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ras_oscar

Basecamp questions

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I import my GPX file into basecamp. The symbol titles on the map are the GC code followed by the name. To tidy things up Id like to limit it to the GC code only. If i right click on properties I can change one, but I see no option to change all waypoints in the database. Is there an option I am missing or is there another option on the import? I have GSAK if the GPX file needs to be altered.

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So.... don't import your GPX file into basecamp. Just save it directly to your GPS (or sd card). Basecamp messes with the formatting and it's just an extra ugly step to deal with.
If you have GSAK, you can go that route. It's much better for cache management. Use Basecamp to manage your personal waypoints, routes, and tracks. But not geocaches.

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Is there any alternatives for basecamp? As garmin have stopped updating basecamp and moved to explore app.

 

that new explore software is no more compatible with older models like gpsmap64s 

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3 hours ago, ras_oscar said:

I import my GPX file into basecamp. The symbol titles on the map are the GC code followed by the name. To tidy things up Id like to limit it to the GC code only. If i right click on properties I can change one, but I see no option to change all waypoints in the database. Is there an option I am missing or is there another option on the import? I have GSAK if the GPX file needs to be altered.

 

Yes, there is an option (CTRL+TAB) you are not aware of that will swap the map and data windows, allowing you to then select multiple data items for bulk editing..

 

Reference: GPSrChive > BaseCamp > Data Management > Viewing Data

 

Tip: Once you reconfigure window sizes as desired for each view, switching between them again BaseCamp will remember your preferences.

 

 

 

Edited by Atlas Cached

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3 hours ago, Mineral2 said:

So.... don't import your GPX file into basecamp. Just save it directly to your GPS (or sd card). Basecamp messes with the formatting and it's just an extra ugly step to deal with.
If you have GSAK, you can go that route. It's much better for cache management. Use Basecamp to manage your personal waypoints, routes, and tracks. But not geocaches.

I do both. I drop the GPX file into the GPS data card and I import it into basecamp. GPS to go find stuff and basecamp to view the wider map and plan trips.

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On 2/3/2020 at 11:47 AM, Atlas Cached said:

 

Yes, there is an option (CTRL+TAB) you are not aware of that will swap the map and data windows, allowing you to then select multiple data items for bulk editing..

 

Reference: GPSrChive > BaseCamp > Data Management > Viewing Data

 

Tip: Once you reconfigure window sizes as desired for each view, switching between them again BaseCamp will remember your preferences.

 

 

 

The problem is not multi select. That I can do from either window. The problem s editing how the cache is displayed on the map. Try this:

 

Open basecamp

zoom on a single cache

double click to bring up cache properties 

In the upper right corner is a pull down menu. The options are "Symbol", "Symbol and Name", "Symbol and Code". I can change one from "Symbol and Name" to "Symbol and code". Id like to make that change wholesale to the entire database.

 

Does basecamp support Macros?

Edited by ras_oscar

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Well, apparently the same functionality that exists to edit multiple waypoints simultaneously does not apply to geocaches.

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Basecamp and geocaching just don't play well together. You can use the map feature in GSAK to plan and get better results.

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i've seen individual caches mapped in GSAK, wasn't aware there was also an option to display the entire database? 

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I toss entire PQs (or more specifically, my own 'rectangles') into GSAK, and export them with a %drop 2 of the GC code, and view the whole thing in Mapsource for route planning.  Still can't find a better (or even as good) solution with Basecamp.  Am able to take my planned route list of waypoints in Mapsource, highlight and select all of the GC codes in that Mapsource list, and copy them to an Excel spreadsheet to annotate and print for the actual cache run. 

 

For me, GSAK is what allows the subsequent map view with just GC codes (without the "GC") during export of the *.gdb.  Of course, it provides all kinds of pre-processing as well.  My macro goes out and grabs all of the unfound caches for both me and my caching buddy, does comparisons the result in "I need", "He needs", and "We need", excludes my list of 'problem' caches that I know won't be worth a visit, throws in all of my solved puzzles at the corrected coordinates, creates the POI files for my TomTom GPS and a bunch of other stuff.  The resulting *.gdb file sent to Mapsource shows just what I need to know to plan a cache run.

 

 

 

Edited by ecanderson

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soooo... I plan to use base camp to do the following:

 

1.  view the same maps as on my GPS

2. view the same caches as the GPX file on my GPS.

 

This allows me to plan trips offline, and for instance identify the parking location closest to the trailhead. 

 

I use Basecamp to complete these tasks. Unfortunately, the cache  titles are so large they obscure the underlying map and make achieving these objectives very difficult. The only other option I am aware of is  to do the planning online from Groundspeak, at the cost of clogging up Groundspeak bandwidth to view information I quite frankly have already downloaded

 

Is there a better tool to acheive these goals?

 

FYI I have also used an oooold version of MS streets. Unfortunately, that product does not show trails, so the planning facility is somewhat limited.

Edited by ras_oscar

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Either Basecamp or the old Mapsource will give you the tools to accomplish what you wish.  However, your choice of maps may be important.  The map you select for your GPS needn't be the same one you use to plan your runs.  I find that a topo is more useful on the GPS, while OSM routeable of the same area is usually of more use on the computer.  Of course, you can load both types of maps in both places, and bounce back and forth as needed, too. 

