Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 23
Unverschämte kleine Wichte

Wherigo with iPhone

Recommended Posts

Hello,

 

I wanted to buy me the new Iphone 3G. It has also GPS. On the Iphone is of course no Windows Software.

In the a software version or another way to install the Wherigo player on the Iphone Software ?

 

Thanks for any feedback

Boris

(Unverschämte kleine Wichte)

Share this post


Link to post

The player is not yet available on the iPhone 3G and I do not expect to see a version for it any time soon.

 

Given the popularity of such a device, I would hope Groundspeak is seriously considering the ability to port the player to it. Had I an Apple computer, I would also look into making programs of my own for the phone (I'm considering getting one at some point).

Share this post


Link to post

IMHO, you won't want to use your iPhone to cache with. Maybe if you have tons of time and you don't need any accuracy (like finding a micro would never work).

 

However, if the program is build... Wherigo should be a blast for an iPhone.

Share this post


Link to post

i want a iphone 3g Wherigo.app too!

 

is the format of the game conainer public?

maybe i can find someone who can write a app...

but without the container format... it is very difficult...

then the officials should make such a application.

there are so many 3G's out there new.. this would bring a huge boost to this kind of game...

i hope there will be more (positive) info soon...

Share this post


Link to post

For the next version we're focusing on J2ME instead of Objective C. This does not mean we won't eventually target the iPhone like we're doing for Geocaching.

 

J2ME opens up a broader assortment of platforms, including Android. Once we're done with this development we'll target other platforms including the iPhone. Wherigo has been designed to work across platforms and we'll be true to that goal.

Share this post


Link to post

So that's why the public hasn't seen a new Player release since the end of May. Makes sense, then.

 

Wow, Groundspeak doing Java... That's the first I've heard of Groundspeak using an non-Microsoft development platform. (Well, at least since I came aboard "recently" in 2006.) Good luck and have fun!

 

I remember creating applications, JSPs, and JWS--consuming them, too. That was a little more than five years ago. It was much easier to do in .Net, hence my switch. By now, development must have improved.

Share this post


Link to post

ok... maybe another idea works...

since most of the iphones and many other devices have a internet flat rate...

would be a Wherigo-web-application a option?

 

making a webapplication for many mobile devices is maybe easier then making a complete app for a single device?

the only problem is... how can the webserver get the position of the device through the webpage...

 

but if it is too difficult... i will wait until the "official" iphone app is ready...

i think if you tell ppl about it in some blogs and ask how fast they want it.. there will be a huge feedback.. ;-)

Edited by eric1000

Share this post


Link to post

Oh..........maybe it would be nice just to have it work right on a Colorado???

Share this post


Link to post

Oh..........maybe it would be nice just to have it work right on a Colorado???

 

That just made my week... :grin:

Share this post


Link to post

IMHO, you won't want to use your iPhone to cache with. Maybe if you have tons of time and you don't need any accuracy (like finding a micro would never work).

 

However, if the program is build... Wherigo should be a blast for an iPhone.

 

I have found a Micro using just my iPhone...it isn't impossible. :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post

IVe found 2 micros now, one being a 31/2 with just my iphone, it is very possbile, but the compass can be frustrating at times.

Share this post


Link to post

You are absolutely wrong that you can't use the iPhone to go caching. I ONLY have the iPhone and I'm almost at 100 since Oct 27, 08. I have found plenty of micros, even nanos, but I use the map instead of the navigation, which is more accurate.

 

IMHO, you won't want to use your iPhone to cache with. Maybe if you have tons of time and you don't need any accuracy (like finding a micro would never work).

 

However, if the program is build... Wherigo should be a blast for an iPhone.

Edited by nolechic

Share this post


Link to post

Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, nolechic, and one's experience differs per person as well as the intended use. Using the satellite view map is a good idea and I have used it to find a few caches. I would like to argue, though, a GPSr's precision is needed if you're pursuing a difficult hide--if not just for the time saving alone an accurate position would provide. But I do agree an iPhone is fine for recreational cachers to use.

 

Considering Wherigo needs a reliable, good fix on the player's position, I still question the iPhone. It depends on the zones' sizes if a 30' - 60' accuracy, depending on the area, would be sufficient. Some cartridge authors define small zones either by necessity or area. But as long as an iPhone Player would have a positive effect on Wherigo's market exposure and player's experience, I'd say go for it.

