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jaaake

Owner deletes my log without a response. What do I do?

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I would disagree that logging an archived cache, in itself, is bad form. If you found it, then why not log it? A few in the forums will find fault with it (as with anything that doesn't fit some preconcieved notion), but it not bad form.

 

So... exactly what does it mean for a cache to be archived? In it's purest sense, an archiving a cache listing means is not available for search results. The only way it can be viewed is by direct link/view. Not much more than that. It does not mean the cache container was removed. It doesn't mean you can't find it.

 

It 'might' mean that the cache owner decided to stop maintaining it. But not always.

It 'might' mean that someone put it in a 'better spot'. But not always.

It 'might' mean it was removed by property managers. But not always.

It 'might' mean it is no longer in place. But not always.

 

The only rule for geocaching has been "find the cache, sign the logbook, share your experience online". There are no qualifiers as to archived or enabled. There are guideleines to cover the details, and guidelines have flexibility (even if it's minimal).

 

So what you are saying, unless I am reading this wrong, is that once a cache is placed then the area is active and this can't be revoked.

 

Then what should be done in situations where I have the permission of a landowner but then the landowner suddenly changes his mind and doesn't want anyone geocaching on his land anymore. Or I start seeing geotrails or excessive bushwhacking and I want the area to recover. Or the area that the cache is in is sold and a developer puts a building sight right where my cache was.

 

If disabling a cache and in particular archiving a cache isn't a sign that the cache owner doesn't want the cache to be looked for then what is?

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......

4. Stay away from them they're trouble. (cache and the cacher) :D

I hope the smiley indicates you are just kidding. I don't see where anybody can automatically always conclude that a cache owner that deletes a find log on an archived cache is "trouble".

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So what you are saying, unless I am reading this wrong, is that once a cache is placed then the area is active and this can't be revoked.

 

Then what should be done in situations where I have the permission of a landowner but then the landowner suddenly changes his mind and doesn't want anyone geocaching on his land anymore. Or I start seeing geotrails or excessive bushwhacking and I want the area to recover. Or the area that the cache is in is sold and a developer puts a building sight right where my cache was.

 

If disabling a cache and in particular archiving a cache isn't a sign that the cache owner doesn't want the cache to be looked for then what is?

 

I think the two of you could agree to this logic:

 

Two very different archive logs--

1. Archiving this cache, new land owner put up no trespassing signs.

2. Archiving this cache, I'm no longer in the area to maintain it.

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......

4. Stay away from them they're trouble. (cache and the cacher) :D

I hope the smiley indicates you are just kidding. I don't see where anybody can automatically always conclude that a cache owner that deletes a find log on an archived cache is "trouble".

 

I meant the cacher searching for archived caches (myself) not the owner.

*edit* and yes it was a joke.

Edited by jaaake

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So what you are saying, unless I am reading this wrong, is that once a cache is placed then the area is active and this can't be revoked.

 

Then what should be done in situations where I have the permission of a landowner but then the landowner suddenly changes his mind and doesn't want anyone geocaching on his land anymore. Or I start seeing geotrails or excessive bushwhacking and I want the area to recover. Or the area that the cache is in is sold and a developer puts a building sight right where my cache was.

 

If disabling a cache and in particular archiving a cache isn't a sign that the cache owner doesn't want the cache to be looked for then what is?

 

I think the two of you could agree to this logic:

 

Two very different archive logs--

1. Archiving this cache, new land owner put up no trespassing signs.

2. Archiving this cache, I'm no longer in the area to maintain it.

huh??

 

1. Means to me - don't go there.

2. Means to me - I don't want anybody going there anymore as I can no longer look after it. (could possibly mean cache is there or not there). Area is now open for a new cacher to place a new cache for finders.

 

Either way - I see it as communicating that the cache is "closed"

 

What was it that I needed to agree to??

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Then what should be done in situations where I have the permission of a landowner but then the landowner suddenly changes his mind and doesn't want anyone geocaching on his land anymore. Or I start seeing geotrails or excessive bushwhacking and I want the area to recover. Or the area that the cache is in is sold and a developer puts a building sight right where my cache was.

 

If disabling a cache and in particular archiving a cache isn't a sign that the cache owner doesn't want the cache to be looked for then what is?

Simple suggestion: Do your duty as a cache owner and remove the cache container, and in your Archive log let it be known that there is no cache container to be found. Also, indicate in your Archive log the specific reason it was archived for the sake of potential future seekers and potential future hiders.

