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Steve Dogan

Being looked at funny for this stuff

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I've just always wondered.....how often do people get looked at strange for doing this? I mean, it always makes me a bit worried that someone is going to report a "suspicious" (term WAY over-used today!) person when they see you picking through a tree in a park or trying to reach in culvert pipes or a hundred other things to find these. About the only place I feel OK parking is a parking lot instead of on the shoulder of a road -especially a hi-way as I recently noticed it was either that or in a private parking lot across the street owned by a motel. Anyone ever have police or park maintenance workers or whoever walk up to them & drill them as to what they're doing? Heck, nowadays with the way things are you walk around (apparently aimlessly to others) in a public park when there's a woman with kids there anywhere and you're likely to have her get paranoid you're "up to something" & have the police on you!

Not saying I'm afraid of doing this and giving this geo-ing thing up. Just curious how often people get looked at funny for walking around all over looking and searching around & in things most people wouldn't.

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Just curious how often people get looked at funny for walking around all over looking and searching around & in things most people wouldn't.

 

Less than you might think. There are plenty of discussions about this in the forums...but generally if you act like you are doing nothing wrong (as you are, unless you are trespassing on private property), then people will generally ignore you. On the other hand, if you are crouching and skulking about, looking over your shoulder constantly...people will notice that.

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If there are too many people around and you feel uncomfortable with it...ABORT the search. Keep driving and find it another cache....

 

If you are afraid of being spotted - then chances are, you will be. Suspicious?

Doesn't matter. You aren't doing anything bad - but - you still are exposing that cache to muggles who can take the cache/container.

Edited by Lieblweb

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I've been in a few very very busy places with people walking and driving by and I doubt that one person even noticed me. They are going about their business as they do day to day with their same old routines none probably turned their heads long enough to notice someone searching for a cache. I had an officer stop once, thanks to a cache near a local police station. He only asked if I was one of those "geo trekkers". He had an idea what it was and I explained it to him and he just gave me a good luck and pulled off. Now I've also grown accustomed to finding caches on private property and front porches, the hiders generally love to talk and if you get a good spot like an old bed n breakfast you can learn some nice history from the people. I get more strange looks from friends that I talk about my geocaching adventures with than those that are just passing by and care to look my way.

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The only times I have been approached by anyone official, it has been pleasant enough. I explain what I'm doing, and never had any troubles. I can only think of two times over the years that security or police asked what I was doing.

 

People have approached me, curious about what I was doing. Generally if you just explain, it isn't a problem.

 

The only time I can remember someone looking at me strange was in a small neighborhood park. Middle of the day and no one else there. A woman who looked like she might be a mother of one of the kids in the neighborhood, was giving me a look that really made me feel dirty. Even though I was not doing anything out of line, and there were no kids anywhere in sight. :blink::huh: :huh:

Edited by uxorious

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Usually if you just continue to act like you know what you're doing, folks won't bother. (Think about it: If you see several people about doing things, which one attracts your attention? Usually the one who seems to be flustered or confused about what s/he is doing. Ok - sometimes our attention is attracted to other folks for other reasons, but all things being equal...)

 

I really think things are going to change. The hobby has been around for 13 years and is being presented to the general public more and more.

 

We have friends who started to home school their children in the early 1970s, and folks thought they were nuts - why would anyone want to do that?!? When we started in the late 1980s, there were folks who were mildly amused (or "concerned") even though there were a lot of large organizations and SIGs for home schooling families. Nowadays, no one has to ask what you mean or why when you mention home schooling. (Someday the spell checkers may actually recognize homeschool and homeschooling as valid words!)

 

In another 5 years or a decade geocaching may be so common that folks will simply look and say "That dude is looking for a geocache, of course. I wonder if I found that one yet..."

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Perhaps you need to change the tunes in your mental playlist? Hearing the theme songs to the

or
while you are caching is a sure way to draw attention to yourself. Otherwise just act like you are supposed to be there and doing what you are doing and most people will simply ignore you and go about their terribly busy lives.

 

But if you are questioned by law enforcement, be straight with them. Many of them already know about geocaching and understand that it's harmless clean fun. A few of them even cache with us.

