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Question about lock-n-lock containers


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Over the winter I ordered a set of official lock-n-lock containers from geocaching.com in anticipation of placing my first cache this Spring. Yesterday I was out scouting locations and after finding a suitable spot, I began to test fit the L & L containers into the space. I am speaking specifically of the three containers from GC.com that come nested into each other. My question is this:

 

Is there an official size designation for each of those containers? In other words, is the smallest one considered a "Micro", the next smallest a "Small", and the largest a "Regular"?? I'd like to know so that when I finally go to write up the cache for publication that I'm giving it the proper size listing.

 

Sorry for the long drawn out question, but I didn't know a better way to word it. Thanks in advance for the help.

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First off, I don't mean this to sound as unfriendly as it might appear - but, have you read the Guidelines?

From appearances, you haven't. You need to. Reason(s):

 

There is a Groundspeak requirement to read their Cache Listing Guidelines - and in fact when you submit a cache for listing, you must physically check a 'radio button' averring you HAVE both read, & understand them. To wit:

[ ] "Yes. I have read and understand the guidelines for listing a cache. "

 

And IF you had in fact read those guidelines, you should have remembered this l'l section:

Cache Sizes

Cache sizes for all caches that have a physical container.

• Micro (35 mm film canister or smaller – less than approximately 3 ounces or .1 litres -- typically containing only a logbook)

• Small (Sandwich-sized Tupperware-style container or similar -- less than approximately 1 quart or litre -- holds trade items as well as a logbook)

• Regular (Tupperware-style container or ammo can)

• Large (5 gallon/20 litre bucket or larger)

-- which answers your question.

 

Link to the Guidelines: http://www.geocaching.com/about/guidelines.aspx

 

~*

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I'd say the smaller two are "Smalls" and the third a "Regular".

 

I would have to agree with BBWolf. Micros are typically considered 35mm or bison tube size. You usually cannot fit anything but the log, maybe a micro coin, into a micro container.

 

I condsider smalls were you can get a couple of trade items, TBs or coins into the container with a log book.

 

Regular would be on the order of an ammo box. The larger L-N-L out fit the bill.

 

Tsnake

Link to comment

First off, I don't mean this to sound as unfriendly as it might appear - but, have you read the Guidelines?

From appearances, you haven't. You need to. Reason(s):

 

There is a Groundspeak requirement to read their Cache Listing Guidelines - and in fact when you submit a cache for listing, you must physically check a 'radio button' averring you HAVE both read, & understand them. To wit:

[ ] "Yes. I have read and understand the guidelines for listing a cache. "

 

And IF you had in fact read those guidelines, you should have remembered this l'l section:

Cache Sizes

Cache sizes for all caches that have a physical container.

• Micro (35 mm film canister or smaller – less than approximately 3 ounces or .1 litres -- typically containing only a logbook)

• Small (Sandwich-sized Tupperware-style container or similar -- less than approximately 1 quart or litre -- holds trade items as well as a logbook)

• Regular (Tupperware-style container or ammo can)

• Large (5 gallon/20 litre bucket or larger)

-- which answers your question.

 

Link to the Guidelines: http://www.geocaching.com/about/guidelines.aspx

 

~*

 

Well as a matter of fact, you DID come off sounding rather rude. I know that I have checked those guidelines in the past, but not too recently as I have yet to officially hide my first cache. I just figured that since the measurements of those containers were not posted with the online description, someone else who may have used them could help to clear the air.

 

As for them being "Tupperware sized", to me that's all relative. Some folks may not have several different Tupperware containers for which to compare, and since they truthfully are not Tupperware, true comparisons might not be accurate. As a matter of fact, I would not even attempt to put a sandwich into either of the two smallest containers, because I know they wouldn't fit. However, if that's the best description available, then I guess that's what I'll have to go with.

 

I'll forgive you for sounding rude, but next time someone asks a legitimate question, you might want to consider cutting them some slack...they may not be as experienced as you are.

Edited by crockett3663
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Most lock-n-locks will fit the small - regular category.

 

This thread may cause controversy because there has been a negative trend to move the size of caches up one notch. I think this is because of the explosion of Nano caches with no Nano size designation. The category with the most movement has been the Micro.

 

Now people who hide true nano caches think that is a micro, and a pill bottle must be a small, if a pill is a small then the decon container must be a regular, and an ammo can is GINORMOUS.

 

IMHO I think that GS needs to have another size for Nano. Here are my reasons. Hunting a nano really requires more skill than hunting a micro (35mm can). I would think that having a Nano category would help with this bad shift of geocaching opinion.

