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Geocache Haiku


Godzirra
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quote:
Originally posted by Jeremy Irish:

Oh! What happened here.

Seems I can't geocache now

I have to subscribe.

 

No. Wait a minute

I don't have to subscribe here

Seems I can still play


 

That is so funny.

ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

I laugh in haiku!

 

Do Not take offense

I do not mean to be mean

Trying haiku laugh

 

Godzirra (roar)

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support or detract

goecaching.com is

for free or for pay

 

none are forced to pay

but why bother with facts

mouths of doom whine on

 

flower awaits sun

another chance to become

dark clouds rolling in

 

late night cant sleep oy

spent five minutes on haiku

beats cleaing the house

 

----------------------------

TeamWSMF@wsmf.org

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quote:
Originally posted by TeamWSMF:

waypoints call to us

seeking oursleves in caches

we find each other

 

flowing between us

points in space yearing to be

triangluated

 

twenty four angels

sing down to the ground below

welcome, you are here

 

----------------------------

TeamWSMF@wsmf.org


 

Markwell

Non omnes vagi perditi sunt

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quote:
Originally posted by oregone:

The laxatives found

in this cache are nothing like

Spring cherry blossoms

 

all rights reserved, all wrongs reversed


 

Or-e-gon-e wins!

Haikus cannot match HIS skills!

Sublime and so true!

 

2573_200.jpg

 

[This message was edited by EraSeek on March 17, 2002 at 01:01 PM.]

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In the cache I place

an eight-track and remember

brittle, dying leaves

 

* * *

 

It seems that geocaches would be the perfect place to write renga, which are a two-person collaboration of an extended haiku. The way a renga works is that one person writes a haiku with 5/7/5 syllables, and then the collaborator finishes the poem with two lines of 7/7 syllables that somehow comment on the original haiku.

 

An example would be:

 

The laxatives found

in this cache are nothing like

Spring cherry blossoms

 

Why did the hint not suggest

What a bear does in the woods?

 

(oregone & bjbest)

 

Anyone up for leaving haiku in the logs, to made into renga by a subsequent finder and then posted in the online logs?

 

Remember: traditional haiku typically mention a particular season (or a transition between seasons), or use a symbol of such (cherry blossoms, falling leaves, etc.).

 

I knew that graduate degree in poetry would pay off sometime! :-)

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To be a haiku

The syllables must number

5, 7 and 5

 

Traditionally,

They must refer to nature

Like clouds in the sky

 

(There are, I am told,

Alternate haiku schemes too

But I don't know them.)

 

(From Pan Chun over on the TiVo forums)

 

> Martin (Magellan 330)

Don't have time to program and record your shows while geocaching? Get a TiVo!

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The best part of it was that Pan Chun muffed the second line of first haiku in the initial post... he put an extra syllable in, someone caught it, and he had to edit the post. icon_wink.gif

 

And there have been 2 or 3 multi-page threads dedicated to TiVo haikus... just when one would peter out, another would perk up and spawn another pile of poetry. icon_smile.gif

 

> Martin (Magellan 330)

Don't have time to program and record your shows while geocaching? Get a TiVo!

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The best part of it was that Pan Chun muffed the second line of first haiku in the initial post... he put an extra syllable in, someone caught it, and he had to edit the post. icon_wink.gif

 

And there have been 2 or 3 multi-page threads dedicated to TiVo haikus... just when one would peter out, another would perk up and spawn another pile of poetry. icon_smile.gif

 

> Martin (Magellan 330)

Don't have time to program and record your shows while geocaching? Get a TiVo!

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quote:
Originally posted by martinp13:

Um... Lost Sailor... haiku is 5 syllables-7 syllables-5 syllables. No deviation. icon_smile.gif There was a good haiku on the TiVo forum explaining what a haiku was.... I'll have to go find it.

 

> Martin (Magellan 330)

Don't have time to program and record your shows while geocaching? Get a http://www.tivo.com!

 

I composed a haiku above that has 3-5-5 syllables before I was informed about the 5-7-5 "requirement". But my 3-5-5 haiku felt good and conveyed a spiritual feeling notwithstanding the "rule". And I thought that Japanese is pretty different than English. The 5-7-5 might better fit the cadence of the Japanese language. Not knowing anything previously about Haiku I searched and found that in fact there are many variations -especially in English because of this. Japanese does have a different configuration that the 5-7-5 fits. English uses less syllables to convey the same message. A 3-5-3 might be better. There are many other variables. See http://www.ahapoetry.com/haiku.htm#comego for areally interesting discussion on this.

 

Thanks godzirra for starting this topic. I think I can really get into this stuff.

 

Thanks

 

Alan

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quote:
Originally posted by martinp13:

Um... Lost Sailor... haiku is 5 syllables-7 syllables-5 syllables. No deviation. icon_smile.gif There was a good haiku on the TiVo forum explaining what a haiku was.... I'll have to go find it.

 

> Martin (Magellan 330)

Don't have time to program and record your shows while geocaching? Get a http://www.tivo.com!

 

I composed a haiku above that has 3-5-5 syllables before I was informed about the 5-7-5 "requirement". But my 3-5-5 haiku felt good and conveyed a spiritual feeling notwithstanding the "rule". And I thought that Japanese is pretty different than English. The 5-7-5 might better fit the cadence of the Japanese language. Not knowing anything previously about Haiku I searched and found that in fact there are many variations -especially in English because of this. Japanese does have a different configuration that the 5-7-5 fits. English uses less syllables to convey the same message. A 3-5-3 might be better. There are many other variables. See http://www.ahapoetry.com/haiku.htm#comego for areally interesting discussion on this.