 

There are other threads for caching with an iPhone. In a few posts, I'd like to see this thread come back to discussing the possibility of Wherigo on an iPhone and what that experience might be like.

 

 

You are absolutely wrong that you can't use the iPhone to go caching. I ONLY have the iPhone and I'm almost at 100 since Oct 27, 08. I have found plenty of micros, even nanos, but I use the map instead of the navigation, which is more accurate.

Share this post


Link to post

Iphone GPS device really isn't that bad at all. I was 3 for 3 today including a Micro (that I didn't know was a micro). Best $10 I ever spent.

Share this post


Link to post

I have a Garmin Nuvi 200 and an iPhone 3G... guess which GPSr is my primary caching device? the iPhone. I think that Wherigo and the iPhone are made for each other. I'm looking forward to possible iPhone development for Wherigo. I know that they're working as fast as they can to open it up to as many platforms as possible, but I'm starting to feel impatient. I think the sales and use of the Geocaching app for iPhone is some pretty good evidence that there's a market for a Wherigo app as well.

Share this post


Link to post

I bought an I phone a couple of weeks ago and have so far only tired it twice for mini geocaches and found neither.However,I then thought maybe Wherigo may be easier and there is one locally (Brueton park,Solihull,England)

Sadly now I cannot download Wherigo player.

Most of these posts in this thread are a year old,does anyone know of any developements since to get round this problem? :D:sad:

Share this post


Link to post

I bought an I phone a couple of weeks ago and have so far only tired it twice for mini geocaches and found neither.However,I then thought maybe Wherigo may be easier and there is one locally (Brueton park,Solihull,England)

Sadly now I cannot download Wherigo player.

Most of these posts in this thread are a year old,does anyone know of any developements since to get round this problem? :);)

 

I'm going to keep this under my watch list too. I think its an awesome idea to create Wherigo for the iphone.

Share this post


Link to post

Having last year become very mildly interested in Geocaching but never having the time/ability to get involved, I now find myself in a position where I could do more. Physical limitations (and my propensity to attract every biting insect in a 50 mile radius) keep me from doing too much but having just bought the new 2nd edition Complete Idiot's Guide to Geocaching and read the stuff written by the staff, I "discovered" Wherigo and realized that I could create some really great adventures for folks who wanted to 'see Maine'.

 

I'd bought the Geocaching app for my iPhone 3G and was even more excited until I got to this site and realized that the software for creating this stuff was in ALPHA and now a year old. There was nothing for the iPhone, sadly, either and I'm not about to spend $400 for a separate GPS when it looks like this whole concept is being hung out to dry.

 

It would certainly be nice to see some reassurance from the 'powers that be' that Wherigo is a viable, active project that just needs a little more time - along with a broad/vague timeline so that I - and others - can either keep salivating or simply move on in life. Just having a couple of recent posts in this thread show there's a modicum of interest but it's frankly depressing to see what little there is.

 

Thoughts?

Ed

Share this post


Link to post

Having last year become very mildly interested in Geocaching but never having the time/ability to get involved, I now find myself in a position where I could do more. Physical limitations (and my propensity to attract every biting insect in a 50 mile radius) keep me from doing too much but having just bought the new 2nd edition Complete Idiot's Guide to Geocaching and read the stuff written by the staff, I "discovered" Wherigo and realized that I could create some really great adventures for folks who wanted to 'see Maine'.

 

I'd bought the Geocaching app for my iPhone 3G and was even more excited until I got to this site and realized that the software for creating this stuff was in ALPHA and now a year old. There was nothing for the iPhone, sadly, either and I'm not about to spend $400 for a separate GPS when it looks like this whole concept is being hung out to dry.

 

It would certainly be nice to see some reassurance from the 'powers that be' that Wherigo is a viable, active project that just needs a little more time - along with a broad/vague timeline so that I - and others - can either keep salivating or simply move on in life. Just having a couple of recent posts in this thread show there's a modicum of interest but it's frankly depressing to see what little there is.

 

Thoughts?

Ed

 

I would have to agree. I am fairly new to geocaching, but am loving it. It get me out of the house. I am a gamer and as such am always on the computer. this would be great for me and love the idea of playing games in the real world while out and about. Just another excuse to leave my chair. :laughing: That being said I also have an Iphone with the geocaching application which I was willing to pay for. I was wondering if they were putting an application out. I am sure most people would again be willing to pay the $10 as I was with the Geocaching application.

