by hiding <and maintaining> their own.

 

You just hit my nerve....right on...cachers with 6 or 8 thousand caches and 5 or maybe 17 hides.

They are just like leeches.

 

Ok, so this bothers me...I have just heard about Geocaching. My husband just retired from the Air Force, the kids are grown and on their own. We are have sold our home and bought a 5th wheel which we will be traveling and living in year round. I only have 14 finds under my belt, but we thought this would be a great way to see and learn so much history about our great land. Due to the fact that our home is now on wheels I am unable to doing any hiding of caches and maintain them as required. I have tried to do my part in properly returning the caches in the places they were found, report any damaged caches, and warned future finders of any dangers, such as wasp, spiders, etc. I want to continue on my searches with a clear mind. I will do what is asked of me to keep my name in good standings within the Geocaching community. My question is how do I explain my situation so that I am compared to "leeches"?

 

There's absolutely no obligation to hide caches. I can't imagine what sort of awful person would call you a "leech," but they are beneath your concern. Keep caching responsibly, and have fun!

Hello, I must clear up that I was not personally called a "leech". I am trying to learn all I can about the sport and this came across this topic and post from 2013. I thought that leech was used often to describe someone who finds but does not hide. I appreciate your reply and hope to talk to you all soon. Best of luck!

Link to comment

I got a good one..

 

Those who find oodles of caches but don't give back by hiding <and maintaining> their own.

 

You just hit my nerve....right on...cachers with 6 or 8 thousand caches and 5 or maybe 17 hides.

They are just like leeches.

 

Ok, so this bothers me...I have just heard about Geocaching. My husband just retired from the Air Force, the kids are grown and on their own. We are have sold our home and bought a 5th wheel which we will be traveling and living in year round. I only have 14 finds under my belt, but we thought this would be a great way to see and learn so much history about our great land. Due to the fact that our home is now on wheels I am unable to doing any hiding of caches and maintain them as required. I have tried to do my part in properly returning the caches in the places they were found, report any damaged caches, and warned future finders of any dangers, such as wasp, spiders, etc. I want to continue on my searches with a clear mind. I will do what is asked of me to keep my name in good standings within the Geocaching community. My question is how do I explain my situation so that I am compared to "leeches"?

 

There's absolutely no obligation to hide caches. I can't imagine what sort of awful person would call you a "leech," but they are beneath your concern. Keep caching responsibly, and have fun!

Hello, I must clear up that I was not personally called a "leech". I am trying to learn all I can about the sport and this came across this topic and post from 2013. I thought that leech was used often to describe someone who finds but does not hide. I appreciate your reply and hope to talk to you all soon. Best of luck!

 

Yes, people make judgement calls based on limited or incomplete information. This is a defect on their part, not yours. You do not need to hide anything at all, nor should you feel obligated. Hiding a cache should be because you have a burst of inspiration, not out of guilt. Don't worry about it at all. Some of these people have over 170 hides or so, which might be considered a sickness.. :D

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I thought that leech was used often to describe someone who finds but does not hide.

 

I think it's a little more complicated than that. Obviously, your situation is very special. I am sure there are people out there who write good logs and fix up caches as they go, but don't hide their own. People who write 'tftc' or don't log at all, don't bother rehiding caches well and don't hide any of their own, these people I would consider leeches.

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I got a good one..

 

Those who find oodles of caches but don't give back by hiding <and maintaining> their own.

 

You just hit my nerve....right on...cachers with 6 or 8 thousand caches and 5 or maybe 17 hides.

They are just like leeches.

 

Ok, so this bothers me...I have just heard about Geocaching. My husband just retired from the Air Force, the kids are grown and on their own. We are have sold our home and bought a 5th wheel which we will be traveling and living in year round. I only have 14 finds under my belt, but we thought this would be a great way to see and learn so much history about our great land. Due to the fact that our home is now on wheels I am unable to doing any hiding of caches and maintain them as required. I have tried to do my part in properly returning the caches in the places they were found, report any damaged caches, and warned future finders of any dangers, such as wasp, spiders, etc. I want to continue on my searches with a clear mind. I will do what is asked of me to keep my name in good standings within the Geocaching community. My question is how do I explain my situation so that I am compared to "leeches"?

I wouldn't worry about it too much. I think that people who have that opinion are in the minority.

 

Not everyone should have to own caches. You're a good example. There are other ways to give back to the sport - finding caches, writing nice logs, being a responsible cacher, holding events, being friendly and helpful in the forums and in person with other cachers, etc.

 

Sounds like you're doing fine. :-)

Thank you so much for the reply. I am having such a great time, but didn't want to upset anyone. I will cherish your advice and will give back to the sport in everyway possible. Thank you again. You are so very kind.

Once you've traveled somewhere, is that it? Do you never return there? If there are places you return to, even occasionally, you could hide a cache there, as long as you can show that you're able to maintain it. Of course, there is no obligation to hide caches, either. If you feel like you couldn't adequately hide and maintain a cache, you're doing the right thing by not hiding one. Many hiders could learn a lot from you.

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