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I use OSM maps for virtually everything I do. I have recently returned to the game after a hiatus of several years. In my previous career I used mapsource. Basecamp was just coming out at that time so I *assumed* i should move to the newer product. I have recently seen traffic suggesting that basecamp development has been discontinued. Both are available for download today. I will ask this plainly:

 

Should I use

 

1.  Basecamp

2.  Mapsource ( Which I am very familiar with)

3.  Something else that's free

 

I have no interest in sharing my activities online. I moved to Basecamp primarily because the 2 programs are extremely similar and I assumed the newer product was continuing in development.

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I find that google maps or google earth are better for finding parking areas as you can scope out the area in full satellite detail. Both will also let you import your geocaching GPX files to view caches.

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Google maps seldom has the trail detail that is important to me If I'm in an area and there are tails not on my GPS map I can easily create them in OSM and update my map tiles once the adjustment comes back up to my consolidator. Yes, I have in the past used the google maps on Groundspeak to do what I want when all else fails. Looking for an offline solution.

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4 hours ago, ras_oscar said:

I use OSM maps for virtually everything I do. I have recently returned to the game after a hiatus of several years. In my previous career I used mapsource. Basecamp was just coming out at that time so I *assumed* i should move to the newer product. I have recently seen traffic suggesting that basecamp development has been discontinued. Both are available for download today. I will ask this plainly:

 

Should I use

 

1.  Basecamp

2.  Mapsource ( Which I am very familiar with)

3.  Something else that's free

 

I have no interest in sharing my activities online. I moved to Basecamp primarily because the 2 programs are extremely similar and I assumed the newer product was continuing in development.

Either 1 or 2, but I find that 2 operates far more quickly and without the fluff.  Don't know if you knew it, but with Mapsource, once you have a route prepared, you can go in and highlight the list with the mouse, and copy/paste all of the caches into a spreadsheet or Word file or whatever, so that you've got a handy reference of the order of things.  I use them to create lists like this for our runs.  The left column is what got pasted in from Mapsource.

 

 

 

 

XLS.jpg

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Installed mapsource, it automatically recognized all the maps I had installed in basecamp and brought them up. Opened each GPX file I had previously downloaded and saved in a mapsource backup file for future use. Who would have thought the solution to my issues was to go backwards :)

Edited by ras_oscar

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@Mineral2 @ras_oscar

 

sometimes hopping between applications is confusing, have you simply tried doing the following:

 

1) run a pocket querry / create a manual list from this website

2) import the .gpx file from the above into basecamp, under specific local list

3) **most important** use the free preview of birdseye to download the area around geoaches in 2 above to basecamp.  this gives you full view except that you can't save the file locally or send to your device if you don't have a subscription

4) map out whatever you need with the help of the gps view from above to the list, parking lots, walking route, whatever.

5) send the whole list to gps

 

 

i have been reading many posts people complaining that birdseye is stuck 10 years behind google, and in some areas i'm sure it's true.  i'm finding it to be 90% there in the woods/areas that i look at.  it seems that for a lot of my wooded areas birdseye tops out at 80ft resolution vs. google will go down to about 36ft, i think i can live with that as even at 80ft i'm able to see any trails, formations, etc. that i need.  if it's very heavy tree cover i won't see anything whether it's at 36ft, 80 or 200ft.

 

i use the above method to try to limit myself from hopping around different applications.  the really bad thing is that you can't see a global satelite view in basecamp, but if your workflow is to scope out a specific area/park/nature reserve the above should work just fine.

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I don't do that, but then, my method of planning relies less on ground truthing and more of just going out and exploring. Rather than hit up specific geocaches, I keep an updated set of PQ's/iCaching database that puts all geocaches (except unsolved mystery caches) on my device. Then I pick a place to go and if there are geocaches in the area, I'll find them.

Generally speaking, the trails on the Groundspeak map are good enough. I'm also fortunate enough to live in the northwest where detailed trail maps are available for the Garmin, thanks to @Moun10Bike. So in addition to using the Groundspeak map, I can also look for trails with geocaches on my GPS.

Since switching to an Oregon 600, I've been keeping a larger number of caches on the device in the GGZ format, which Basecamp doesn't read. So I use Basecamp exclusively for managing personal waypoints and tracks and occasional routing.  I use iCaching to manage my geocaches. And I plan hikes with a number of different resources. Most geocaches on hikes are located near geographic landmarks making it easy to find the general location on google maps, google earth, other mapping software, and even paper maps if I need additional trail research. Usually if there's a geocache placed, there's an established route. Most of the time, I'm happy just figuring out where the trailhead is and getting a general feel for the difficulty of the trip - length and elevation gain. The rest I'll discover as I go along. I usually don't even pre-route it ahead of time, simply using the maps as a guide to know what trails to turn onto. I prefer the adventure of the unknown. The main reason I want to know the trailhead location is so that I can navigate the maze of forest service/logging roads to get there.

Edited by Mineral2

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