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When is a noob no longer a noob?


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This question has been burning a hole in my brain for a while. I really am curious, and do not want to spark too much mudslinging... but I want to know.

 

When is a cacher no longer considered a noob? How long and how many cache finds? How many types of cache finds, events, difficult/terrain, etc?

 

Would someone who has been a member for 10 years but has less than 50 cache finds be considered a noob?

 

Would someone who has been caching for 5 months with 1000 park and grab finds be considered a noob?

 

Please let me know your opinions.

 

I guess the reason I want to know honestly, is whether or not we (my husband and I) still fit into the noob category. We have a lot of very prolific cachers in our area, and I feel fairly inadequate and inexperienced compared to them, but with four years and 963 caches under our belt, maybe I'm just being silly... or maybe I'll always feel like a noob, and that's okay. I always say if I ever stop learning I might as well just die.

 

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

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As far as being a newbie or not being a newbie in the inexperienced sense: there was a recent debate in another thread on these forums how many caches you need to visit before you are qualified to post a cache of your own. The general conclusion was there was no real number that could reasonable qualify due to issues like power trails and variance in caches.

 

Really newbie-ness is probably best quantified by how sharp your geosense is and how easily you can find caches. I don't imagine someone who has been caching for years and has hundreds of finds is likely to be a newbie. If you know some people who have several thousand finds they make you feel like a novice by comparison, but really there's no need to worry. Learn from your finds for future searches, have fun, and don't worry if other people out there can find a cache faster.

 

P.S. I don't know how geocaching treats the concept of a "noob" but where I come from in gaming there are two different things: "newb" as in newbie and "noob" as in "n00b". A newb/newbie is someone who is new at what they are doing and just inexperienced. A noob/n00b is someone who has been doing the thing for awhile and thinks they are knowlegeable/skilled, but are in fact not competant at what they are doing. And're you're definitely not a n00b in that sense: a n00b wouldn't never be self-aware enough to ask. :)

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Anyone with less than 1183 finds is a total n00b !

 

4wheelin, you are a total n00b. :)

 

I have 200 finds and a bunch of good hides. I have only been geocaching for about a year. I don't consider myself a n00b.

 

I know there are some of the "many thousand find" cachers that will always consider me a n00b, but as long as I'm happy...who cares.

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Thank you for your answers so far!

 

Personally, I think it all really depends on the person. I'm glad to see that others see it this way as well. And the first person who responded is right, it is really all about attitude.

 

And a little more info... I got told I was a noob last week (not on the forums) when I offered to help someone out when they were learning. And I've been wondering about it ever since.

 

Normally I do have a pretty good attitude. If I have a good experience that's what matters. It really isn't about the numbers.

 

Thanks again folks.

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Shut Up Noob!!!

 

When you can read that and not immediately think it's referring to you. :):yikes::P:):)

 

 

*** This post was meant to be humorous. Results are not guaranteed.

 

AHAHAHA! That was really funny. I needed that. :P Actually, your posts are some of my favorite, we have a similar sense of humor.

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Everyone is still a n00b at some times.

 

- The first time you find (or don't) a new style of hide.

- When out caching with a completely new GPSr (raises hand.)

- When suffering a lapse of intelligence and nearly tripping over the hide you just can't find.

- Out in the field, without the waypoints/GPX you thought you had loaded.

- Searching for a cache at the virtual location, puzzle marker point or multi start, without realizing it.

- At the start of a cache run with one set of batteries and they're almost run down because you forgot to recharge them.

- Tromping all over the place, following your GPSr, without taking a look at your satellite readings, to find how accurate they really are.

- Out in the field without a cache page which contained essential information on finding the cache (i.e. Now go 200 ft west, then 300 ft north and you can't miss the bright orange 5 gallon bucket) Not all caches are exactly where the coords meet, sometimes you gotta read the page!

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You ask a very deep question.

 

Here at the University of BlueBow, we have put together a comprehensive, 3 month course in Noobity: What it is and what it isn't. This is a prerequisite for the companion course "Finding your inner noob with a GPS". The course will cover the following topics: "wrong side of the creek", "falling IN the creek", "what to do when the batteries die", "use of the GPS as a flashlight", "nano-log rolling", and the ever popular "dirty fighting tricks for that FTF".

 

If you, and more importantly, your GPS, survive this course, you will receive a diploma certifying that you are no longer a noob. But there is no time to waste - enroll today for the low cost of $169.99, plus sales tax, before this opportunity is gone.

