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help on caches


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Ummmm....

 

Do you have a GPS? Do you know how to put in cache coordinates and GO TO the coordinates?

 

If so, try some easier traditional caches at first before you get into micros.

 

I hope this was helpful. If it wasn't please ask a more specific question.

Edited by wesleykey
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i have a nuvi 660 i go to the coordinates do a 30 foot radis search and it all ways turns up nothing i search high and low.

 

Theres your problem...It hard to find caches with a nuvi or another road travelling gps. I know of some people who do it with success, but for someone who is just starting out it wont work the greatest. other handheld gps's like a garmin etrex are cheap and can get you much much closer to any cache then a nuvi.

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It may sound a bit simple, we started with a print out of each cache on the list. The print out was great to make notes on, and track any TB that might be their if you don't wish to take them. We could double check the numbers, would have the description if their was one, and the hint to decode if needed. You could use the Google map / sat view for clues before you get their. If you can bring a pup for cover if you could be in one area for a while. Don't give up too easily. I seconed the hand held unit. Good luck.

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i have a nuvi 660 i go to the coordinates do a 30 foot radis search and it all ways turns up nothing i search high and low.

 

You may want to look up the nuvi topic thread. There are some great helps out there.

As other have stated, the nuvi isn't made to Geocache, but you CAN.

 

One thing you may want to do is option it for "Off Road" and "Pedestrian" and that should help some.

Also, there is a satelitte page from the main menu, push and hold on the top left where the satellite bars are, this should get you a page that gives you actual coordinates. Moving N-S and E-W until the nuvi reads the same coords as the cache will get you pretty close. Read the cache page, unless the difficulty is way up there, hidden deviously or a puzzle cache, you should locate the cache quickly.

 

Try the 1.5/1.5 D/T caches and look for either small or regular size containers to start out with.

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I am having trouble too, I guess I just don't know what I am looking for exactly. I have an etrex vista Hcx, and really have yet to find a hidden cache. I did find a few simple ones but those don't count.

 

What are some common ways people hide these things?

Edited by padlk
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I am having trouble too, I guess I just don't know what I am looking for exactly. I have an etrex vista Hcx, and really have yet to find a hidden cache. I did find a few simple ones but those don't count.

 

What are some common ways people hide these things?

 

When just starting i would suggest, before you go after a cache i would read through some or all of the logs on the cache this will give you a good idea how people have made out with it. If it is a micro or has a higher difficulty rating stay away from it, read the hint before you even go out. There are many differnt ways to hide caches, Start wiht some 1/1 regular caches and you can usually bet they will be a) under a fallen tree b ) tucked inside of a tree c) underneath a pile of brush(or neatly placed pile of sticks) d) underneath the branches of an evergreen tree or e) undernaeth a bush

Start witht he easier ones before you go after any micros or 2/2+ ratings

Edited by BRETTIOP
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Thanks very much to those who replied. I have had a bit more luck as of late, I have 5 finds now. Darn micros are the bane of my caching existence. :(

 

Of course my DH on his first outing found a micro. I guess different people approach things in different ways. It's nice we are a team in this.

Edited by padlk
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When you say "in" a guardrail, how do you mean? Stuck in an end?

They can get creative, Their are many locations of different sizes that can hold different types of containers. I've seen film cans, magnetic key holders, peanut butter jar size anything. A guard rail my also be used for something else other than along side the road. I did one and it was made into another type of functional lawn furniture in a near by park.

GL

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Do a Google search for 'cache container' and look at some of the stuff people make and / or sell. It will give you an idea of what you may be looking for.

 

Also, the size of the cache is usually specified on the cache page. The definitions for each size are usually a good indication, but sometimes people get creative and the caches are actually larger or smaller than the example given for a certain size.

 

Keep in mind you may see lots of similar caches in your area -- some folks are lazy and not very creative.

Some of our common containers include waterproof match containers zip-tied to a tree limb, magnetic key holders stuck to guard rails, fake dog poop, fake rocks, decon containers in evergreen trees, etc...

 

In some cases the cache description or text will give you a clue. In one case, a cache name described a tree that lost its leaves in the fall and had a forked trunk. Container was in a small opening where the tree trunk split. One cache name referenced a kids story that had to do with a troll guarding a bridge. The cache was under a small metal plate acting as a bridge across a drainage channel on a sidewalk.

 

Use the satellite feature on Google maps to zoom into the cache location. For instance, one local cache appeared to be in a parking lot at a shopping center. Zooming in and studying the photo showed there was a lamp post there. The cache was hidden under the metal cover at the base of the pole.