Share this post


Link to post

If one more "I'm a iPhone owner with no PPC access who would like to get into Wherigo" vote counts toward developing an app - here it is.

 

BTW I have used a Garmin eTrex in the past, an iPhone and both simultaneously to geocache and found varying degrees of accuracy with each. I now use the iPhone solely because it is usually as accurate, always accurate enough and the user experience with the upgraded Geocaching app is fantastic. Truly paperless geocaching from start to finish. I often go geocaching on a whim now and love the ability to post a field note and then go online to post my finds.

Share this post


Link to post

Same as the other posters. I started Geocaching 4 days ago. Bought the iPhone app 2 days ago. Use both maps and GPS for finding caches.

 

Just came across Wherigo. Love the concept. Sadly disappointed there's no iPhone app (yes, I'd pay $9.99 again) as it sounds great. The builder should be made in Java so it can be cross-platform (I use a mac most days).

 

Go iPhone!!

Share this post


Link to post

Really like the Wherigo concept and want to get in the game. Ive been Geocacheing with the Iphone exclusively, and had great success using the Groundspeak app. I would defiantly buy the a Wherigo app if one were available.

 

RJdriver

Share this post


Link to post

Cacheing with your iphone is great. I use it all the time and can pop it out and find a cache where ever I am at. The geocaching app for the iphone gives you all the information about the cache and provides a map view navigation to the cache. All you Iphone users should really try caching with your phone, you will love it.

Share this post


Link to post

I got rid of my Lowrance GPS when I realized over time that my iPhone and the various Geocaching apps I have loaded to it outperformed my GPS every time. That is until some recent outings where my cords were way off, but that may have been due to operator error or some bad cord translation between apps as I was entering cords in one app and caching in another.

 

I have just recently been told that the new iPhone 3G"S" now has an internal GPS built in, unlike its predecessor which relied on cell tower proximity for signal and triangulation. This means the iPhone and apps will no longer be "signal dependent" which is the biggest drawback for me so far. When you have a pin dropped on a cache location but loose your signal and then cannot navigate to the cache.

 

I am very eager to step up to a new phone, but I typically skip a generation on upgrades just to save myself some $, so I will just have to be patient.

 

I too am eager to dive into this Wherigo method of guided touring and can think of many tours that I would create in the area. Unfortunately, as many have said, there is no iPhone app yet and even worse, no Mac version of the player or builder that I can see.

 

You'd think by now that everything being build would be cross-platform! I will be watching...

Share this post


Link to post

We only started geocaching last week when I bought the iphone app, and it works great as I use it all the time to find caches. Then today, I read about Wherigo! I would definately buy the app for the iPhone and I know alot of other people with an iPhone that would do the same.

 

Any indication of when it may be available?

Share this post


Link to post

actualllyyyyy..... i just registered to iPhone developer site to verify, and watch this excerpt from Apple's "iPhone SDK Agreement" :

 

3.3.2 An Application may not itself install or launch other executable code by any means, including without limitation through the use of a plug-in architecture, calling other frameworks, other APIs or otherwise. No interpreted code may be downloaded or used in an Application except for code that is interpreted and run by Apple's Documented APIs and built-in interpreter(s).

 

so basically, running Wherigo (which interprets Lua bytecode) on the iPhone is illegal. :)

well. what can one say to that.

Share this post


Link to post

:laughing:

 

There must be some way around it and really hope Groundspeak want to make some money in set up the app.

 

Maybe you could have an app per cartridge. That should meet the rules. Any if the apps/ cartridges were free, Groundspeak could still make money by having you pay for a unique iPhone/Wherigo user account.

Share this post


Link to post

IMHO, you won't want to use your iPhone to cache with. Maybe if you have tons of time and you don't need any accuracy (like finding a micro would never work).

 

However, if the program is build... Wherigo should be a blast for an iPhone.

 

I have found a Micro using just my iPhone...it isn't impossible. :P

 

half the caches we find are micros. if the gps wont walk you right in, you can always just look at the sat. maps and narrow it down to a couple of feet. i cant imagine your gps gets you any closer

Share this post


Link to post

I would like to add my name to the list of 'Would like to try Wherigo's, but would only do it if an iPhone app was available & certainly wouldn't buy a GPS etc. just to do it.

 

And in defence of the iPhone: Caching with an iPhone is a different way of caching than using a GPS.

 

I only got into caching when I bought the iPhone and I expect that's the same for a lot of people. The iPhone has introduced new people who probably would never have bothered if it meant buying a GPS. It has made it more accessible.