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I've just always wondered.....how often do people get looked at strange ...

 

All the time. Oh, you mean only geocaching? :laughing:

 

Myself? not very often.

 

Others? Well, my caches must have a beacon to the police, because I usually hear stories about cachers getting stopped by the police. It's usually you're geocaching? Stay safe, good luck.

 

Of course we have a few officers who cache. Other than that, I've never really heard of anyone reporting us or anything like that.

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PINK PANTHER THEME! I gotta' try that next time! Youtube & Realplayer here I come!!!

Oh I'm not worried about getting asked, just curious how often it happens. In a small town like mine where you can take a short cut across the school playground -even during recess- and no one does anything except maybe wave to you, no one would even ask. But in the middle of the city is different. There ARE sadly enough people that will instantaneously, automatically see something or someone they don't know and run quick to Mr. policeman under the cop out (bad joke intended....think about it) of "being proactive".

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I've just always wondered.....how often do people get looked at strange for doing this? I mean, it always makes me a bit worried that someone is going to report a "suspicious" (term WAY over-used today!) person when they see you picking through a tree in a park or trying to reach in culvert pipes or a hundred other things to find these. About the only place I feel OK parking is a parking lot instead of on the shoulder of a road -especially a hi-way as I recently noticed it was either that or in a private parking lot across the street owned by a motel. Anyone ever have police or park maintenance workers or whoever walk up to them & drill them as to what they're doing? Heck, nowadays with the way things are you walk around (apparently aimlessly to others) in a public park when there's a woman with kids there anywhere and you're likely to have her get paranoid you're "up to something" & have the police on you!

Not saying I'm afraid of doing this and giving this geo-ing thing up. Just curious how often people get looked at funny for walking around all over looking and searching around & in things most people wouldn't.

 

I have been approached by the local police on a few occasions. The first time I got surrounded by about 3+ cars. I was very polite towards them and when asked what I was doing, I explained geocaching to them. One officer said he had heard about it but didn't know much or where to look for more info. I kindly handed them a flyer I printed off geocaching.com. Now I very rarely get approached and in the areas where I requested to be placed on file, I will sometimes get a call from the dispatcher asking if I am in such and such location. If I am they seem to send one car to scout. I mainly do most of my caching at night after I get off work and usually in the same 5 mile radius from my job. Through my job, I have gotten to know most of the cops anyway, so it's not that big a deal anymore.

 

Is it gonna happen, yea, and I say the best way to deal with it is to be as polite as you can be, explain what it is you are doing and why, and carry some form of info on your like a flyer, pamphlet or business card that you can hand out if the person asking wants to get more info about geocaching. I have had excellent results with this approach so far.

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Serious answer, I've probably been questioned by police 10-15 times over 11 years and it's always been a friendly conversation except once. I've been told to move on by shopping center rentacops a few times. I might get the 'what are you doing' from a concerned citizen 1-2 times a year. But I am out caching a lot.

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Well, never been approached, though I haven't really tallied up many finds yet, I assume I will get approached at some point.

 

As for funny looks, I get them all the time, even when not geocaching.

 

Im a 23 year old male who collects hoodies, so most of the time, even if it's a sunny day, I could be on a 10 mile walk with one of my hoodies on and my hood up, but I like the look thats all, it's stereo-types that make people look at me the way they do.

 

As long as I'm not doing anything wrong I don't mind, when I'm walking I usually block out the rest of the world anyway, It's my way of some relaxing alone time with my thoughts. So unless someone draw attention to themselves I probably wouldn't even notice them much.

 

If I do get approached then it happens, as long as I'm polite and explain what I'm doing I have no doubt it will be a pleasant encounter.

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A few days ago my husband got approached by a Vermont State Trooper while he was geocaching after dark. When he mentioned he was out looking for a cache the trooper just remarked that he used to geocache and told him to continue searching.

 

I am rather glad the authorities are checking on 'suspicious' indivuduals. Makes me feel a little safer out there :)

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Just curious how often people get looked at funny for walking around all over looking and searching around & in things most people wouldn't.