 

--Larry

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So what you are saying, unless I am reading this wrong, is that once a cache is placed then the area is active and this can't be revoked.

 

Then what should be done in situations where I have the permission of a landowner but then the landowner suddenly changes his mind and doesn't want anyone geocaching on his land anymore. Or I start seeing geotrails or excessive bushwhacking and I want the area to recover. Or the area that the cache is in is sold and a developer puts a building sight right where my cache was.

 

If disabling a cache and in particular archiving a cache isn't a sign that the cache owner doesn't want the cache to be looked for then what is?

 

You are reading this wrong. Every situation is different. Archiving a cache could indicate a number of different things. If it still has legal access and is not disturbing an archeological area, or plant and animal life, it should be okay. Read the logs to glean the best answer, or better yet ask the CO.

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Simple suggestion: Do your duty as a cache owner and remove the cache container, and in your Archive log let it be known that there is no cache container to be found. Also, indicate in your Archive log the specific reason it was archived for the sake of potential future seekers and potential future hiders.

 

--Larry

 

I believe that the cache owner referenced in the first post of this topic is doing his duty as a cache owner.

 

This is just a small sample of some his archive logs.

  • Not interested in the upkeep of caches so will be removing them.
  • Time for this one to go.
  • This cache has been destroyed. Since another cacher has put a cache at this rest stop I won't be replacing this cache.
  • This cache has become a bother to the grounds keeper and he has asked that it be removed.
  • The college and UP have asked for this cache to be removed. Cachers have abused the locomotive and the area and they do not want a cache in this area.
  • This cache has been destroyed. Thanks to all who found this cache.
  • The flooding in the area has messed this area up. Time for this one to go.

 

They are all very clear to me.

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This is a great example of an archived cache:

 

Archive 03/28/2007

I am VERY very sad to report that this cache is gone. The tree is gone. The pit is gone. The area has changed much over the winter. Apparently the city decided to "thin" out the trees in Riverside park and to cut down and destroy all of the Russian Olive trees. I am told that the project is still underway and will move to the west along the YMCA camp and pathway to the end. Several other caches in the area may be in danger. This was my very first cache find and I was honored to take it as my own a bit over 2 years ago. I am very emotionally attached to this area but no real hope of hiding a regular sized cache anywhere within 50 feet of where this was. Hopefully the city office has the ammocan and I can get it back. Maybe I can find a hide spot not too far away to place a replacement but this hide and box are gone for good.

 

Goodbye old friend and goodbye to the oldest cache in the Nebraska Panhandle. sniff.......

 

This is not:

 

Archive 04/11/2010

Archived.

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Simple suggestion: Do your duty as a cache owner and remove the cache container, and in your Archive log let it be known that there is no cache container to be found. Also, indicate in your Archive log the specific reason it was archived for the sake of potential future seekers and potential future hiders.

 

--Larry

 

I believe that the cache owner referenced in the first post of this topic is doing his duty as a cache owner.

 

This is just a small sample of some his archive logs.

  • Not interested in the upkeep of caches so will be removing them.
  • Time for this one to go.
  • This cache has been destroyed. Since another cacher has put a cache at this rest stop I won't be replacing this cache.
  • This cache has become a bother to the grounds keeper and he has asked that it be removed.
  • The college and UP have asked for this cache to be removed. Cachers have abused the locomotive and the area and they do not want a cache in this area.
  • This cache has been destroyed. Thanks to all who found this cache.
  • The flooding in the area has messed this area up. Time for this one to go.

 

They are all very clear to me.

The first post in this thread describes the OP as finding a cache container and signing the log. That's what started this whole discussion. At least in that case, the cache owner obviously didn't remove the cache container.

 

--Larry

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http://coord.info/GL7NGM41

I've been interested in helping clean up archived caches the owners failed to remove themselves.

 

I simply logged:

El Fin. Signed log, removed container. Please contact me if you want it, or I'll just re-purpose it. TFTC!

 

The owner:

Big Dawgg & Cardinal Girl

http://www.geocaching.com/profile/?guid=0a598df2-9928-4f9a-ab91-3d0944fe150f&wid=33f51ab8-4cf3-4c51-b9c2-2a1f54a30b6f&ds=2

 

Deleted my log. I sent him an email asking why, no response so I re-posted the same log.

He deleted it again. I send him an additional message asking for clarification--no response.

I logged it a 3rd time. He deleted it and got it locked.