 

More cachers = more caches :-)

 

I mainly find micros and lots of nanos. It's a different way of caching because you use it more like a computer, as you can jump between maps/satellitte maps, look at photos etc. It's always spot on for me and I am hoping to upgrade to the 3GS soon especially if it has built in GPS. There are pros and cons to both the iPhone and a GPS but you just adjust your caching skills accordingly. A GPS may tell you the cache is located under your big toe on your left foot, but on an iPhone you could have a look at the aerial satellitte map that would show you that it's on the left side of the bench, next to the plant pot!

 

Now if we could just have built in Flash and a decent camera on the phone too.......... ;-)

 

(114 finds since about March using an iPhone.)

Edited by TinkyTinks

Share this post


Link to post
I only got into caching when I bought the iPhone and I expect that's the same for a lot of people. The iPhone has introduced new people who probably would never have bothered if it meant buying a GPS. It has made it more accessible

 

Agree with this. I only started Geocaching through the application on the iPhone - money very well spent. Found 80 so far, so although I can't compare the accuracy with a GPSr as I haven't ever owned one, the iPhone is no barrier to success - far from it, makes it very simple to use. I do now have a number of additional battery packs as well, just to keep it going.

 

A Wherigo application would be welcome. Also a Waymarking application that tags the location with the co-ordinates and uploads to the site rather than having to use a separate application and uploading later on the PC.

Edited by ivymill

Share this post


Link to post
3.3.2 An Application may not itself install or launch other executable code by any means, including without limitation through the use of a plug-in architecture, calling other frameworks, other APIs or otherwise. No interpreted code may be downloaded or used in an Application except for code that is interpreted and run by Apple's Documented APIs and built-in interpreter(s).

 

so basically, running Wherigo (which interprets Lua bytecode) on the iPhone is illegal. :D

I'm sure that Groundspeak's legal department would argue that a Wherigo cartridge is not "launching or executing executable code". A Wherigo player which did not expose the Lua API (to the extent that you could program it to do general purpose stuff on the iPhone) is in effect just a program which reads data (the GWC file) and does stuff with it.

 

Apple don't want someone writing the equivalent of Visual Basic for the iPhone ($9.95 for one app which would mean that you don't need to buy the SDK or to sell your other apps through the Store with a lovely cut for Apple). But I think that one could make a good case that there is little material difference between a Wherigo player which reads GWC files and a Geocaching app which reads GPX files.

Share this post


Link to post

well Groundspeak's lawyers might argue as much as they like, and yes, lua bytecode is not "executable code" per se - but "interpreted code" is definitely downloaded and used.

 

now from what i hear, this clause is there to block, among other things, adobe's Flash player.

and yes, there's a long way from Wherigo to flash. but as a case in point, you can write a calculator in Wherigo. you can write an interactive tour guide, a star map... if you tried hard enough, you could probably write a lua interpreter. all in all, stuff that actually can be distributed as a separate app on the app store.

sure, Wherigo api allows only limited interactivity, but you can actually write actual programs in it. no lawyering around that :D

Share this post


Link to post

I bet someone has a spreadsheet for the iPhone with a macro feature, and the people at my place of work who get let loose with Excel macros seem to develop what I would call "programs". At least, they have as many bugs as any "real" program. :)

Share this post


Link to post

IMHO, you won't want to use your iPhone to cache with. Maybe if you have tons of time and you don't need any accuracy (like finding a micro would never work).

 

Hopefully it's a dead horse by now, but anybody who says the iphone isn't accurate, or is unable to find micros (or nanos) is just wrong.

 

Like I said, hopefully everybody knows better by now.

 

Like many people have already said, I've found plenty of nanos with it. One of the nanos I found said it was within 1 foot. I thought, 'it can't be inside the tree'. Sure enough, it was inside the tree. Exactly where my iphone said.

 

 

Must admit I had to get the gps out a couple times today when the iPhone was a little shakey.

 

Have never had that happen. When I'm at GZ, I put the phone away and use instinct and skills to nail the cache. I really just need to get within so many feet, and then I can figure out the rest.

 

I don't use the sat pic unless I"m really stumped. I consider the pic to be equilivent of the hint. I try to use neither unless I really have to do so...

Share this post


Link to post

So, there is a GPS bluetooth stack for the iPhone right now, called roqyBT (search "roqybt" in google).