 

If all else fails, find an experienced cacher buddy and let him show you the ropes.

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In reply to Brettiop, who recommended staying away from micros, this is not always the case.

DH and I live in the burbs, and almost all of the caches around here are micro or nano. Most are easy finds, being located around statues, signposts, and the like.

You just have to get used to looking for things like film cannisters. And when the GPS bleeps at you and all you can see is a lamp-post, lift up the metal casing at the base of the thing. People are fond of hiding micros and nanos underneath those. We have found lots of that type. We also found one that was a magnetic container stuck to the guard rail in a parking lot.

While we havent' found many woods caches, the ones hereabouts seem to be good-sized containers with some decent swag. If you need to look inside a tree or poke around in a pile of twigs, you may want to use a stick instead of plunging your hand in. I also recommend a pair of gardening gloves to protect yourself from scratches and bug bites.

Also, read the hints provided with the listing. Once you get good at finding them, you may not need to do this, but it does help at first. I do that myself, but I'm getting used to the way that these people think. (Gads! Did I really just say that?)

Edited by pugsley&wednesday
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i have a nuvi 660 i go to the coordinates do a 30 foot radis search and it all ways turns up nothing i search high and low.

 

Theres your problem...It hard to find caches with a nuvi or another road travelling gps. I know of some people who do it with success, but for someone who is just starting out it wont work the greatest. other handheld gps's like a garmin etrex are cheap and can get you much much closer to any cache then a nuvi.

 

I use a Mio 220. a low end road GPS and I have found over 50 with it. The only problem is it gets bad reception in the woods and the battery dosent last long.

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1) Get yourself a good GPS. Good means also cheap and simple.

 

2) Read the general guidfelines and the "getting started" related articles. Read also carefully cache description and logs of previous cachers who found it

 

3) Ultimately caching skill is about expereience. When I started I couldn't find anything. I found my first cache on my third day of caching. On the second day I had 5 DNF out of 5 caches. I began to think that geocaching is boring and it is not rewarding at all. Eventually I developed some geo-skills and I started to enjoy more and more. Now my cache count is 101. I feel like I have improved a lot but I also feel that still have soooo much to learn!

 

Leo

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My daughter and I just started geocaching. I think it's really important when you get to a site to think about where you would hide something. Know what size of cache you're looking for. We are in Wyoming and have urban and lots of country caches. Look up, look in the tree, around the post. Read the hints, decrypt them, and check the photo gallery. Anything to get started. Look for something 'out of place.' We find caches by looking for things that don't look natural, not quite the right color, sticks or rocks piled up too neatly. Last Sunday we found a regular size cache (peanut butter jar) inside a guard rail post, a film canister tucked at the base of a fence post, an ammo can tucked into some rocks, a small spackle jar under a sagebrush, and a strange tube-like container hanging in a tree. We are bummed that we'll be shut down soon with winter weather (at least some of our hiking), but hopefully will get better at finding some of those micros in town. Good luck, keep after it and have fun!

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My first geocaching adventure Sunday was using an old Garmin GPS 45 from 1995 (no maps) which scans 8 satellites (not all at once like current units) accurate to 15 meters (49 ft) under optimum conditions. It seems to have some float in its location, but indicates to 0.01 mi increments for waypoint distances. Since it only has 6 char waypoint names and 16 char notes, I use Palm TX memo for paperless details.

 

Since a couple of people had logged that the 1st (a pill bottle) had rolled downhill, I thought I found the location when I found a hole in the base of a tree. It looked like a critter lived there (which I thought explained how it rolled out), so I did not want to stick my ungloved hand into the hole. It took some searching to find the real location. It was close to, but not visible from there, and almost invisible when looking directly at it from a different angle (in dark U-bracket).

 

The 2nd was a key container at a structure a set distance in approximate direction from waypoint. Should have been a cinch right? But was it under a metal park bench, on a lamp post, or somewhere on the very open metal structure? One logger DNF'd. I finally spotted it from a different angle after almost giving up searching similar spots elsewhere on the structure.

 

So sometimes what seems like an obvious place draws your attention away from where it really is (to keep muggles from discovering it). And sometimes it is in the most obvious hiding place, but there are so many of them that you have to keep trying until you find it. What surprised me is how hard they can be to see even when you find them.

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I use a Garmin gps map 76 and it cost a bunch but it works great. I get within 5- 10 ft. it reads 12 different satellites. The key is not getting in a rush and looking at each and every single thing you see. Check it out not everything is at it seems! false fence post tops, Fake wooden fence posts, hollowed out pine cones etc..... Hope this helps!

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