Link to comment

First off, I don't mean this to sound as unfriendly as it might appear - but, have you read the Guidelines?

From appearances, you haven't. You need to. Reason(s):

 

There is a Groundspeak requirement to read their Cache Listing Guidelines - and in fact when you submit a cache for listing, you must physically check a 'radio button' averring you HAVE both read, & understand them. To wit:

[ ] "Yes. I have read and understand the guidelines for listing a cache. "

 

And IF you had in fact read those guidelines, you should have remembered this l'l section:

Cache Sizes

Cache sizes for all caches that have a physical container.

• Micro (35 mm film canister or smaller – less than approximately 3 ounces or .1 litres -- typically containing only a logbook)

• Small (Sandwich-sized Tupperware-style container or similar -- less than approximately 1 quart or litre -- holds trade items as well as a logbook)

• Regular (Tupperware-style container or ammo can)

• Large (5 gallon/20 litre bucket or larger)

-- which answers your question.

 

Link to the Guidelines: http://www.geocaching.com/about/guidelines.aspx

 

~*

 

Well as a matter of fact, you DID come off sounding rather rude. I know that I have checked those guidelines in the past, but not too recently as I have yet to officially hide my first cache. I just figured that since the measurements of those containers were not posted with the online description, someone else who may have used them could help to clear the air.

 

As for them being "Tupperware sized", to me that's all relative. Some folks may not have several different Tupperware containers for which to compare, and since they truthfully are not Tupperware, true comparisons might not be accurate. As a matter of fact, I would not even attempt to put a sandwich into either of the two smallest containers, because I know they wouldn't fit. However, if that's the best description available, then I guess that's what I'll have to go with.

 

I'll forgive you for sounding rude, but next time someone asks a legitimate question, you might want to consider cutting them some slack...they may not be as experienced as you are.

 

Just passing 41 hours without sleep, running on hi-test coffee - I tried to be helpful, point you to the information you needed, cite it for you....and keep it below a 3-page essay. I realized it sounded a little brusque, and rather than re-compose it for the 7th time I lead in with the 'disclaimer', which was as honest as I could make it. Brief & to the point.....and show you where you could find & verify the info. My bad!

 

Thank you for forgiving me, I really needed that. I sincerely apologize for trying to help you -- I won't make the same mistake again.

 

Have a nice eternity.

~*

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This thread may cause controversy because there has been a negative trend to move the size of caches up one notch. I think this is because of the explosion of Nano caches with no Nano size designation. The category with the most movement has been the Micro.

 

True. The first micros that I was aware of were Altiods tins and I thought at the time that it was awfully small container. Now some people list Altoids tins and even film canisters as small.

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Thank you for forgiving me, I really needed that. I sincerely apologize for trying to help you -- I won't make the same mistake again.

 

Have a nice eternity.

~*

 

:):blink::blink: LAME :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

 

Crocket,

I would agree with everyone else that the Groundspeak containers are a small, small, regular based on the product description and everyone elses input. But what do I know I've only got four hides instead of 35. I only hope that the response from Star*Hopper hasn't taken away any of your excitement towards placing your first cache. Go with your gut and remember to have fun cause no one wins!

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Thank you for forgiving me, I really needed that. I sincerely apologize for trying to help you -- I won't make the same mistake again.

 

Have a nice eternity.

~*

Too bad this board doesn't have a "Don't Be A Jerk" rule...

 

"Banned for life"

If only...

 

Sorry for the side note on this thread but Star*Hopper is pretty proud of himself and actually put "Banned for life" as his forum title on his profile page. I wanted to see how much of an authority he was, not impressed!

 

Anyway, I still say small, small, regular

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Yeah, some people just need to complain about caches or act superior.

I hid the medium of the 3-size lock-n-lock set and had it listed as a Small cache, which it is, and still got a complaint from the FTF that the cache was smaller than they thought it would be. I even listed the dimensions of the container on the cache page!

 

Right now I'm using the smallest of those lock-n-locks as a holder of TBs, geocoins and swag.

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Cache sizes for all caches that have a physical container.

• Micro (35 mm film canister or smaller – less than approximately 3 ounces or .1 litres -- typically containing only a logbook)

• Small (Sandwich-sized Tupperware-style container or similar -- less than approximately 1 quart or litre -- holds trade items as well as a logbook)

• Regular (Tupperware-style container or ammo can)

• Large (5 gallon/20 litre bucket or larger) [/b]

As for them being "Tupperware sized", to me that's all relative. Some folks may not have several different Tupperware containers for which to compare, and since they truthfully are not Tupperware, true comparisons might not be accurate. As a matter of fact, I would not even attempt to put a sandwich into either of the two smallest containers, because I know they wouldn't fit. However, if that's the best description available, then I guess that's what I'll have to go with.