With this software you can couple a high accurary GPS mouse with your iPhone/iPod replacing the build in GPS.

Share this post


Link to post

IMHO, you won't want to use your iPhone to cache with. Maybe if you have tons of time and you don't need any accuracy (like finding a micro would never work).

 

However, if the program is build... Wherigo should be a blast for an iPhone.

 

I have found a Micro using just my iPhone...it isn't impossible. :lol:

 

Yeah, I've found a lot of micros with my iPhone. I haven't had much problem with it being any less accurate than the couple of GPSrs that I have but the lag time can be really painful.

Share this post


Link to post

But I do agree an iPhone is fine for recreational cachers to use.

 

 

So how does one become a "professional" cacher? :D:lol:

Share this post


Link to post

This really is off-subject, but I feel like posting anyway, especially to give an opinion in case someone is out there wondering whether or not they should purchase an iPhone for geocaching purposes. The answer is an emphatic "yes and no." I have an iPhone 3Gs and its accuracy as a GPS unit is atrocious. It reminds me of when Selective Activation was still in effect. At best I have found it to be accurate within 30-70 feet, which is a universe of space to a cacher. Personally, I don't see how anyone can successfully find caches with it. It doesn't hold a candle to my DeLorme PN-40. Now, with that being said, I find the iPhone indespensable in my caching adventures (that is, with good signal/reception). It allows me to go caching "on the fly," discovering caches nearby that I had not previously loaded in my GPSr. It gives me a great interface to read all about the cache information that is much more visually attractive and navigable than my GPSr. I can also upload field notes "immediately" to GC.com, rather than save them for later. This comes in handy sometimes if I feel the need to communicate to the website sooner. Overall then, I would feel lost without my DeLorme, and it is definitely my #1 choice. The iPhone is a useful adjunct, but when honing in on GZ, it pales in comparison to a real GPSr.

Share this post


Link to post

I've found every cache so far with the iPhone and MOST of them micros and nanos. I dont need, nor do I WANT a gps to take me exactly to the spot. What the heck fun is that?

I find the phone highly accurate. Once I get to the GZ, I turn the phone off and use good ol' geosense. How could you possibly want more? Why on earth pay an arm and leg so that you can have the machine do all the work for you? Boring. And I've done level 5 caches and nanos in the woods. Works like a charm!

 

I always laugh when I hear people dog the iPhone's accuracy. Reminds me of people who need the whole story spelled out for them too.

Share this post


Link to post

This really is off-subject, but I feel like posting anyway, especially to give an opinion in case someone is out there wondering whether or not they should purchase an iPhone for geocaching purposes. The answer is an emphatic "yes and no." I have an iPhone 3Gs and its accuracy as a GPS unit is atrocious. It reminds me of when Selective Activation was still in effect. At best I have found it to be accurate within 30-70 feet, which is a universe of space to a cacher. Personally, I don't see how anyone can successfully find caches with it. It doesn't hold a candle to my DeLorme PN-40. Now, with that being said, I find the iPhone indespensable in my caching adventures (that is, with good signal/reception). It allows me to go caching "on the fly," discovering caches nearby that I had not previously loaded in my GPSr. It gives me a great interface to read all about the cache information that is much more visually attractive and navigable than my GPSr. I can also upload field notes "immediately" to GC.com, rather than save them for later. This comes in handy sometimes if I feel the need to communicate to the website sooner. Overall then, I would feel lost without my DeLorme, and it is definitely my #1 choice. The iPhone is a useful adjunct, but when honing in on GZ, it pales in comparison to a real GPSr.

 

I'm really shocked about this claim of "30-70 feet accuracy" with a 3Gs! WOW! That's horrible. I have better accuracy than many of my friends with their GPSr's and have had to help them zero out coords for their hides using my phone. The satellite map is awesome and much quicker than trying to zero out some numbers. :anibad: I've beaten people to FTFs because of this too. Haha. I love my phone and have almost 300 finds with it. The only problem is possibly in the woods or during bad weather, like any other GPS..

Share this post


Link to post

Well this threads quickly answered my question to myself "Should I create some Wherigo caches"

 

A big blinding NO

Share this post


Link to post

Well this threads quickly answered my question to myself "Should I create some Wherigo caches"

 

A big blinding NO

 

Ditto. If the iphone could have Wherigo compatibility, I'd probably make a few.