 

(Completely my opinion here)

It messes up my list of finds, I like logging archived caches and I really just want people to remove their caches if they archive them. I feel like if I take the time to hunt down archived caches, if I sign the log and offer to return the container I should be allowed to count them as found.

 

Thoughts? :unsure:

-JAAAKE

 

I feel that if the cache is archived, and you know that when you go after it, then a deleted log is the risk you take on it, and you should accept that.

 

SS

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The first post in this thread describes the OP as finding a cache container and signing the log. That's what started this whole discussion. At least in that case, the cache owner obviously didn't remove the cache container.

 

--Larry

Since we can't see the deleted log I can't tell what specific cache is being talked about. If you look at his archived caches a large number of them have this note "Not interested in the upkeep of caches so will be removing them." That looks like, to me at least, this cache owner is downsizing the number of caches he has and is getting around to pickup up the containers. Last time I checked there isn't a mandatory time frame that archived caches must be removed by.

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So what you are saying, unless I am reading this wrong, is that once a cache is placed then the area is active and this can't be revoked.

 

Then what should be done in situations where I have the permission of a landowner but then the landowner suddenly changes his mind and doesn't want anyone geocaching on his land anymore. Or I start seeing geotrails or excessive bushwhacking and I want the area to recover. Or the area that the cache is in is sold and a developer puts a building sight right where my cache was.

 

If disabling a cache and in particular archiving a cache isn't a sign that the cache owner doesn't want the cache to be looked for then what is?

 

You are reading this wrong. Every situation is different. Archiving a cache could indicate a number of different things. If it still has legal access and is not disturbing an archeological area, or plant and animal life, it should be okay. Read the logs to glean the best answer, or better yet ask the CO.

 

That's what I have been saying. Just not in those words.

 

It takes a little time and skill to determine whether a cache is just archived or truly abandoned but one indicator of an abandoned cache is that a reviewer instead of the cache owner was the one to make the archive log, aka a forced archive.

If you are not going to seek permission first then you need to be willing to accept that some cache owners will not be happy with your actions.

 

What I was referring to in that post is the side discussion that started from this post by Moose Mob.

 

So... exactly what does it mean for a cache to be archived? In it's purest sense, an archiving a cache listing means is not available for search results. The only way it can be viewed is by direct link/view. Not much more than that. It does not mean the cache container was removed. It doesn't mean you can't find it.

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This is a great example of an archived cache:

 

Archive 03/28/2007

I am VERY very sad to report that this cache is gone. The tree is gone. The pit is gone. The area has changed much over the winter. Apparently the city decided to "thin" out the trees in Riverside park and to cut down and destroy all of the Russian Olive trees. I am told that the project is still underway and will move to the west along the YMCA camp and pathway to the end. Several other caches in the area may be in danger. This was my very first cache find and I was honored to take it as my own a bit over 2 years ago. I am very emotionally attached to this area but no real hope of hiding a regular sized cache anywhere within 50 feet of where this was. Hopefully the city office has the ammocan and I can get it back. Maybe I can find a hide spot not too far away to place a replacement but this hide and box are gone for good.

 

Goodbye old friend and goodbye to the oldest cache in the Nebraska Panhandle. sniff.......

 

This is not:

 

Archive 04/11/2010

Archived.

 

The 2007 example is a very good archive log. But there is no requirement for archive logs to be detailed.

The 2010 example is minimalist but acceptable. Until I could get a response from the CO I would assume the risk of deletion for any log entry that I made.

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I've had fun finding archived caches, that being said, I wouldn't log them as found. The only way I would, is when I found the cache while active and they archived it before I logged, and I was online logging within a few days of finding the cache. I think leaving geotrash is wrong as well, but that is a separate issue and these days can get complicated. It is much more likely to be moved and the owner couldn't find it, or was gone/removed and a throwdown was placed than it being listed at another site. There is not shortage of geolitter, it has always happened, just at a higher rate now as a product of more cachers and easier/cheaper ways to geocache.

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The first post in this thread describes the OP as finding a cache container and signing the log. That's what started this whole discussion. At least in that case, the cache owner obviously didn't remove the cache container.

 

--Larry

Since we can't see the deleted log I can't tell what specific cache is being talked about. If you look at his archived caches a large number of them have this note "Not interested in the upkeep of caches so will be removing them." That looks like, to me at least, this cache owner is downsizing the number of caches he has and is getting around to pickup up the containers. Last time I checked there isn't a mandatory time frame that archived caches must be removed by.