 

Otherwise... you will remain a sad, questioning noob!

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The course will cover the following topics: "wrong side of the creek", "falling IN the creek", "what to do when the batteries die", "use of the GPS as a flashlight", "nano-log rolling", and the ever popular "dirty fighting tricks for that FTF".

 

 

Heh... it took me FOREVER to get proficient at rolling nano logs. My husband is so much better at it than I am, but at least now I can do it. D'oh!

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The course will cover the following topics: "wrong side of the creek", "falling IN the creek", "what to do when the batteries die", "use of the GPS as a flashlight", "nano-log rolling", and the ever popular "dirty fighting tricks for that FTF".

 

 

Heh... it took me FOREVER to get proficient at rolling nano logs. My husband is so much better at it than I am, but at least now I can do it. D'oh!

 

I astounded a group of veteran cachers with my quick rolling technique for nano logs, particularly blinkies. Very simple, really. They all had buckets of finds, but had always done it the hard way.

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I astounded a group of veteran cachers with my quick rolling technique for nano logs, particularly blinkies. Very simple, really. They all had buckets of finds, but had always done it the hard way.

 

Now I am curious. Its like when I was on a hike and someone showed me the best technique ever for tying shoes. Perhaps you could do a You Tube demonstration or otherwise enlighten us nooobies.

Edited by Erickson
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I astounded a group of veteran cachers with my quick rolling technique for nano logs, particularly blinkies. Very simple, really. They all had buckets of finds, but had always done it the hard way.

 

Now I am curious. Perhaps you could do a You Tube demonstration or otherwise enlighten us nooobies.

 

I'll have to find my mortar board and a suitable gown, first.

 

Then again, perhaps I'll just do an Instructable.

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When is a cacher no longer considered a noob? How long and how many cache finds? How many types of cache finds, events, difficult/terrain, etc?

If you ask me: There is no number.

 

You have the person who speaks English well, reads a lot and is informed, asks for advice and is eager to learn. This person won't be a noob at all.

 

On the other hand you have the stubborn type who knows everything from the beginning, doesn't speak English at all or not very well but starts hiding geocaches soon.

 

No, I don't think you can figure out a number of finds or a period of time, it just depends on the individual person.

 

GermanSailor

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I astounded a group of veteran cachers with my quick rolling technique for nano logs, particularly blinkies. Very simple, really. They all had buckets of finds, but had always done it the hard way.

 

Now I am curious. Perhaps you could do a You Tube demonstration or otherwise enlighten us nooobies.

 

I'll have to find my mortar board and a suitable gown, first.

 

Then again, perhaps I'll just do an Instructable.

 

I haven't sent them yet. Still waiting for your final payment...

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I think it's not just about the number of caches one has found or the duration of one's membership.

In my opinion, the more different caches of different types one has found, the more expirience one has. For example, even if one has 1000 caches but just 1/1 rated, then one hasn't as much experience as one who has 1000 caches from 1/1 to 5/5, multis, mysterys, traditionals, night caches and so on.

But it's still a thing of your own mind :anicute:

 

Mezgrman

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Honestly, I've always thoroughly disliked the term noob. It just has such a negative sound. As was mentioned above, we all have different ideas about the game in general. Bittsen loves rock pile hides. I love bus stop nanos. Everyone's idea of proficient will be different, even if only a little bit. Individual circumstances make a difference too. My kids prevent me from caching as often as I would like, and limit which caches I can chase, but they also make the caches we can do a whole new experience.

 

I've never fallen a creek, however I have ended up at the bottom of a hill on my butt with rocks in my pants on several occasions, does the noobity class cover that aspect?

 

I've actually had people give me dirty looks as I was re-rolling logs, nanos included. I guess when you see someone sitting on a bench in a park rolling a paper with their fingers, there aren't that many things they could be doing.

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I go with the everyone is a newbie in some degree because there is always something new to learn. I don't consider people newbies because they only found 1/1 caches. There are many people who cache who have mobility problems finding more difficult terrain caches is not an option for those people. Should they still be considered newbies based only on the fact that they can't physically access caches? I don't think so. I find this notion personally insulting as I often cache with my parents who both have mobility issues but enjoy this a lot and I'm thankful to the people who hide caches that they are able to get to instead of only hiding caches in very difficult terrain or that are extremely difficult to find (especially for my dad who has some neurological issues which makes finding things difficult at times). We have to remember this community is filled with more people than just extremely fit of mind and body.

