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Girl Scout Cache


rnlorna
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Hi,

 

My daughter's girl scout troop (8 nine year olds) would like to hide a cache and then read the logs at their weekly meeting. Has anyone done a troop hide? I'm sure the girls would love it. I was thinking of something called Girls Rule and all the things inside are girly. Hairbrush, mirror, hair things, etc. Maybe even a Girl Scout Doll travel bug that wants to meet other girl scouts. Does anyone have experiences they would like to share?

Thanks,

rnlorna

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No experiences with hiding girl scout caches -- but if you're hoping to read the logs at weekly meetings, then you'll want something that is going to be found fairly frequently, over a sustained period (not just when it's new). So you might want to look at caches around your area to see what characteristics the most frequently-visited ones have in common.

 

Most likely, some of these common features will be:

  • a traditional cache (not a puzzle or a multi -- a lot of people filter those out automatically)
  • a very short walk from the car to the cache (anything over a quarter of a mile will be rejected by a lot of people)
  • in a place with easily accessible parking
  • in a place that's near lots of people (not out in the middle of nowhere)
  • in a place without lots of thorns, brambles, swamps, bugs, etc.
  • maybe near some other caches, so people can pick up a couple at once
  • very low D/T ratings (not higher than 2/2)
  • if you live in an area that gets snow in the winter, a winter-friendly cache would be good -- one that's not hidden at ground level in a place where it's likely to get covered with snow. A lot of caches go unfound for months during the winter. And in the winter, a lot of cachers will be looking specifically for caches that are listed as winter-friendly.

Maybe a bribe would be good: you could mention on your cache page that you'll be reading the logs at the weekly meetings, and that the best one will win a free box of Thin Mints at cookie-selling season <_<

(Even without the bribe, though, it will be good to mention on the cache page that you'll be reading the logs at the meetings. That might prompt a few finders who normally write very short logs to add an extra sentence or two, to make the kids happy.)

 

We have had some experience finding scout caches. The newly-placed ones have all been nice. A few of the older ones have fallen into disrepair, when the troop disbanded or as the original group of scouts grew up and were replaced by a new batch of kids. (But that's pretty much the same as regular, non-scout caches, too.)

Edited by the hermit crabs
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If you want to do a Girl Scout Cache then you will need a very large container - especially since you said it is eight 9-year-olds. Personally, I don't think Girl Scouts would make very good swag.....

I think that the smell might attract animals that would trash the container.

 

Seriously though, I helped a brownie troop hide a Cache after doing a presentation to their troop. They enjoy reading the logs and looking at the pictures visitors to the cache upload to gc.com, they also are following the travels of a TB that they launched at around the same time.

 

Jamie

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I think this is a great idea...take a second and go to the geacaching.com sight and in the search for cache field enter zip code 54729...This will take to Chippewa Falls, Wi. On page 1 you'll see a series of caches placed by the Chippewa Falls Middle School...You might be able to get some ideas from them...good luck & happy hunting

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I would think that hiding and/or finding a cache would probably meet a badge requirement. It's been a few years (8 to be exact) since I was a Brownie leader, but I know GS is always stressing that girls can and should participate in science & technology fields. The TB would probably also help toward another badge requirement.

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Not to be a party pooper.. but make certain someone responsible is in charge of the cache, and that it's logs and e-mails get read reguarly. There is a Girl Scout Troop Cache in MT that was placed with bad coordinates and noone has ever been back online to read any of the issues since it was placed. And as far asI can tell, nobody has been able to contact the girl's family to get anything done. Over 6 months now and nobody has ever logged back online to check it- or responded to folks who have e-mailed the placer to offer assistance.

Please! Make sure it is actually watched!

-J

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Good point. We had a cache here placed in a "private" neighborhood park by the local GS Troop.

 

A neighbor, whose dog barked everytime someone came in search of the cache, got angry, emptied the container, and put dog poop in it. :laughing:

 

That did not turn out to be a very good experience for local cachers or the troop . . . :laughing:

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Grat ideas! Thanks everyone, I especially like the idea about the coupon for a free box of cookies, since cookie season is upon us (already!). I am getting excited about this, and all the the comments will make it easier on the girls. I plan on being the responisble one, maintaining, etc, with the girls' help. I'm sure they will be thrilled with the logs, and I like the ideas about easy placement and terrain. I do want it to be visited frequently, so we'll keep the good swag up.