My one and only point (and the only point I really care about) is that if a cache owner needs to make sure that his archived cache is no longer visited (most often due to permission/trespassing issues), the only thing the cache owner can do to make sure no one can find the cache and sign the log is to physically remove the cache and make that obvious on the cache page. As long as the cache owner hasn't fulfilled that obligation and complied with that guideline, there will continue to be an ongoing risk of further difficulty caused by that cache.

 

If there's a strong reason to keep cachers from attempting to find the cache, there's no excuse for the cache owner not to remove the physical container as soon as possible. On the other hand, if the cache owner archived the cache simply because he's walking away from the hobby, or moved away from the area, or whatever, and the cache placement isn't otherwise problematical, I guess those who enjoy chasing archived caches can find them and log them. Happily, there are still plenty of decent active caches in my area that I haven't found yet, so It's not a specialty I'm likely to get involved with.

 

Personally, I'm hoping every cache owner will be responsible and remove the cache container whenever he archives a cache. As others have pointed out, I can just imagine the confusion that could be caused by an active cache being hidden in the same spot (or near) an archived cache that was never properly disposed of.

 

--Larry

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The first post in this thread describes the OP as finding a cache container and signing the log. That's what started this whole discussion. At least in that case, the cache owner obviously didn't remove the cache container.

 

--Larry

Since we can't see the deleted log I can't tell what specific cache is being talked about. If you look at his archived caches a large number of them have this note "Not interested in the upkeep of caches so will be removing them." That looks like, to me at least, this cache owner is downsizing the number of caches he has and is getting around to pickup up the containers. Last time I checked there isn't a mandatory time frame that archived caches must be removed by.

My one and only point (and the only point I really care about) is that if a cache owner needs to make sure that his archived cache is no longer visited (most often due to permission/trespassing issues), the only thing the cache owner can do to make sure no one can find the cache and sign the log is to physically remove the cache and make that obvious on the cache page. As long as the cache owner hasn't fulfilled that obligation and complied with that guideline, there will continue to be an ongoing risk of further difficulty caused by that cache.

 

If there's a strong reason to keep cachers from attempting to find the cache, there's no excuse for the cache owner not to remove the physical container as soon as possible. On the other hand, if the cache owner archived the cache simply because he's walking away from the hobby, or moved away from the area, or whatever, and the cache placement isn't otherwise problematical, I guess those who enjoy chasing archived caches can find them and log them. Happily, there are still plenty of decent active caches in my area that I haven't found yet, so It's not a specialty I'm likely to get involved with.

 

Personally, I'm hoping every cache owner will be responsible and remove the cache container whenever he archives a cache. As others have pointed out, I can just imagine the confusion that could be caused by an active cache being hidden in the same spot (or near) an archived cache that was never properly disposed of.

 

--Larry

 

In my mind, this is clearly the issue here. If you don't want your archived cache found for whatever reason, pick it up. If you leave it, you have no bearing on which to complain when people log it. Seems pretty clear cut to me.

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Seems pretty clear to me that if it is archived, then it is archived and should not be logged.

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Seems pretty clear to me that if it is archived, then it is archived and should not be logged.

Me too. But clearly that is not an official stance. I've learned that in this thread.

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So I should quit my attempt to find 100 archived caches? :(

 

Yes.

 

Sure why not.. you've said in another post that you are counting caches that get archived after you find them so it will happen without going after currently archived ones. I just checked, and my 100th archived find was my 156th overall find. Time is your friend. Relax and enjoy.

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In my mind, this is clearly the issue here. If you don't want your archived cache found for whatever reason, pick it up. If you leave it, you have no bearing on which to complain when people log it. Seems pretty clear cut to me.

 

Well, we have seen examples of throwdowns on archived caches...

I have only logged one archived cache. It was archived between the time I loaded it into my GPS, and when I arrived in Maine a week later. Cache was still there (and is probably still there...) But I have done a few TravelBug rescue missions. (That was when archived caches still showed on the maps.) Of the six I looked for, two were multis with the first stage missing, but I knew where the finals were. And still there. One the container was strewn about, and the bug missing. One had the bug picked up six months earlier, but not logged out. Container still there. The other two, the CO left the game. Containers still there.

If one wishes to have an archived cache locked, perhaps e-mailig the reviewer would work? Good for cases where the cache should not have been there, or permission has been denied, or geocachers are leaving too much of a trace?