Share this post


Link to post

I only have a 3GS for caching and I have found over 140 of all sizes; including micro's; in less than 2 months. I have been searching in areas that have very good 3G reception and I do alot of spontaneous caching. My iphone has taken me right to alot of them. That being said I am looking at getting a very good GPS so I can cache outside of 3G range as I have been within a km or two of some when I lose my signal and there fore all hopes of finding it. I also want to try Wherigo caches.

Share this post


Link to post
But I do agree an iPhone is fine for recreational cachers to use.

 

I think I've asked this question before but, where do I sign up to become a professional cacher? B)

I thought we were all "recreational" cachers.

 

And for the record I've found lots of micros with the iphone including a few nanos. It does require patience but it is as accurate at my PN-20 and Explorist it is just so dang slow.

Share this post


Link to post

I only have a 3GS for caching and I have found over 140 of all sizes; including micro's; in less than 2 months. I have been searching in areas that have very good 3G reception and I do alot of spontaneous caching. My iphone has taken me right to alot of them. That being said I am looking at getting a very good GPS so I can cache outside of 3G range as I have been within a km or two of some when I lose my signal and there fore all hopes of finding it. I also want to try Wherigo caches.

 

I just have a 3G iPhone and have been caching with it in an area that I not only didn't have 3G coverage I had no coverage at all. No Edge and no phone service. The GPS worked fine and it was still as accurate as my son's Explorist. But again, you must be patient. I think all together we found about 30 or 40 caches out there. Maybe there is something different about the 3Gs. B)

 

BTW I did download and save the caches where I did have service before we went out. So the data was with me I just didn't have maps (I did this before the last upgrade to geocaching software) but followed the compass and did just fine.

Share this post


Link to post

I personally would say scrap the native app and make a Web App and Dev Kit for people.

Mobile Safari can read your cords off the GPS and a WebService like geocaching.com could host the decision engine, videos, animations, ect.

 

Here is how to use it already:

http://mapscripting.com/how-to-use-geoloca...n-mobile-safari

 

Lets get this rolling.

This would work for all phones too that could support the web and if it's a standard W3C than thats a bonus.

Edited by FamilyGeek

Share this post


Link to post

make it a web app that will run a program for you. for thousands of "you" at a time.

and ofcourse it would work for all those phones, because, y'know, all phones can send gps data to the web, even those that don't have their built-in gps.

awesome idea, really.

Share this post


Link to post

Oh, my, where do I begin? How about just with thoughts?

 

First, I do like the thought of creating a cartridge to run with what you have. No sarcasm.

 

Scalability is important. This idea will work for up to a hundred people playing cartridges at the same time, sending GPS coordinates to the web site every five seconds. That's close to the time I'd expect round-trip client-server-client communication to take. However, by that time, the player may have already passed a zone. Then there's the problem that web pages cannot push data to a client. Whatever happens in the cartridge, such as a timer expiring, must wait until the next coordinate update so they can be displayed on the client. You may end up needing to use a JavaScript timer, but you still run into issues where the player did perform an action within the specified time, but the coordinate update came too late. For a cartridge like Whack-A-Lackey, timing is key. (Off topic: I still haven't come up with anything more innovative than that game...) These things can kill a cartridge.

 

Well, let's take this to the extreme, then. Let's implement a web site that will provide all JavaScript necessary to run the entire cartridge directly on the phone (minus the images). This solves the update interval problem because we could update every second, just like a real GPSr. However, this certainly breaks cartridge security: anyone could load the cartridge on a PC's web browser, look at the resultant JavaScript, and retrieve the final cache's location. Not good. While you'd still lack true directional pointers for most phones, you could make a guess as to which direction someone is facing (when walking) by comparing the last two points to produce a bearing. Not good when standing still, but it works. Finally, you're at the mercy of the cell phone's processing capability. Would some complex cartridges begin to tax it? Remember: you have to calculate distances to all active objects every second.

 

Creating an app would be platform-dependent, but at least you'd get a better response time and access to the phone's full features and capabilities. You'd also be able to save cartridges when the user exits the application or receives a call. Being an iPhone owner and programmer, I considered creating an app. However, I have neither a Mac nor the time (I'm more than 500 cache logs behind at the moment; I found more than 5,000 last year). I would, at least, like to explore Mono later.

 

(As for hacking, I'd rather hack a cartridge than play it. I enjoy the challenge and might learn something new. I will often hack a cartridge first just to see if I can do so, then go out and play it normally so I get the experience as intended.)

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 23

×