 

Let's see...... We've been stopped and questioned by one university security officer, three police officers, two border patrol officers and two highway patrol officers. I generally start off the conversation with, "Have you ever heard of Geocaching?". Most have heard of it and they can see from our iPhone geocaching app that we are in fact geocaching.

 

(edited to correct spelling error) I hate it when that happens.......

Edited by Love Cachers

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Made the mistake crossing from Maine to New Brunswick saying we were going geocaching. "The nearest on is up that hill. Now come inside while we check you out." Half hour wasted. 45 minutes coming back to Maine. (Tell my sister to shut up!.)

Questioned by a Beach Patrol Officer from a different town for 'standing on the bridge.' But that's where the benchmark is!

Worst one was a local park. First step of the multi was on a park bench. Found the multi, and headed for the puzzle cache in the swamp. (Wrong side of the stream. Oh, well.) Met by two police officers. "A lady reported you for putting something on the bench." (No. I did not mention that she was violating park rules by walking with someone not her child towards the woods. Probably her grandmother, but it did violate park rules... "Children only permitted in this area accompanied by their parents." She was obviously not the parent...) Cops questioned us, ran us through their website, and drove off. I guess a long-haired senior citizen accompanied by a short Hispanic are not welcomed in some high-class suburbs. That's a town to avoid in the future! Warned the CO that there might be a problem. But the first stage was still on the bench...

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Here in Southern Arizona if you cache on State Trust Land (there is a permit required) you will be stopped sooner or later. Simple, buy the annual permit from the State of Arizona online. Look for State of Arizona, then state trust land permit.

If a bunch of folks (some are sure to be muggles) have noticed you, probably you should not reveal the cache.

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I have figured out that by wearing camouflage (not talking like realtree or ghillie suits!) just wood specific colors that blend well, an OD green tshirt and camo shorts (i wear those regardless on warm days)

its harder for someone to see you "walking around in the woods" its not all that suspicious if your are just going about your business.

 

Another technique that i use, if i feel like I'm about to be seen by a muggle or someone is being nosey, i will take the cache with me, and wait it out and then return it. so that way they don't take the cache.

or just simply walk away with whatever i had in my hand at the time, just real calmly walk around like im on the phone or i stare at my GPS alot, asking my partner weird questions like " hey did you know the sunset is at X time tonight? cool!" or "hey X o'clock is a good fishing time for today!"

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Serious answer, I've probably been questioned by police 10-15 times over 11 years and it's always been a friendly conversation except once. I've been told to move on by shopping center rentacops a few times. I might get the 'what are you doing' from a concerned citizen 1-2 times a year. But I am out caching a lot.

 

Yup, here too. Las Vegas is criminal capital of the world and in the last 18 months (since I started caching) I've been frisked twice, and stopped by official people (police, city workers, power company...) 5 times.

 

The police were very nice, but very official. And until they knew I was not a risk they weren't at all friendly. Once they searched me and asked what am I doing... they got super nice and I had no problems after that.

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Had my 2nd run in with the local police in just as many years caching... same area too... found cache, cop drove by, signed log, cop drove by again, got in car and pulled out of parking lot, cop pulled into parking lot ahead of me, then pulls out behind me. I knew what was coming... min or so later lights on and I put flashers on and slow down till I can get to a safe place to pull over and off the road. Was asked for the usual info, but I had to ask why I was being pulled over. He said he saw me standing by the light post then get in my van and leave. He wanted to know what I was doing. So I told him I was geocaching and we both had a good laugh, he gave me back my ins and registration cards but took my DL to run through the system. We talked for a few min more about geocaching, and I offered him a caching flyer I printed off the site, though he didnt take it, he did say he had heard of it before. He also asked if there was a cache where I was and I told him there was one in that area and several more though out that property. I dont cache at night expecting to not be questioned, I am fully expecting it at every cache. Actually, I expect to be seen and asked every time I go caching. It is a pleasant surprise when it doesn't happen.