"Hey, Reviewer. I'm too lazy to retrieve the geotrash I left in the woods. Can you lock it for me?" That sounds like OP's problem. CO was too lazy to retrieve the geotrash, and deletes logs to try to hide that.

I do object to COs who archive caches, but leave them to be logged with proximity problems. GS should lock those!

But, if the cache is still there, then it should be loggable. Not that I'd go hunting an archived caches, except for TB rescue.

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Simple suggestion: Do your duty as a cache owner and remove the cache container, and in your Archive log let it be known that there is no cache container to be found. Also, indicate in your Archive log the specific reason it was archived for the sake of potential future seekers and potential future hiders.

 

--Larry

DING DING DING! That is the correct answer!

 

When I have archived a cache I always post a note stating approx. when I would get out to retrieve the container and then post another note when I have removed it. Many times I have had locals who were watching the cache run out to grab the cache before it was gone. Remove the container and there will be nothing to search for.

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Simple suggestion: Do your duty as a cache owner and remove the cache container, and in your Archive log let it be known that there is no cache container to be found. Also, indicate in your Archive log the specific reason it was archived for the sake of potential future seekers and potential future hiders.

 

--Larry

DING DING DING! That is the correct answer!

 

When I have archived a cache I always post a note stating approx. when I would get out to retrieve the container and then post another note when I have removed it. Many times I have had locals who were watching the cache run out to grab the cache before it was gone. Remove the container and there will be nothing to search for.

 

Exactly.. archiving a cache and leaving it in the woods to be found is far worse than looking for an archived cache that is still there to be found. Had the CO done his job and removed the cache there would be no reason to discuss the validity of the found logs.

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But it does seem that a lot of cache owners have a zero maintenance policy. That they put caches out and then once a few people have DNF'd it they archive.

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But it does seem that a lot of cache owners have a zero maintenance policy. That they put caches out and then once a few people have DNF'd it they archive.

 

Depends on your area, IMO.

I have 36 Hides and I've replaced 9 of them at least once.

I do have 1 archived because I wanted to make it a puzzle cache instead of traditional.

12 Easy Steps to Success

My wife was a little upset when I cut a 2'X2' hole in the side of the garage to make a cache. :blink:

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[My wife was a little upset when I cut a 2'X2' hole in the side of the garage to make a cache. :blink:

 

You should know that getting permission first is listed in the guidelines and repeated many times in the forums for a reason. <_<

 

 

:D

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[My wife was a little upset when I cut a 2'X2' hole in the side of the garage to make a cache. :blink:

 

You should know that getting permission first is listed in the guidelines and repeated many times in the forums for a reason. dry.gif

 

 

:D

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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But it does seem that a lot of cache owners have a zero maintenance policy. That they put caches out and then once a few people have DNF'd it they archive.

I have that type of maintenance plan for a couple hundered of the caches I own. They are remote desert geocaches that are ammo cans or aluminum containers that are are seen every year or two. I will not use plastic as even the best tupperware will degrade in a few years. So far, less than 1% of them have needed to be archived.

 

The ones that get more frequent visits do get maintained.

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(Completely my opinion here)

It messes up my list of finds, I like logging archived caches and I really just want people to remove their caches if they archive them. I feel like if I take the time to hunt down archived caches, if I sign the log and offer to return the container I should be allowed to count them as found.

 

Thoughts? :unsure:

-JAAAKE

 

Logging an archived cache is considered bad form.

 

That would be news to me.

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Some owners actually leave archived caches in place and hide a new one nearby so that the finders can get 2 smileys. Every situation is different.

Ah... you mean, they do it to circumvent the proximity guidelines? FAIL!

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I simply logged:

El Fin. Signed log, removed container. Please contact me if you want it, or I'll just re-purpose it. TFTC!

 

If (and that is a big "IF") your second log contained the same or similar wording, that might be why the deletions. The cache owner already had the information from your first log and you didn't need to repeat it. Doesn't make him right to delete your log... but that may have been his reasoning.

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Logging an archived cache is considered bad form.

There was an archived mystery cache in Seattle that was logged by hundreds (thousands?) of cachers. It was the cache to log for many. The owners and the cachers that logged this cache did not consider it bad form. If you wonder which one, it is GCK25B.

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Logging an archived cache is considered bad form.

There was an archived mystery cache in Seattle that was logged by hundreds (thousands?) of cachers. It was the cache to log for many. The owners and the cachers that logged this cache did not consider it bad form. If you wonder which one, it is GCK25B.