 

Some people like me have tried the micro/nano search and hated it with a passion should we be newbies because we prefer to find more substantial caches? No. It's just my style of caching.

 

And some people like me live in a climate which doesn't enable a great variety of cache containers or locations.

 

I think so long as you are unwilling to learn you're a newbie in the negative sense.

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<snip>

 

I've never fallen a creek, however I have ended up at the bottom of a hill on my butt with rocks in my pants on several occasions, does the noobity class cover that aspect?

 

<snip>

 

Zis depends on the kind of rocks. We frown on common shale; granite, quartz, and mica are highly recommended.

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<snip>

 

I've never fallen a creek, however I have ended up at the bottom of a hill on my butt with rocks in my pants on several occasions, does the noobity class cover that aspect?

 

<snip>

 

Zis depends on the kind of rocks. We frown on common shale; granite, quartz, and mica are highly recommended.

 

Ummmm..... Shale was involved, but I think i pulled out several strawberry sized quartz, and some of the highly touted very rare round gray variety. Oh, and a handful of acorns.

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<snip>

 

Really newbie-ness is probably best quantified by how sharp your geosense is and how easily you can find caches. I don't imagine someone who has been caching for years and has hundreds of finds is likely to be a newbie.

 

<snip>

Ruh, hoh...Ima newb. :anicute:

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You are no longer a n00b when you can go at least 6 months without being stumped by a 1/1 hide.

 

After almost 6-1/2 years and almost 2700 finds, I'm still a n00b. :anicute:

 

Oh jeez... I'm definitely noobish then. I can find a 3.5 difficulty bison drilled into a tree at night with a flashlight, but I can't find a 1/1 in a Walmart parking lot... (I'm going back to try to find said 1/1 this afternoon. I will get it eventually!)

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You ask a very deep question.

 

Here at the University of BlueBow, we have put together a comprehensive, 3 month course in Noobity: What it is and what it isn't. This is a prerequisite for the companion course "Finding your inner noob with a GPS". The course will cover the following topics: "wrong side of the creek", "falling IN the creek", "what to do when the batteries die", "use of the GPS as a flashlight", "nano-log rolling", and the ever popular "dirty fighting tricks for that FTF".

 

If you, and more importantly, your GPS, survive this course, you will receive a diploma certifying that you are no longer a noob. But there is no time to waste - enroll today for the low cost of $169.99, plus sales tax, before this opportunity is gone.

 

Otherwise... you will remain a sad, questioning noob!

 

It's very important to learn to embrace your inner n00b.

 

Remember what it was like, running around as a n00b without a care in the world? Well stop remembering and start embracing your inner n00b! Log your DNFs! Admit you can't find them all! Also, forget about the numbers and treat every cache like it was your first adventure. Don't obsess over the small caches. Move on quickly if you can't find them! :anicute:

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Just as soon as you have shed blood involuntarily doing all of the following:

  • finding a cache
  • hiding a cache
  • opening a cache
  • preparing a cache
  • logging a cache

I read this earlier, wondered how long it would be before these happened to me. Then I went out and accidentally impaled myself on some thorns while finding only my tenth cache ever.

 

Maybe I will stop being a total noob faster than I would've thought. :anicute:

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You ask a very deep question.

 

Here at the University of BlueBow, we have put together a comprehensive, 3 month course in Noobity: What it is and what it isn't. This is a prerequisite for the companion course "Finding your inner noob with a GPS". The course will cover the following topics: "wrong side of the creek", "falling IN the creek", "what to do when the batteries die", "use of the GPS as a flashlight", "nano-log rolling", and the ever popular "dirty fighting tricks for that FTF".

 

If you, and more importantly, your GPS, survive this course, you will receive a diploma certifying that you are no longer a noob. But there is no time to waste - enroll today for the low cost of $169.99, plus sales tax, before this opportunity is gone.

 

Otherwise... you will remain a sad, questioning noob!

 

It's very important to learn to embrace your inner n00b.

 

Remember what it was like, running around as a n00b without a care in the world? Well stop remembering and start embracing your inner n00b! Log your DNFs! Admit you can't find them all! Also, forget about the numbers and treat every cache like it was your first adventure. Don't obsess over the small caches. Move on quickly if you can't find them! :anicute:

 

And don't forget to fall in a creek or down the hill every now and then! Acorns make great ball bearings underfoot, btw - trust me!

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