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Here in Southern Arizona if you cache on State Trust Land (there is a permit required) you will be stopped sooner or later. Simple, buy the annual permit from the State of Arizona online. Look for State of Arizona, then state trust land permit.

If a bunch of folks (some are sure to be muggles) have noticed you, probably you should not reveal the cache.

 

Bummer news re: state trust land (just found out about this after submitting a new cache:

 

--------------------------

 

Hello

 

Geocaches on Arizona state trust land (ASTL) are not allowed to be published anymore. This also includes cache listings with bogus coordinates/waypoints that list on ASTL. A decision from the land managers has not yet been finalized on the existing caches that are on ASTL.

 

The Natural Resource Manager has said, "Cachers seem to think that as long as they have a recreational permit from the department that they are free to place caches. The permit application is very specific about placing/leaving items on trust land: The Permittee shall not …cause any refuse or allow any other foreign objects to be deposited on State Trust Land. Here is a link to the complete application: RecreationPermit So, while we greatly appreciate the fact that many cachers have taken the time to obtain a recreational use permit, caching is not an approved form of recreation. Therefore, cachers are not abiding by your placement requirements when placing their caches."

 

You can contact the Natural Resource Manager of the Environmental Resources & Trespass Section if you have any further questions on this land issue and their rules. Contact information can be found at their website Arizona State Land Department.

 

Groundspeak respects the wishes of land managers and land owners. The rules mentioned above are their rules, belonging neither to the reviewers nor to Groundspeak. Responsibility for meeting these rules rests with the cache owner and responsibility for enforcement of those rules rests with the land manager.

 

Thank you.

 

--------------

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Stopped for a cache near an exit from Interstate 81 in Virginia. A state trooper stops and asks if we are having car trouble. I say we are geocaching and give him my 10 second explanation. He looks at me and says:"If I see one I will give you a call". He then drives off.

 

New York City. The cache is a magnetic micro on a post behind the attached no parking sign. I cant reach that high, but I find a metal stick on the ground and spend quite a bit of time trying poking at the cache trying to dislodge it. I notice that there is a police parked up the street with 2 officers watching me. But they aren't moving so I keep at it, till the cache falls down. We sign it an replace it. As we are walking away, the police car drives up and asks if there is a problem with the sign. I say that the sign was Ok and that we were trying to get a geocache. They drove on without comment.

 

New York City. GZ is some kind of modern metal art work on a traffic island in the middle of a street. We looked for a long time without luck. We then noticed a busy doorman at an apartment building across the street. He was motioning to us. As we looked at him, he pointed to a spot where he obviously wanted us to look. We quickly found the cache. We crossed the busy street and went over to thank him. He had no idea what it was all about but he had seen other people looking in that spot.

 

On a trail in Ottawa, 6 of us had used a 20 foot pole to dislodge a micro from a knothole high up in a tree and then did our best to try to get it back in the hole. We managed by attaching the magnetic cache to a metal clasp on a purse and then swing the purse at the top of the pole till the cache was placed back in the hole. As we were swinging the purse back and forth, we noticed a muggle at a patio door of a nearby house watching our efforts.

 

In San Jose CA, we were looking at a hedge along a walkway through a neighbourhood. A neighbour shows up and demands to know why we are staring at his 8 foot high wooden fence, which was behind the hedge. We explained. He left, grumbling as he walked away.

 

In Florida I had to reach under the skirt of a metal statue of a woman to get the magnetic micro. Luckily no one spotted me, or at least I hope not.

 

At the corner of a busy street in California, we are looking for a magnetic cache. I am looking at all the signs and posts and MA is examining a nearby tree. A jeep slows down as it drives by, opens the window and someone yells. "She is closer" as he drives by. The cache was in the tree, attached to a nail in a knot hole

Edited by Ma & Pa

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Here in Southern Arizona if you cache on State Trust Land (there is a permit required) you will be stopped sooner or later. Simple, buy the annual permit from the State of Arizona online. Look for State of Arizona, then state trust land permit.

If a bunch of folks (some are sure to be muggles) have noticed you, probably you should not reveal the cache.