Thanks so much,

 

rnlorna

 

Also, thanks about the badge ideas. : )

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Perhaps a local cacher could help the troop "sponsor" the cache. Actually logging the thing and uploading it...but call it "Troop 555" or something.

 

Then have the girls (with troop money or their own) buy the items for the swag. They would be doing the decision-making, planning and selecting. Have them also pick a FTF item, like a Travel Bug of their own, called (i.e.) "Troop 555" and a postage-paid coupon for the FTF person to send in their cookie wish (and address for you to send their cookies!). Find a cookie magnet at a local dollar store and make that the TB.

I would also put in some business cards for your local council office (which is just a push for Girl Scouting - a non-profit organization), and maybe some handmade items the girls can do or make themselves (friendship bracelets, swap-pins, fun patches).

THEN, you should find out from your council also about a web-page for your troop's activities (again, with help the girls design it) where you can post your log-finds to share with other troops and girls across the country. You could also share where your travel bug went, even make it's mission to visit other councils (and troops) across the USA... I can tell you that if it ever visited cache # GCJXRO, GCKQ5Q or GCH613, I would be very happy to add to its journey!

What a neat idea you have for your girls!

 

<...proud mom of Daisy Troop...>

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We've been working on a Girl Scout cache for Junior troop 258 in Paradise/Magalia. We asked that each of the Girls in the troop bring a trade item to put in the cache and for a FTF find we are giving a certificate for 4 boxes of cookies. We also set out a TB about 3 months ago for the troop to track The Cache should be up and running the middle of next week sometime. 3 1/2 gal bucket hidden in a heavily wooded area. The Girls don't know where it will be hidden either. They will have the opportunity to hunt for it with the rest of you. <_<

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I would think that hiding and/or finding a cache would probably meet a badge requirement. It's been a few years (8 to be exact) since I was a Brownie leader, but I know GS is always stressing that girls can and should participate in science & technology fields. The TB would probably also help toward another badge requirement.

My Brownie/Daisy troop did not hide a cache but I did and then let the girls find it and it did earn them a badge. They thought is was a lot of fun. Maybe we can out together a cache and hide it too, I like that idea. We can really promote the CITO aspect and that would earn them another badge.

 

BTW -- I like the idea of a coupon for cookies as the FTF prize. :drama:

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There is a local scout troop here in Marin County which has caches at every place the boy scouts have done something to help the community. Whether it be where the local scouts have cleaned a community garden of weeds or painted those "Drains to Bay" icons on the drains on the street, one in the county north of us pointed out where the scouts had painted this huge wall which was becomong an eye sore. The caches are informative and fun, and some of them are really hard to find. They are some of my favorite caches. She offers a scout patch to the cachers who log the rule to live by or whatever it is, Like Obedience, Cleanliness, Honor...These are listed somewhere on each cache, and once you get all ten of them you send her the words which correlate with each cahe to get your patch. Don't forget the contents of the cache will change with every person who visits it and exchanges something.

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This purported new Girl Scouts hide had many of us Houston-area cachers scratching our heads all day yesterday before it was disabled. Despite the glitch, I'm sure that anything you come up with will be appreciated by both the Girl Scouts and the local cachers. Have fun!

 

Wow! 5 hours? I sure hope that doesn't happen to our cache. There are a lot of great ideas here. Thanks for passing them on. I meet with the girls again on Tuesday, maybe we'll forge a plan and set aside some Thin Mints! I will go by the Scout Store today and see if there is something cute there for a travel bug.

 

Thanks,

rnlorna

Edited by rnlorna
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...someone must be responsible to maintain or archive the cache when the kids lose interest. We had one set out by Cubs not far away that was recently archived by the approver after a long string of DNFs.

I would think it would make sense that:

 

If the girls are really interested in it, THEN they hide one of their own, otherwise, let them hunt a few and call it done.

 

If there is any question of them keeping it up, I would find a local cacher (through the reviewer) who would adopt it or "sponsor" it at least - so when that bunch of girls get older and don't do Girl Scouts any more (which happens frequently once they hit High School) if nobody else steps up to take care of it, at least a local GC'er can...

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