 

Thanks godzirra for starting this topic. I think I can really get into this stuff.

 

Thanks

 

Alan

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quote:
Originally posted by Alan2:

 

I composed a haiku above that has 3-5-5 syllables before I was informed about the 5-7-5 "requirement". But my 3-5-5 haiku felt good and conveyed a spiritual feeling notwithstanding the "rule". And I thought that Japanese is pretty different than English. The 5-7-5 might better fit the cadence of the Japanese language...


 

In fact, English translators of Japanese haiku feel almost no bound to the 5-7-5 structure. I have seen some haiku translated as only one longish line. Alan is exactly right that a 5-7-5 structure works a lot better in Japanese, in terms of rhythm and also rhyme. It is my understanding that Japanese is also a syllabic language, so listeners would easily recognize the 5-7-5 pattern. In English, we don't count normally count syllables; we rely more heavily on accents, and in fact most formal poetry in English is accentual-syllabic, which means both the number of accents and the number of syllables matter. The most common accentual-syllabic line is iambic pentameter, as demonstrated by this famous line (which, alas, I may slightly be misquoting) by W.B. Yeats: "How can we tell the dancer from the dance?" (10 syllables, accents on CAN, TELL, DANC-, FROM, and DANCE).

 

Perhaps the best notion of a haiku in English can be derived from Beat poet Jack Kerouac, who suggests a "Western haiku" form that should "simply say a lot in three short lines in any Western language."

 

Some haiku from Basho, a Japanese master (translated to 5-7-5 standards):

 

I would lie down drunk

on a bed of stone covered

with soft pinks blooming.

* * *

Will it soon be spring?

They lay the groundwork for it,

the plum tree and the moon. (<--note 6 syll.)

* * *

No one walks this road

on which I travel, on which

autumn darkness falls.

* * *

2 Western haiku by Kerouac:

 

Missing a kick

at the icebox door

It closed anyway.

* * *

Those birds sitting

out there on the fence--

They're all going to die.

* * *

And finally, a geocache-ku to close:

 

Whom shall I thank for

this grass, this serendipitous

box of trinkets?

 

Optional reading assignment:

Trip Trap: Haiku on the Road from SF to NY, by Kerouac, Albert Saijo, and Lew Welch (Revised ed., Grey Fox Press, San Francisco, 1998).

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Here is a brief description of the haiku from Louis Turco in The New Book of Forms, which describes many poetic forms:

 

quote:
[The haiku is] a poem based on image, emotive utterance, and certain other characteristics as well: spareness, condensation, spontaneity and ellipsis, plus a seasonal element--they are about spring, summer, fall, or winter. Ideally, the haiku, though complete in itself, is open-ended in that its statment reverberates beyond the poem into overtone.

 

Now who will write the first geocaching sestina, pantoum, sonnet, or villanelle? icon_wink.gif

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Here is a brief description of the haiku from Louis Turco in The New Book of Forms, which describes many poetic forms:

 

quote:
[The haiku is] a poem based on image, emotive utterance, and certain other characteristics as well: spareness, condensation, spontaneity and ellipsis, plus a seasonal element--they are about spring, summer, fall, or winter. Ideally, the haiku, though complete in itself, is open-ended in that its statment reverberates beyond the poem into overtone.

 

Now who will write the first geocaching sestina, pantoum, sonnet, or villanelle? icon_wink.gif

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Thanks bjbest for defending my 3-5-5. I thought it was pretty good before I counted the number of syllables. Anyway since poetry expresses thoughts and feelings of the heart, it's often meaningless to "insist" on a particular "way" as everyone's relationship with God is different. Thanks again.

 

Alan

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n. pl. haiku, also hai·kus

1. A Japanese lyric verse form having three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables, traditionally invoking an aspect of nature or the seasons.

2. A poem written in this form.

 

That's from dictionary.com. If I write a three-line, 5-7-5 poem, and call it a limerick, does that make it a limerick? icon_smile.gif

 

As far as I'm concerned, this is like virtual caches or found/not-found: if you can convince yourself that you've logged it correctly, that's cool... the only person you have to answer to is yourself.

 

> Martin (Magellan 330)

Don't have time to program and record your shows while geocaching? Get a TiVo!

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n. pl. haiku, also hai·kus

1. A Japanese lyric verse form having three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables, traditionally invoking an aspect of nature or the seasons.

2. A poem written in this form.

 

That's from dictionary.com. If I write a three-line, 5-7-5 poem, and call it a limerick, does that make it a limerick? icon_smile.gif

 

As far as I'm concerned, this is like virtual caches or found/not-found: if you can convince yourself that you've logged it correctly, that's cool... the only person you have to answer to is yourself.

 

> Martin (Magellan 330)

Don't have time to program and record your shows while geocaching? Get a TiVo!

Link to comment

Haiku's By the Geocaching Poet: Theodocious

 

 

(Best when read live accompanied by a Koto or a Shakuhachi)

 

 

Frustration

 

Traffic on the road

My GPS is confused

I’m second to find

 

 

Decisions

 

I cannot find it

I’ve been searching for a while

Should I stay or go?

 

 

Puzzling

 

A wet soggy cache

The logbook is made of mush

How do I sign this?

 

 

Addiction

 

One more cache, just one

I really should go home now

After one more cache

 

 

 

No Juice

 

I have dead battries

I know I was close, so close

Maybe over there

 

 

 

Whatever it takes

 

Three in the morning

No one else is around here

I am first to find

 

 

To hear these poems read live, listen to show #35 of the podcacher podcast.

 

http://www.podcacher.com/?p=159

 

 

www.podcacher.com

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