 

Bummer news re: state trust land (just found out about this after submitting a new cache:

 

--------------------------

 

Hello

 

Geocaches on Arizona state trust land (ASTL) are not allowed to be published anymore. This also includes cache listings with bogus coordinates/waypoints that list on ASTL. A decision from the land managers has not yet been finalized on the existing caches that are on ASTL.

 

The Natural Resource Manager has said, "Cachers seem to think that as long as they have a recreational permit from the department that they are free to place caches. The permit application is very specific about placing/leaving items on trust land: The Permittee shall not …cause any refuse or allow any other foreign objects to be deposited on State Trust Land. Here is a link to the complete application: RecreationPermit So, while we greatly appreciate the fact that many cachers have taken the time to obtain a recreational use permit, caching is not an approved form of recreation. Therefore, cachers are not abiding by your placement requirements when placing their caches."

 

You can contact the Natural Resource Manager of the Environmental Resources & Trespass Section if you have any further questions on this land issue and their rules. Contact information can be found at their website Arizona State Land Department.

 

Groundspeak respects the wishes of land managers and land owners. The rules mentioned above are their rules, belonging neither to the reviewers nor to Groundspeak. Responsibility for meeting these rules rests with the cache owner and responsibility for enforcement of those rules rests with the land manager.

 

Thank you.

 

--------------

 

Yes I received the same message, I wonder how long it will take for them to reach a verdict? How many caches do you think are on ASTL? imagine the hit geocaching will take if they all have to be removed.

JIM

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Here in Southern Arizona if you cache on State Trust Land (there is a permit required) you will be stopped sooner or later. Simple, buy the annual permit from the State of Arizona online. Look for State of Arizona, then state trust land permit.

If a bunch of folks (some are sure to be muggles) have noticed you, probably you should not reveal the cache.

I have a friend that lives in Yuma and he has never mentioned this. What is the definition of State Trust Land.

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Here in Southern Arizona if you cache on State Trust Land (there is a permit required) you will be stopped sooner or later. Simple, buy the annual permit from the State of Arizona online. Look for State of Arizona, then state trust land permit.

If a bunch of folks (some are sure to be muggles) have noticed you, probably you should not reveal the cache.

I have a friend that lives in Yuma and he has never mentioned this. What is the definition of State Trust Land.

 

here is a link that shows all land typs: My link

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Just another reason it sucks to be in Arizona...all of the State Land caches I have come across have been placed and maintained with care, and unless you knew what you were looking for, you would never see it. They are pretty much the only places to find geoart, and is the ONLY reason many of us bought the permit. Sadly, what is ultimately going to suffer is the monetary bottom line for maintainig and preserving these relatively unmolested pieces of desert landscape that were so fun to explore. Shame on you AZ Land Management, shame on you!

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If you wear a hard hat on a safety vest, I would predict no civilians would take notice of you.

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I have been questioned by several officers because they noticed flashlights outside of (choose a location). Most recognize the term "geocaching". Only once did I have an officer continue to look at me suspiciously. I ended up showing him the geocaching app and explaining the hobby. After that, he just shrugged, told me to be careful, and walked away.

 

I have also been busted looking for caches by muggles. Most have asked if I need help looking for something I lost. I simply reply that I am on a treasure hunt. I had one muggle interested and I explained the hobby. He ended up downloading the free app right then and there, creating an account and everything and joined me in my hunt. I wish I had learned his username. I'd be curious if he stuck with the hobby.

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I wish I had learned his username. I'd be curious if he stuck with the hobby.

 

If he had I'm sure he would have logged the same cache and mentioned the encounter, have you checked the logs?

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If there are too many people around and you feel uncomfortable with it...ABORT the search. Keep driving and find it another cache....

 

I've found that I'm less likely going to attract attention in a crowd then when it' just me and 1-2 other people.

 

 

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I was questioned by police in a country town just as I replaced a cache on a guard rail. They hadn't heard of caching so I had to show them the cache. They're only question: "It's got nothing to do with drugs, has it?"

 

And then a Department of Environment and Primary Industries officer thought I looked lost while searching for a cache in the bush (I didn't see or hear him approaching!) Explained geocaching, he explained what he was doing - investigating illegal firewood collection, and we both went about our business within 50 metres of each other.