And I do believed that I have grumbled about that one too, in the past. I've driven past there many times (both the old and new location) and never stopped in to log it. Thanks for letting me know that it is no longer archived. I should pay the lily pad a visit.

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(Completely my opinion here)

It messes up my list of finds, I like logging archived caches and I really just want people to remove their caches if they archive them. I feel like if I take the time to hunt down archived caches, if I sign the log and offer to return the container I should be allowed to count them as found.

 

Thoughts? :unsure:

-JAAAKE

 

Logging an archived cache is considered bad form.

 

That would be news to me.

 

Sorry, I'm one of those out-of-dated cachers. Archiving a cache listing used to mean that the cache owner removed the cache or verified that the cache was no longer there and that they didn't intend to replace it. Now a days I see that archiving a cache is used to circumvent the minimum distance guideline. I've also learned that the play it your way mantra has really grown and logging found logs when you clearly haven't found the cache has become popular. I can understand why. It's a pain having to actually find all those containers and sign all those logs or worry if the cache is archived or not. I've even learned that you can Geocaching in an airplane now.

 

No worries. This old cacher is quickly getting up to speed on how the game is currently being played.

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A local cache was archived by the reviewer when they were informed by a cacher that it was on private farmland. Another cacher, unaware it was archived, already had it in his GPS, found it and logged online. This cache was on my watchlist, and I got the notification. We have a multi in the area, both parts on the public trail, (this cache wasn't) so I asked the reviewer if he/she wanted me to pick up the archived cache. I was told it was the property of the cache owner and they were to deal with it. If there was no reply to the reviewer's email to them, then I would be asked to remove what was now geo-litter.

I don't go looking for archived caches as I assume most are removed. I know some aren't though....work with your reviewer with those archived caches and let them deal with the CO.

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Logging an archived cache is considered bad form.

 

Leaving an archived cache in place as litter is bad form.

 

Logging it simply means that you found it. Nothing more nothing less.

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lol. If I find you in the woods, I'll sign you and log you found.

Seems some of you might be lost/archived :)

 

Don't know about signing the person in the woods, but SAR does lead to lots of paperwork in most cases.

 

I do think the person would gladly be signed, especially things like casts, as long as they survive and get the heck out of there in one piece!

 

Edit: Now that I've read the whole topic... I will say that I don't often get to look for archived caches, but I do like to go out once in a while to find disabled ones... usually those with high DNF rates, mostly to see if it was the cache or the cacher. Mostly I do this for ones that are in the area I'm geocaching in anyway. I've ended up maintaining a few that way, for the CO with permission. Those were local 'classics', but some were just plain being missed by people due to local condition changes, rehiding harder than the ratings, and so forth. That is the best time to do so IMHO, when you can still 'save' a cache and contents. That said some I did last fall have now been archived since the owner simply wants to re use the site in question. Sadly one or two I had puzzle solutions for, but now will not get to find. Hopefully they will be replaced with new puzzles for me to solve. And I hope that the containers were or will be picked up.

 

 

Doug 7rxc

Edited by 7rxc

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I recently found a cache - was even the FTF (see story at http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?guid=dd16004c-b516-4d1e-872a-aa74954834f6)

 

Sadly the cache never got published (presumably due to vaction guideline) - I found it, I signed the logbook - it had an offical cache label on it - tell me where I go to log my "find"?? I followed all the rules you cite.

 

Seems under your statement that anybody could do a throw down type cache (or even 'claim' they found a cache's remains) at an archived location and start logging. When I archive a cache - it is intended to mean "stop". This cache listing is over. Its what I always have understood since you can't delete them.

 

Maybe its just me though.......guess I was wrong.

 

Having said that - I still strongly believe that all geotrash needs picked up promptly.

 

I've had a similar story about 3 years ago. No info in cache container, just empty log book. I also posted it here, and I kept up with the cache. After three years of just me in the log book, one of the locals basically said "You have a free cache container." So after 3 years, I picked it up.

 

As for the op topic, I came across an owner who archived all of his caches (maybe 100 in that area). In this case, I sent him a message, and he said that he was pretty much done with geocaching (the local organization upset him, so he archived all of his geocaches to get the club to change or something). He said that they are all still out there, and if you find them, you can log them. It's really up to the owner.

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Logging an archived cache is considered bad form.

 

Leaving an archived cache in place as litter is bad form.

 

Logging it simply means that you found it. Nothing more nothing less.

 

Finally, a response that I can agree with 100%. Clear, simple and straight-forward. No ifs, ands, or buts.

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