Regular (Tupperware sized) containers are larger than a small and smaller than a large.

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Thanks to those of you who've had my back during all of this. I certainly didn't think a thread regarding container size would create so much animosity, debate, and contraversy.

 

I'll go along with those who've said "small, small, regular".

 

Oh, it wasn't that bad, and the Hopper has been reprimanded. :) Yeah, as BrianSnat said, the smallest Lock-n-Lock on the market (and I'm sure at this point I've seen every single product, including an egg carton) I would characterize as a small.

Link to comment

First off, I don't mean this to sound as unfriendly as it might appear - but, have you read the Guidelines?

From appearances, you haven't. You need to. Reason(s):

 

There is a Groundspeak requirement to read their Cache Listing Guidelines - and in fact when you submit a cache for listing, you must physically check a 'radio button' averring you HAVE both read, & understand them. To wit:

[ ] "Yes. I have read and understand the guidelines for listing a cache. "

 

And IF you had in fact read those guidelines, you should have remembered this l'l section:

Cache Sizes

Cache sizes for all caches that have a physical container.

• Micro (35 mm film canister or smaller – less than approximately 3 ounces or .1 litres -- typically containing only a logbook)

• Small (Sandwich-sized Tupperware-style container or similar -- less than approximately 1 quart or litre -- holds trade items as well as a logbook)

• Regular (Tupperware-style container or ammo can)

• Large (5 gallon/20 litre bucket or larger)

-- which answers your question.

 

Link to the Guidelines: http://www.geocaching.com/about/guidelines.aspx

 

~*

 

WOW, you could have saved yourself a lot of trouble and simply typed RTFM.

Hell of a way to treat a new geocacher that is asking for advice.

Link to comment

First off, I don't mean this to sound as unfriendly as it might appear - but, have you read the Guidelines?

From appearances, you haven't. You need to. Reason(s):

 

There is a Groundspeak requirement to read their Cache Listing Guidelines - and in fact when you submit a cache for listing, you must physically check a 'radio button' averring you HAVE both read, & understand them. To wit:

[ ] "Yes. I have read and understand the guidelines for listing a cache. "

 

And IF you had in fact read those guidelines, you should have remembered this l'l section:

Cache Sizes

Cache sizes for all caches that have a physical container.

• Micro (35 mm film canister or smaller – less than approximately 3 ounces or .1 litres -- typically containing only a logbook)

• Small (Sandwich-sized Tupperware-style container or similar -- less than approximately 1 quart or litre -- holds trade items as well as a logbook)

• Regular (Tupperware-style container or ammo can)

• Large (5 gallon/20 litre bucket or larger)

-- which answers your question.

 

Link to the Guidelines: http://www.geocaching.com/about/guidelines.aspx

 

~*

 

Well as a matter of fact, you DID come off sounding rather rude. I know that I have checked those guidelines in the past, but not too recently as I have yet to officially hide my first cache. I just figured that since the measurements of those containers were not posted with the online description, someone else who may have used them could help to clear the air.

 

As for them being "Tupperware sized", to me that's all relative. Some folks may not have several different Tupperware containers for which to compare, and since they truthfully are not Tupperware, true comparisons might not be accurate. As a matter of fact, I would not even attempt to put a sandwich into either of the two smallest containers, because I know they wouldn't fit. However, if that's the best description available, then I guess that's what I'll have to go with.

 

I'll forgive you for sounding rude, but next time someone asks a legitimate question, you might want to consider cutting them some slack...they may not be as experienced as you are.

 

My answer to your LEGITMATE question is that despite what is listed in the official guidelines, it is a regional thing. In my neck of the woods, It would be small, small, small, The guy next to me would call it small, small, regular. In my region, where caches are getting smaller and smaller, it's all a matter of perception on what you are discovering on your Geocaching runs. In other parts of the country where a thumbnail sized micro, (nano) isn't hidden every tenth of a mile down the street, the biggest one out of the set may be considered a large.

 

My best advice, and I haven't read your profile, so I have no preconceived notions as to your experience, is to get out there and find a bunch of caches. Pay attention to not only the sizes assigned by you local cachers, but also the difficulty and terrains ratings. This will best help you gauge what their expectations are. After all, you are hiding it so that they can find it. It will also help you understand what may required to find their caches.

 

As an example, A T1 in Southern California means that you can reach it in your wheelchair, A T1 in Southern Nevada means that you may have to park on the highway and walk a quarter of a mile through the cactus, dodging the lizards and the snakes.

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