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I was questioned by police in a country town just as I replaced a cache on a guard rail. They hadn't heard of caching so I had to show them the cache. They're only question: "It's got nothing to do with drugs, has it?"

 

And then a Department of Environment and Primary Industries officer thought I looked lost while searching for a cache in the bush (I didn't see or hear him approaching!) Explained geocaching, he explained what he was doing - investigating illegal firewood collection, and we both went about our business within 50 metres of each other.

 

I was in a small, somewhat hidden park in town, and had just replaced the small container under a stone bench when I turned around and saw that a police car had just pulled into the park. I started walk back toward him, and my car, when he stopped, rolled down his window and motioned me toward his car. The first thing he said was, "what were you hiding under that bench over there". I explained geocaching to him and showed him my GPS and he said that the park was a popular spot for drug use (primary pot smokers) and that was why he had called me over. Looking at it from his point of view I could see why I was stopped. I *was* hiding something under that bench.

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We haven't been stopped, but have been asked a couple times by kids what we are doing. We usually take that chance to introduce them to geocaching. We did find a cache recently that included a sheriff's business card. He'd noted on the card that he'd gotten calls about suspicious activity in the area, found the cache while checking it out, and said it looked like a fun game. We had a good laugh when we read the note.

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I was questioned by police in a country town just as I replaced a cache on a guard rail. They hadn't heard of caching so I had to show them the cache. They're only question: "It's got nothing to do with drugs, has it?"

 

I'm curious to know what sort of drug business involves leaving packages along a highway guardrail or under a lamp post skirt. I did find a plastic bag with athletic socks and about two dozen bullets (9mm, I believe) stuffed into the knothole of a tree while searching for a cache...so I suppose odd stashes of illicit goods are common in that biz...? <_<

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I was questioned by police in a country town just as I replaced a cache on a guard rail. They hadn't heard of caching so I had to show them the cache. They're only question: "It's got nothing to do with drugs, has it?"

 

I'm curious to know what sort of drug business involves leaving packages along a highway guardrail or under a lamp post skirt. I did find a plastic bag with athletic socks and about two dozen bullets (9mm, I believe) stuffed into the knothole of a tree while searching for a cache...so I suppose odd stashes of illicit goods are common in that biz...? <_<

I didn't know that athletic socks were illicit goods! Guess they could be if they have been worn for days without washing...

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It depends where you are. If you happen to be very close to someone's backyard they may take offense, as well as log a find and upload a picture. :blink:

 

You could have warned us about the nature of that picture!! :angry:

Can't believe the CO didn't delete it.

 

Its nothing too unique that nobody hasn't seen. It also appears that they did not disturb the cache anyhow.

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I was questioned by police in a country town just as I replaced a cache on a guard rail. They hadn't heard of caching so I had to show them the cache. They're only question: "It's got nothing to do with drugs, has it?"

 

I'm curious to know what sort of drug business involves leaving packages along a highway guardrail or under a lamp post skirt. I did find a plastic bag with athletic socks and about two dozen bullets (9mm, I believe) stuffed into the knothole of a tree while searching for a cache...so I suppose odd stashes of illicit goods are common in that biz...? <_<

I didn't know that athletic socks were illicit goods! Guess they could be if they have been worn for days without washing...

 

Dealers will often hide the bulk of their stash somewhere so they don't get caught with it all. The socks are intended to be worn as gloves to prevent fingerprints from appearing on guns, and for gunpowder residue from appearing on hands and wrists. They also may have been intended as silencers. It should have been reported, as it might have been used already, or someone was planning to use it..

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Our first cache was a p&g, but near enough to home that we walked. As we walked around the parking lot trying to figure out where it could be (there's nothing here but parking spaces and light poles!), a couple in a car stopped to ask if we were ok. They definitely gave me a strange look as I tried to explain that we were playing a game, in a parking lot, with my rather small children...

 

Nothing since then, although I sometimes wonder if I'm being "stealthy" enough. I'd hate for a cache to get vandalized because of me.

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